Category Archives: Call for Papers

CFP: Sacred Images in the Iberian Americas until 1700: Processes, Strategies and Agents, Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March 2019

1024px-our_lady_of_guadalupeSACRED IMAGES IN THE IBERIAN AMERICAS UNTIL 1700: PROCESSES, STRATEGIES AND AGENTS

This panel proposes an approach to the phenomenon of sacred images through three main elements: processes, strategies and agents. The mark of the sacred and the miraculous was achieved by different procedures: hierophanies, thaumaturgy, paranormal phenomena (sweating, weeping, mobility). Definitely, the agency of the sculpture or the painting of religious images blossomed in the Iberian Americas, in need of tradition and sacralization.
Texts about the inventio, the hierophany and other manifestations of the image relate the processes of creation and the evolution of these images until marked by the sacred. In most cases, they follow patterns, repeated to the point of being able to establish a rhetoric of the sacred image. In many cases, these stories, regardless of their historical veracity, provide us valuable information about the strategies devised by the agents. Empowered by their sacred image, these agents (religious orders, patrons…) are in a position to get economic benefits (charity, exemptions), political ones (preferential treatment), and they can build an identity at various levels (territorial, ethnic, political…). The huge amount of textual and visual sources allows to deal with case studies in order to understand the crucial role of the image, through the sacred, in the Ibero-American space of this time.
We invite submissions of proposals for 20 minutes presentations that explore case-studies or some of the many aforementioned aspects of sacred images in the Iberian Americas (also Iberian Asia can be considered) between 16th and 17th century.
Please submit abstracts (200 words maximum), along with a title and a CV (300 word maximum including full name, current affiliation and email address) to Escardiel González (escardielge@gmail.com) and Daniel Expósito Sánchez (daniel.exposito@upr.edu) by August 10, 2018.

More information in: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696697/Art-History-CfPs-for-RSA-2019-Toronto

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CFP: Visualizing Scientific Thinking and Religion in the Early Modern Iberian World, CAA 107th Annual Conference, New York, February 13–16, 2019

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Fray Bernadino de Sahagún, The Florentine Codex, 1540–85

Chairs: Brendan C. McMahon (bcmcmaho@umich.edu), Emily Floyd (emilycfloyd@gmail.com)

In recent years, the consideration of visual and material sources has greatly enriched the study of a wide range of scientific practices in the early modern period. As scholars have moved away from characterizing “art” and “science” as discrete categories, they have increasingly turned to paintings, prints, and other forms of artistic production as a means to explore how early modern actors came to understand their experiences of the natural world. While the vast majority of these studies focus on the visual and material culture of Protestant Northern Europe, a small but growing number investigate similar trends in Spain and the Spanish Americas. Yet even as scholars have turned to instances where visual thinking formed a central component of scientific practices in this region, they have been more tentative to consider how religion, and particularly Catholicism, shaped such practices in this context.
This session seeks papers that consider the intersections of visual production, scientific thinking, and religion in the early modern Iberian world, investigating such themes as:
• Material culture, techne, and artisanal epistemologies
• The mobilization of indigenous American and creole systems of natural knowledge
• The Catholic Enlightenment
• Healing, disease, and visual production
• Visual and material culture, theology, and natural philosophical argument
• Epistemic images in the early modern Iberian world
To submit a proposal, please email a 250-word abstract, CV, and proposal form to bcmcmaho@umich.edu and emilycfloyd@gmail.com by Monday August 6, 2018.

Call for Papers: Iberian (In)tolerance (8 November: London)

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Paper proposals are being accepted for “Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges, and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era,” an LAHP Funded Postgraduate Students-led Conference to be held at Senate House, Bedford Room 37, University College, London.

Keynotes speakers include Prof. Trevor Dadson (Queen Mary University) and Prof. Alexander Samson (UCL)
Submission deadline: 20 June 2018

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.
We invite proposals for papers in English (15-20 minutes) that explore the relationships among Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the 17th century and how these relationships changed over time, as represented in literary works that mirrored and were influenced by the particular socio-political dynamics of the period.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• Literature and minorities: Conversos, New Christians, MarranosMoriscos.
• Literature and tolerance, convivencia
, cultural exchanges.
• Literature and legality: statutes of limpieza de sangre (blood purity), blood libel, Pardons of 1609 and 1627, Duke of Lerma, Duke of Olivares.
• Literature beyond the Iberian Peninsula, Spanish identity in France, the Netherlands, Portugal, etc.

Send your proposal here

Candidates will be notified by the 15th of July 2018.
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us here: iberianintolerance@gmail.com.

Organisers:
• Roser López Cruz (King’s College London)
• Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

CFP: Maius Workshop Meeting: ‘Imagining Spain and Latin America Abroad’

Short, informal papers are invited for the next meeting of The Maius Workshop, a community of graduate students and early career researchers working on Iberian and Latin American arts, histories and cultures. For more information about the group, please visit their website.

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Édouard Manet
Monk in Prayer (1865)
MFA Boston

The meeting will take place in the Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute, London WC2R 0RN on June 11 2018, 6:00–7:30pm

The theme of the meeting is ‘Imagining Spain and Latin America abroad.’ Discussion may consider exchange, trade, and the foreign reception of Spanish and Latin American art and culture.

Informal presentations should last no longer than 15 minutes.

The Maius Workshop endeavours to create a supportive environment to present new ideas and talk through problems and open questions. Collaborative research is central to the group’s ethos, and it aims to encourage dialogue rather than showcase fully-resolved material.

If you are interested in attending or presenting your work, please email maiusworkshop@gmail.com before May 15, 2018.

Call for Posters: Collecting Spain: Spanish Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain, V&A, London, 8th and 9th June 2018

 

V&ACall for posters

On 8th and 9th June 2018, the Victoria and Albert Museum is hosting a conference with the aim of studying the collecting history and practices in the Spanish Decorative Arts in Britain and in Spain, from 1850 to the mid-20th century. Research on collectors, art dealers, type of collections, and the development of the Decorative Arts museums in Britain and Spain is the focus of discussion at the conference. The speakers are scholars from English and Spanish museum and universities who will present papers on the collecting of different material from Iberia, such as ceramics, furniture, metalwork, sculpture and casts textiles and fashion, as well as on displaying, conserving and interpreting these artworks.

Call for Posters

This call for poster presentations invites the participation of students studying for Masters or PhD and young researchers who would like to present a poster dealing with one of the Conference topics.

The proposal should be provided in the form of an abstract of 400 words, accompanied by a short CV (an A4 page). It should outline the aims and objectives of the research, the methods, and findings to date. All posters will be peer-reviewed. The poster format will A0

Contact

If you have any questions, feel free to contact us. All correspondence, including your proposals for papers or posters and your CV as well as further questions, should be addressed to a.cabrera@vam.ac.uk and tao.chang@vam.ac.uk

Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages (6th-16th century), 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquaryCall for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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CFP: Wider Worlds: Art and Audience Under the Spanish Crown, The Frick Collection, New York, April 5, 2018

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Call for Papers: 
Wider Worlds: Art and Audience Under the Spanish Crown, The Frick Collection, New York, April 5, 2018
Deadline: Dec 12, 2017

Symposium
The Frick Collection, New York

The Frick Collection is pleased to invite submissions for “Wider Worlds: Art and Audience under the Spanish Crown,” a public symposium inspired by the special exhibition Zurbarán: Jacob and His Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle (January 31 to April 22, 2018). Co-organized with the Meadows Museum, in Dallas, where the paintings are currently on view, this exhibition marks the first time that Francisco de Zurbarán’s set of thirteen monumental canvases depicting the family of the biblical prophet Jacob will be displayed in the Americas.

Zurbarán’s paintings were probably commissioned in the 1640s for a monastery in colonial Spanish Peru, where the popularity of this particular iconography drew on histories positing the indigenous inhabitants of the Americas as “lost descendants” of the twelve tribes of Israel. The works traveled to England and, in 1756, entered the collection of the bishop Richard Trevor, an advocate for the rights of Jewish people. This history, as well as the apocryphal story of the paintings’ seizure by pirates, prompts us to think seriously about the afterlives of objects, anticipated versus accidental receptions, and art’s capacity for generating multivalent, sometimes competing, interpretations. For Jacob and His Twelve Sons, those interpretations range from justifying the enterprises of one colonial empire to serving as symbols of religious tolerance in another.

We welcome proposals for twenty-minute papers on the status of the art object and the circulation of objects and ideas in the early modern Hispanic world. Please send a C.V. and 250-word abstract by Tuesday, December 12, 2017, to academic@frick.org. Submissions from emerging scholars, including early career university and museum professionals and advanced doctoral students, are particularly encouraged. Possible lines of inquiry include:

• How artists, patrons, and audiences dealt with anxieties around distance, delay, and the conveyance of meaning in the diverse and multilingual early modern Hispanic world;
• Re-signification and/or halted trajectories in the biographies of objects, especially in a global context;
• The imaging of origin myths and master narratives;
• How Iberia’s Jewish and Islamic pasts were interrogated and reinterpreted in Catholic image practices;
• The issue of workshops, masters, and authorship and their relationship to global markets;
• The global and material turns in art-historical scholarship.

“Wider Worlds: Art and Audience under the Spanish Crown” is convened by Caitlin Henningsen (The Frick Collection) and Adam Jasienski (Southern Methodist University). Susan Grace Galassi (Senior Curator, The Frick Collection) will preside.