Category Archives: Call for Papers

Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 2018)

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Diego Rivera, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, 1931, SFAI, San Francisco

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 18)

Deadline: 7 August 2017

The Art History of Latin America has been written, for the most part,  in the 20th and 21st century.  As a discipline it is the product of two distinct points of view: the individual countries’ national art histories and visions generated from other regions, which privilege supra-national conceptions of geography and identity. Be they the Hispanic art histories of the 1930s, the North American passion for Mexican muralism of the 1930s, the European interests in alternative forms of Baroque in the post Second World War period, or the high modernist interpretations of modern art in Latin America during the post-War period, the discipline of art history has been shaped by scholarship generated outside the region, as much as from the scholarship generated within it. In this panel we invite scholars to study the effects of a globalized perspective on Latin American Art History, specifically by analyzing the contributions of other regions to the understanding of the concept of Latin American art.  We welcome papers studying any of the topics above, as well as the recent histories that stress critical notions such as race, gender and class to create new readings of Latin American Art History.

To submit a paper proposal, please send a 100-200 word abstract and a c.v. to Michele Greet (mgreet@gmu.edu) and Mercedes Trelles (MERCEDESTRELLES@AOL.COM) by August 7, 2017. Submissions for session proposals are due to LASA by Sept. 7. We will inform you of your acceptance prior to that date so that papers that cannot be included in the panel may be submitted individually.

CFP: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present

1923933798International Conference: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal, 27 and 28 November 2017
Deadline for paper proposals: 15 July

The project “Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations
and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present” emerges from the
collaboration of three research groups engaged in the development of
transnational perspectives in contemporary art history and curating and
in the study of relations between artistic production and migratory
processes – with a particular focus on Latin America and Southern
Europe. More specifically, the organization of this project involves:
the group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art” associated
to the research line Contemporary Art Studies at IHA/FCSH-UNL, the
group “Art in a Global Perspective” at CIEBA / FBAUL and the research
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P),
at the University of Barcelona.

Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic
transits from the 1960s to the present – inscribed in the program of
Lisbon 2017 Ibero-American Capital of Culture – aims at opening a
critical space of debate by engaging art historians, curators and
artists of different generations and nationalities to discuss the role
of different forms of dislocation – such as artistic migrations,
exiles, networking, circulations of ideas and theoretical
articulations, artworks and exhibitions – in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America. In this sense, the very
diverse and heterogeneous set of geographical and cultural areas
incorporated by the term “Latin America” are envisioned here as
specific and at the same time as territories strongly connected with
other locations through a complex network of itineraries, circulations,
appropriations and translations. In this network, different historical,
political and economic processes – among them, colonization and
decolonization – play significant roles. This project seeks to explore
the tensions and interrelations between local inscription and
connectivity, habitation and circulation, present enunciation and
revisiting the past.

Two different actions articulate the project Through, From, To Latin
America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to
the present: an international conference and a set of workshops in the
field of curating, artistic practice and art history. In fact, it aims
to offer different possibilities and forms of engagement to the
participants.

Call for papers
The group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art”
(Contemporary Art Studies – IHA/FCSH-UNL), the group “Arte numa
perspectiva global/Art in a global perspective” (CIEBA/FBAUL) and the
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P)
(University of Barcelona), together with the Program of Lisbon 2017
Ibero-American Capital of Culture, welcome communication proposals from
art historians, curators, art critics and artists for the international
conference Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and
artistic transits from the 1960s to the present (Lisbon, Auditorium of
Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa,
27 and 28 November 2017).
Proposals for communications can address, but are not limited to, the
following topics:
– The role of different forms of dislocation in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America;
– Interrelations between local inscription and connectivity, habitation
and circulation, present enunciation and revisiting the past;
– Analysis of artistic and curatorial projects that relate to the
questions proposed;
– Exploration of South-South transits and circulations between Latin
America, Southern Europe, Africa and Asia;
– Interconnections between artistic networks and social and political
movements since the Cold War;
– Analysis of how artistic and cultural networks interfered with (or
participated in) the geopolitics of Cold War and globalization.

Submissions
This two-days conference invites proposals of up to 400 words for
communications of 20 minutes. Please also include a brief biographical
note (150 words), institutional affiliation (or independent) and your
contact information. All documents sent should be in word or pdf format.
We can only accept one proposal for each applicant.

Proposals should be emailed by the 15th of July 2017 to the following
e-mail address:
americalatinaconferencia2017@gmail.com
The languages of the conference are Spanish, Portuguese and English.

Applicants will be notified of the results of the selection by late
July / early August 2017.

An edited volume with selected papers presented at the conference will
be proposed for publication.

For more in formation please check the website:
http://americalatinaconferenciainternacional2017.weebly.com

CFP: The Artistic Heritage of al-Andalus (Berlin, October 2017)

2017-01-carljusti-logoCFP: The Artistic Heritage of al-Andalus (Berlin, 27-28 Oct 17)
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, October 27 – 28, 2017

Deadline: 28 February 2017

The distinction between own and foreign culture plays a pivotal role in the making of religious, ethnic, and national identities. This was demonstrated by Bernd Roeck in his 2007 introduction to the forth volume in the series Cultural Exchange in Early Modern Europe. Forging European Identities, 1400-1700. Only the resurgence of a majority society and its demarcation against a minority society enables the forming of identity. But what happens in a multi-confessional and multi-ethnic society like the one that existed on the Iberian Peninsula until 1614? Can the foreign repertoire be distinguished clearly from the own at all, or has it not rather become part of a mutual cultural reality?

The history of Spain is defined by phases of cultural opening and seclusion. Whereas Alfonso X and Pedro I furthered the integration of al-Andalus’ art and architecture into the national narrative through their pro-Islamic cultural policy, the staging of a unified Catholic culture became the central topic of painting, sculpture and architecture during the Counter-Reformation. Only from the 18th century, a re-valorisation of the Islamic heritage in al-Andalus took place. Its part in forming a Spanish national identity was subject to controversial discussion on the background of changing historic and political necessities in the 19th and 20th centuries. Simultaneously, architects of the time advertised the Moorish Revival and helped Ibero-Islamic architecture to gain global centre stage. The Alhambrismo not only became one of the most favoured interior styles of the 19th century, but also dominated the Great Exhibitions which regularly took place after 1851. Besides Spain, Prussia (1867), Brazil (1876), or Mexico (1884) presented themselves with a Neo-Moorish exhibition pavilion.

This year’s annual conference of the Carl Justi Association aims to examine selectively the importance of al-Andalus for the forming of national identity from the Middle Ages to the present age. Papers on the following thematic emphases are requested:

– Exchange and confrontation during the Reconquista (1085-1492)
– Stating of a unified Catholic culture during Counterreformation
– Re-valorisation and historiographic debate in the 18th/19th centuries
– Franquismo and national renewal in the 20th/21st centuries

Presentations will have a duration of 20 mins. Languages of the conference are German, Spanish, English. Please send your abstract of max. 300 words and a short curriculum vitae to:
conference@transculturalstudies.ch

CALL FOR PAPERS – FLANDES BY SUBSTITUTION: COPIES OF FLEMISH MASTERS IN THE HISPANIC WORLD (1500-1700) – KIK-IRPA, BRUSSELS – 9-10 FEB 2017

 

COXIE

  • Michiel Cocxie after Hubert and Jan van Eyck, The Adoration of the Lamb, 1558, oil on panel, 133 × 236 cm, signed : “MICHAEL DE COXIE ME FECIT ANNO 1558”, Berlin, Gemäldegalerie

CALL FOR PAPERS

FLANDES BY SUBSTITUTION: COPIES OF FLEMISH MASTERS IN THE HISPANIC WORLD (1500-1700)

Art History Seminar 18 of the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA) Brussels, 9-10 February 2017

On 9 and 10 February 2017 an international conference will be held on the copies of paintings of Flemish masters during the sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries related to the Hispanic world. The event will take place at the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA) in Brussels and is organized in collaboration with the Spanish National Research Project COPIMONARCH: La copia pictórica en la Monarquía Hispánica, siglos XVI-XVIII (I+D HAR2014-52061-P) from the Universidad de Granada.

The artistic heritage of the regions that once formed part of the former Spanish Empire includes a large number of painted copies after Flemish masters made during the sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries. Most of these works have received little attention even though they constitute a valuable source for understanding the artistic influence of the Southern Netherlands on Spanish and Latin American art and society in this period. Indeed, the study of copies of Flemish masters sheds light on a number of art historical issues, including the means of diffusion of artistic models, stylistic trends and the dynamics of the art market and the world of collecting. These copies are a valuable testimony to the political, commercial and cultural ties that existed between the Hispanic territories and the Southern Netherlands.

The conference will focus on the phenomenon of the copy from a large variety of approaches, ranging from workshop practices to collecting, trade and patronage. Papers about studies on particular copies are welcomed, but special attention will be paid to the driving forces behind the export-driven market of copies, such as artists, patrons, collectors and merchants. By taking into account cultural, religious, political and socio-economic dynamics, this conference aims to shed new light on the multifaceted artistic impact of the Southern Netherlands on the Hispanic world during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

We welcome 20 minutes papers that offer new contributions in which recent methodologies and theoretical frameworks are applied to copies after Flemish masters from this period. Proposals can focus both on copies made in the Southern Netherlands to be sent to the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America, and on copies made in these regions.

Candidates are invited to submit their proposals to Eduardo Lamas-Delgado (eduardo.lamas@kikirpa.be) and to the project COPIMONARCH (copimonarch@gmail.com) before 15 September 2016. This should include an abstract (up to 300 words) and a brief CV (max. 1 page).

Further information on the conference will be available from 30 October 2016 on www.kikirpa.be and http://wdb.ugr.es/~copimonarch/eventos/

The conference organisers are unable to cover travel and accommodation costs for speakers. Interested parties should apply for support from their respective institutions.

Committee
Elena Alcalá (UAM, Madrid), Christina Ceulemans (KIK-IRPA, Brussels), Maria Cruz de Carlos (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid), Christina Currie (KIK-IRPA, Brussels), Hélène Dubois (Ghent University / KIK-IRPA, Brussels), Pedro Flor (UAB, Lisbon), Bart Fransen (KIK-IRPA, Brussels), David García-Cueto (UGR, Granada), Pierre-Yves Kairis (KIK-IRPA, Brussels), Eduardo Lamas-Delgado (KIK-IRPA / ULB, Brussels), Didier Martens (ULB, Brussels), Benito Navarrete (UAH, Alcalá de Henares).

Organised by :With the support of :

Art History Seminar 18 of the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA), Brussels, 9-10 February 2017
Institut royal du Patrimoine artistique, parc du Cinquantenaire 1 BE-1000 Bruxelles. Koninklijk Instituut voor het Kunstpatrimonium, Jubelpark 1 BE-1000 Brussel. CONTACT eduardo.lamas@kikirpa.be

CfP: The Matter of Sculpture in Southern Italy, Spain and the New World

El Greco: St Francis Kneeling in Meditation (Art Institute of Chicago)

El Greco: St Francis Kneeling in Meditation (Art Institute of Chicago)

Renaissance Society of America (RSA) 2017 Conference
Chicago, 30 March – 1 April 2017

Call for Papers:
The Matter of Sculpture in Southern Italy, Spain and the New World

The history of sculpture has, particularly with regard to the early modern period, been dominated by studies on marble and bronze, materials that are at the core of traditional art literature. Yet, as Michael Baxandall has shown in his Limewood Sculptors of Renaissance Germany, different materials might be related to different geographies and very different discourses. This session aims to explore the material richness of early modern sculpture, focusing in particular on the axis between the Kingdom of Naples, Sicily, Spain and the New World. More specifically, we are interested in the ways in which different materials might tell different stories about artistic developments, patronage, artists and local traditions, uncover different sources, and create new connections between various geographical areas. The wooden sculptures of Spain are a well-known example; one may also think, among others, of Sicilian wax sculptures, the silver sculptures of Naples, Lecce’s sculptures in the local pietra leccese, or the cornstalk-paste sculptures of Latin America.

Please send proposals to Johannes Röll (roell@biblhertz.it) and Joris van Gastel (gastel@biblhertz.it) by Sunday, 5 June 2016.

As per RSA guidelines, proposals must include the following: paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum).