Category Archives: Call for Contributions

Call for contributions: The idiosyncrasy of indigenism in Latin America. Plurality of sources and extra-Latin American appropriations

marina-nunez-del-prado-plegariaCall for contributions: Artelogie Journal, ‘The idiosyncrasy of indigenism in Latin America. Plurality of sources and extra-Latin American appropriations’
Deadline: March 30, 2018

Coordinated by Michele Greet (George Mason University), Anahi Luna (UNAM, Mexico), Fernanda Sarmento (Sao Paulo University), Elodie Vaudry (Paris Nanterre University)

In the mid-1920s, Peruvian intellectual José Carlos Mariátegui introduced the term “indigenism” and defined it as a Latin American avant-garde trend that manifested as a literary genre, a political ideology, and an artistic classification. Nevertheless, as Michele Greet demonstrates in Beyond National Identity: Pictorial Indigenism as a Modernist Strategy in Andean Art, 1920-1960, indigenism is also the result of a paradoxical dialectic between the national and the international spheres. This “negotiation” between the national and the international is at the heart of the problem to be addressed in the next issue of Artelogie, which invites investigations of this Latin American trend as a strategy of transculturation between Latin America and the rest of the world. Mainly studied as a centripetal movement in Latin America, we propose a consideration of indigenism as a centrifugal, plurisecular and cross-cultural phenomenon.
Indeed, it seems that in foreign cities such as Paris, indigenism was also constructed and deployed in a transnational way in response to political and cultural schema. In the 20th and 21th centuries, Europe and then the United States, among others regions, were the locations where indigenism found its intellectual, political and visual inspiration and/or the cites, where it could find its purpose. Consequently, in the post-war period, Ecuadorian Oswaldo Guayasamín (1919-1999) defends the Indian in paint via a re-reading of the works of Picasso and Bernard Buffet. Sculptors such as Marina Núñez del Prado (1910-1992), architects such as Pedro Ramírez Vásquez (1919-2013), musicians such as Theodore Valcárcel (1900-1942) also appropriate methods, techniques, and materials from outside Latin American to design buildings and compose melodies in support of the Native American cause. To these examples, we can add of course the appropriations of native traditions, in particular those from the Amazon, as well as multiple contemporary creations, both in the field of design and the visual arts.
By approaching Latin American and European art history within the framework of a simultaneously conflictive and collaborative modernity, rather than “opposing insular nationalism and alienating internationalism,” this cultural history project would reveal their common dynamics and highlight the diachronic and diasporic hybridization of contemporary visual culture. The purpose is thus to approach indigenism – or indigenisms – chronologically from the 20th to the 21st century. The aim is to analyze its construction as it has been elaborated outside of the borders of Latin America, in travel to and from foreign countries and nations with cultural indigenism and in connection with other contemporary movements addressing or related to identity politics.

Exploring the productive tensions surrounding indigenist art and considering different perceptions of this long cultural history will facilitate a rethinking of the fights for representation and self-representation undertaken by diverse cultures in Latin America. Moreover, we could correlate these analyses with other cultural phenomena dealing with identity formation, such as those in North America, Oceania and Africa.

The theme of this forthcoming issue of Artelogie deals with transfers between cultures, which are very different at different moments in history – – i.e. the pre-Colombian era- and in the space. Thus, a multidisciplinary approach seems essential, linking art history, the history of the ideas, and anthropology. In this study it is also necessary to consider the themes of political, diplomatic, and economic exchange between France and Latin American countries.

Suggested themes:

– How dialogue(s) between ” western culture ” and native groups took place
– Sources – models and counter-models – of indigenism outside Latin America
– Inversions: native portraits through the eyes of Westerners / Westerners portraits through the eyes of natives
– Indigenism and the artistic avant-garde, processes of appropriation and fracture
– Cites of the formation of indigenism outside Latin America
– How the diasporic processes of indigenism in the 19th and 20th centuries served the internal politics of Latin America
– Model and counter-model: indigenism as a reaction to and an appropriation of western models
– How the processes of hybridization interact with the concepts of heritage, tradition and innovation
– Native artistic expressions that reflect cultures founded on other values and beliefs, what are the ways to validate and interact with this diversity?

How to apply: 

-Deadline for official acceptance of original unpublished work: 30th of March 2018
– Total length of the text: characters (no more than 50000 characters or 35 pages), including title, authors’ bibliographic data and e-mails, summary, introduction, all other paragraphs considered appropriate, conclusion, acknowledgements (if necessary) and references.
– Please follow closely the style guide for authors of Artelogie: https://artelogie.revues.org/621
– Please send articles to: artelogie@gmail.com

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Call for Contributions: Chromatography special issue, HARTS and Minds Journal

goyadrowningdog

The drowning Dog, Francisco de Goya  ©Museo Nacional del Prado

The Graduate School of Arts and Humanities at Bristol University seeks submissions for the newt issue of their postgraduate journal HARTS and Minds, which will be dedicated to Chromatography or Colour Studies and will be published March 2018. This Special Issue aims to renegotiate the idea that colour is rooted solely in the visual.
HARTS and Minds welcomes articles, book reviews, exhibition reviews, and creative writing pieces.
For articles please send a 300 word abstract by the 10th of September 2017 to editors@harts-minds.co.uk. Accepted articles of 6,000 words will be due October 31st 2017.
Suggested topics include:

Colour symbolism
The materiality of colour
Colour history
The significance of colour in different cultures
The effect of colour science and optics on the humanities
Synaesthesia, or hearing/tasting/smelling colour
Black and white or ‘the absence of colour’
Language and naming colour
Gendering, queer or so called ‘perverse’ colours
Colour and the emotions and the senses
Architectural color and the environment
Colour theory
Natural vs. synthetic or unnatural colour
Colour in advertising and media
The psychology of colour

Please click here for the full CFP

Liz Renes (Editor in Chief) and Jade Boyd (Special Editor)