Category Archives: Call for Contributions

The Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal: Call for Submissions, deadline 31 January

To encourage emerging scholars that are based in the UK, ARTES, in collaboration with the Embassy of Spain, awards an annual essay medal to the author of the best art-historical essay on a Hispanic theme, which must be submitted in competition and judged by a reading Sub-Committee. The medal is named after Juan Facundo Riaño (1829-1901), the distinguished art historian who was partly responsible for a growing interest in Spanish culture in late nineteenth-century Britain. The winner is also awarded a cash prize of £400, and the runner-up is awarded a certificate and prize of £100 – both prizes are generously sponsored by the Office for Cultural and Scientific Affairs of the Embassy of Spain. Prize-winners also receive a year’s free membership to ARTES, and the winning essays are considered for publication in the annual visual arts issue of Hispanic Research Journal. See the information about eligibility and rules of competition. The deadline is 31st January each year. 

Entering the Essay Competition

The judges will be looking for evidence of originality of thought and high academic and literary quality. Essays must focus on the production or reception of the art, architecture or visual culture of the Hispanic world, defined in the broadest possible terms.

As a permanent reminder of the winner’s achievement, an essay medal is awarded, together with a cash prize of £400. The winning essay will be considered for publication in the annual visual arts issue of Hispanic Research Journal. The runner-up may be awarded the ARTES commendation certificate, together with a prize of £100, and an essay so commended may also be considered for publication in Hispanic Research Journal. Both prize-winners also receive a year’s free membership to ARTES.

Essays are submitted by 31st January each year, and are read by the Essay Medal Committee, appointed by ARTES. The decision of the Committee shall be final. Presentation of the medal is usually made at a special ceremony in London in July the same year, and the result is announced on the ARTES website.

Previous Winners

2019: No award was made

2018: Javier Vicente Arenas, a Masters student at the Warburg Institute, for ‘Constructing a “Transmediterranean” Identity: Rodrigo de Borgia’s Italian Angels in Valencia Cathedral (1472-81)’.

2017: David Cambronero, a MA student at The Courtauld, for ‘Lighting the Great Mosque of Cordoba in the Caliphal Period’.

2016: Leah McBride, a PhD student at Glasgow University, for ‘‘The grave is only half full; who will help us fill it?’: The Politics of Trauma in Alfredo Jaar’s Rwanda Project‘.

2015: Rebekah Lee, a PhD student at the University of York, for ‘Catherine of Austria, Queen of Portugal and the Courtly Portrayal of Middle Age’.

2014: Lesley Thornton-Cronin, a first year PhD student at Glasgow University, for ‘Image-Making by Means of Metaphoric Transposition in the Work of Joan Miró’.

2013: Maite Usoz, a third year PhD student at King’s College, London, for  ‘Sex and the City: Urban Eroticism in Rodrigo Muñoz Ballester’s Manuel Series’.

Regulations for the Essay Medal

1. Essays must be anonymous. Entrants must select a pseudonym under which to submit their text, with a sealed envelope bearing the pseudonym and containing their real name, address and telephone number. Please note that because of the anonymity of the submissions, no acknowledgement of receipt will normally be sent. If a receipt is required, please send a stamped envelope addressed to your pseudonym or to a friend.

2. There is no age limit for entrants, but the Essay Medal Committee reserves the right to give preference to entrants who have not previously published in the field of Hispanic visual arts. We welcome submissions from researchers in a variety of circumstances, but envisage that most essays will be submitted from early career scholars, post-graduate students or undergraduates with exceptionally good end-of-degree dissertations. Details of degrees or qualifications, as well as previous publications, must be submitted with the entrant’s real name and address. Entrants should ideally be resident or studying in the UK, but exceptions may be made if entrants can demonstrate sustained engagement with students, scholars, objects or materials in the UK.

3. The Hispanic world is defined in its broadest sense to include all Hispanic and Lusophone regions (including, for example, Latin America). Visual arts are defined in their broadest sense to include all material and visual culture, including film and photography.

4. The essay must not have been previously published and must not have been awarded any national or international prize. A note of any departmental prizes awarded to it must accompany the entrant’s real name and address.

5. Essays may be up to 8,000 words in length, including bibliography (though this is not not necessary if full footnotes are given), all notes and appendices. Entrants are encouraged to submit shorter pieces, however. Shorter submissions will not be penalised on grounds of length, but overlength essays will be refused. A word count and a summary of up to 250 words (additional to the work total) must be included.

6. The essay should demonstrate original thinking. It may be based on a dissertation, and may involve original research, although essays based on a survey of secondary material will also be considered if they are of suitable quality. However, the essay should be self-contained and especially prepared for this competition.

7. Entries must be written in English. They must be typed or printed, double-spaced, and contained in a simple folder. Pages should not be stapled or bound together, and each page should be numbered. Diagrams or illustrations may be included and should be captioned. They may take the form of photocopies, provided they can be easily read. Sources of information and images must be acknowledged. Entrants are advised that their essays and illustrations will need to be photocopied.

8. The winning essay may be  considered for publication in the visual arts issue of Hispanic Research Journal, subject to the usual process of refereeing, and to acceptance by the Editors, whose decision on this is final. In the event of the essay being accepted for publication, some reworking may be required. Essays may not be offered for publication elsewhere while they are sub judice.

9. In the case of any dispute about the award, the decision of the ARTES Essay Medal Committee shall be final.

10. ARTES reserves the right to make no award if none of the entries is considered worthy.

11. The closing date for entries is 31st January each year. Essays received after this date will not be considered.

12. Two identical copies of the essay should be sent to: Dr Tom Nickson, Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, London WC1X 9EW, UK. Envelopes should be clearly marked ‘Artes Essay Medal’. Electronic copies cannot be accepted.

13. Any queries should be directed to tom.nickson@courtauld.ac.uk

Call for Articles: The Iberian Peninsula under Debate: Historiography, Cultural Encounters and Identities (5th-16th centuries)

 

3fdd18_e3c4b86dab8c4e8eba5b868b2c2d518cmv2

A Sé Velha de Coimbra, por Roque Gameiro (1917)

Roda da Fortuna. Revista Eletrônica sobre Antiguidade e Medievo (Electronic Journal about Antiquity and Middle Ages) seeks submission for a thematic dossier, “The Iberian Peninsula under Debate: Historiography, Cultural Encounters and Identities (5th-16th centuries).”

 

Heiress of the Hispanic-Visigothic tradition, the territorial organization of the Iberian Peninsula was the result of a singular historical reality. The Muslims’ invasion of the region in the 8th century intensified the cultural heterogeneity already existing in the region, adding to political-religious conflicts and an ever-changing border. This state of hostility and also, at various moments, of interaction solidified in the experience of Al-Andalus. This peculiar region offers an important and broad interpretative possibility. With the advance of the Christian frontier after the formation of the Portuguese kingdom and the conquests of Cordova (1236) and Seville (1248), the map of the Peninsula changed definitively.

This thematic dossier intends to gather articles that discuss the Iberian experience during the Middle Ages, up to what has been defined as “maritime expansion” in modern historiography. Encompassing multiple research possibilities and varied approaches in such fields as representations, identities, and religious confessions, the debates on the Iberian worlds constitute an enormous challenge to the historian.

The deadline for submitting articles, reviews, and translations are:
– Submission of proposals: until April 30, 2019
– Acceptance of works: July 2019
– Dossier published: August 2019

Proposals must be sent to the e-mail: revistarodadafortuna@gmail.com 

Click here for more information.

 

Call for contributions: The idiosyncrasy of indigenism in Latin America. Plurality of sources and extra-Latin American appropriations

marina-nunez-del-prado-plegariaCall for contributions: Artelogie Journal, ‘The idiosyncrasy of indigenism in Latin America. Plurality of sources and extra-Latin American appropriations’
Deadline: March 30, 2018

Coordinated by Michele Greet (George Mason University), Anahi Luna (UNAM, Mexico), Fernanda Sarmento (Sao Paulo University), Elodie Vaudry (Paris Nanterre University)

In the mid-1920s, Peruvian intellectual José Carlos Mariátegui introduced the term “indigenism” and defined it as a Latin American avant-garde trend that manifested as a literary genre, a political ideology, and an artistic classification. Nevertheless, as Michele Greet demonstrates in Beyond National Identity: Pictorial Indigenism as a Modernist Strategy in Andean Art, 1920-1960, indigenism is also the result of a paradoxical dialectic between the national and the international spheres. This “negotiation” between the national and the international is at the heart of the problem to be addressed in the next issue of Artelogie, which invites investigations of this Latin American trend as a strategy of transculturation between Latin America and the rest of the world. Mainly studied as a centripetal movement in Latin America, we propose a consideration of indigenism as a centrifugal, plurisecular and cross-cultural phenomenon.
Indeed, it seems that in foreign cities such as Paris, indigenism was also constructed and deployed in a transnational way in response to political and cultural schema. In the 20th and 21th centuries, Europe and then the United States, among others regions, were the locations where indigenism found its intellectual, political and visual inspiration and/or the cites, where it could find its purpose. Consequently, in the post-war period, Ecuadorian Oswaldo Guayasamín (1919-1999) defends the Indian in paint via a re-reading of the works of Picasso and Bernard Buffet. Sculptors such as Marina Núñez del Prado (1910-1992), architects such as Pedro Ramírez Vásquez (1919-2013), musicians such as Theodore Valcárcel (1900-1942) also appropriate methods, techniques, and materials from outside Latin American to design buildings and compose melodies in support of the Native American cause. To these examples, we can add of course the appropriations of native traditions, in particular those from the Amazon, as well as multiple contemporary creations, both in the field of design and the visual arts.
By approaching Latin American and European art history within the framework of a simultaneously conflictive and collaborative modernity, rather than “opposing insular nationalism and alienating internationalism,” this cultural history project would reveal their common dynamics and highlight the diachronic and diasporic hybridization of contemporary visual culture. The purpose is thus to approach indigenism – or indigenisms – chronologically from the 20th to the 21st century. The aim is to analyze its construction as it has been elaborated outside of the borders of Latin America, in travel to and from foreign countries and nations with cultural indigenism and in connection with other contemporary movements addressing or related to identity politics.

Exploring the productive tensions surrounding indigenist art and considering different perceptions of this long cultural history will facilitate a rethinking of the fights for representation and self-representation undertaken by diverse cultures in Latin America. Moreover, we could correlate these analyses with other cultural phenomena dealing with identity formation, such as those in North America, Oceania and Africa.

The theme of this forthcoming issue of Artelogie deals with transfers between cultures, which are very different at different moments in history – – i.e. the pre-Colombian era- and in the space. Thus, a multidisciplinary approach seems essential, linking art history, the history of the ideas, and anthropology. In this study it is also necessary to consider the themes of political, diplomatic, and economic exchange between France and Latin American countries.

Suggested themes:

– How dialogue(s) between ” western culture ” and native groups took place
– Sources – models and counter-models – of indigenism outside Latin America
– Inversions: native portraits through the eyes of Westerners / Westerners portraits through the eyes of natives
– Indigenism and the artistic avant-garde, processes of appropriation and fracture
– Cites of the formation of indigenism outside Latin America
– How the diasporic processes of indigenism in the 19th and 20th centuries served the internal politics of Latin America
– Model and counter-model: indigenism as a reaction to and an appropriation of western models
– How the processes of hybridization interact with the concepts of heritage, tradition and innovation
– Native artistic expressions that reflect cultures founded on other values and beliefs, what are the ways to validate and interact with this diversity?

How to apply: 

-Deadline for official acceptance of original unpublished work: 30th of March 2018
– Total length of the text: characters (no more than 50000 characters or 35 pages), including title, authors’ bibliographic data and e-mails, summary, introduction, all other paragraphs considered appropriate, conclusion, acknowledgements (if necessary) and references.
– Please follow closely the style guide for authors of Artelogie: https://artelogie.revues.org/621
– Please send articles to: artelogie@gmail.com

Call for Contributions: Chromatography special issue, HARTS and Minds Journal

goyadrowningdog

The drowning Dog, Francisco de Goya  ©Museo Nacional del Prado

The Graduate School of Arts and Humanities at Bristol University seeks submissions for the newt issue of their postgraduate journal HARTS and Minds, which will be dedicated to Chromatography or Colour Studies and will be published March 2018. This Special Issue aims to renegotiate the idea that colour is rooted solely in the visual.
HARTS and Minds welcomes articles, book reviews, exhibition reviews, and creative writing pieces.
For articles please send a 300 word abstract by the 10th of September 2017 to editors@harts-minds.co.uk. Accepted articles of 6,000 words will be due October 31st 2017.
Suggested topics include:

Colour symbolism
The materiality of colour
Colour history
The significance of colour in different cultures
The effect of colour science and optics on the humanities
Synaesthesia, or hearing/tasting/smelling colour
Black and white or ‘the absence of colour’
Language and naming colour
Gendering, queer or so called ‘perverse’ colours
Colour and the emotions and the senses
Architectural color and the environment
Colour theory
Natural vs. synthetic or unnatural colour
Colour in advertising and media
The psychology of colour

Please click here for the full CFP

Liz Renes (Editor in Chief) and Jade Boyd (Special Editor)