Category Archives: Call for Papers

Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages (6th-16th century), 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquaryCall for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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CFP: Wider Worlds: Art and Audience Under the Spanish Crown, The Frick Collection, New York, April 5, 2018

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Call for Papers: 
Wider Worlds: Art and Audience Under the Spanish Crown, The Frick Collection, New York, April 5, 2018
Deadline: Dec 12, 2017

Symposium
The Frick Collection, New York

The Frick Collection is pleased to invite submissions for “Wider Worlds: Art and Audience under the Spanish Crown,” a public symposium inspired by the special exhibition Zurbarán: Jacob and His Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle (January 31 to April 22, 2018). Co-organized with the Meadows Museum, in Dallas, where the paintings are currently on view, this exhibition marks the first time that Francisco de Zurbarán’s set of thirteen monumental canvases depicting the family of the biblical prophet Jacob will be displayed in the Americas.

Zurbarán’s paintings were probably commissioned in the 1640s for a monastery in colonial Spanish Peru, where the popularity of this particular iconography drew on histories positing the indigenous inhabitants of the Americas as “lost descendants” of the twelve tribes of Israel. The works traveled to England and, in 1756, entered the collection of the bishop Richard Trevor, an advocate for the rights of Jewish people. This history, as well as the apocryphal story of the paintings’ seizure by pirates, prompts us to think seriously about the afterlives of objects, anticipated versus accidental receptions, and art’s capacity for generating multivalent, sometimes competing, interpretations. For Jacob and His Twelve Sons, those interpretations range from justifying the enterprises of one colonial empire to serving as symbols of religious tolerance in another.

We welcome proposals for twenty-minute papers on the status of the art object and the circulation of objects and ideas in the early modern Hispanic world. Please send a C.V. and 250-word abstract by Tuesday, December 12, 2017, to academic@frick.org. Submissions from emerging scholars, including early career university and museum professionals and advanced doctoral students, are particularly encouraged. Possible lines of inquiry include:

• How artists, patrons, and audiences dealt with anxieties around distance, delay, and the conveyance of meaning in the diverse and multilingual early modern Hispanic world;
• Re-signification and/or halted trajectories in the biographies of objects, especially in a global context;
• The imaging of origin myths and master narratives;
• How Iberia’s Jewish and Islamic pasts were interrogated and reinterpreted in Catholic image practices;
• The issue of workshops, masters, and authorship and their relationship to global markets;
• The global and material turns in art-historical scholarship.

“Wider Worlds: Art and Audience under the Spanish Crown” is convened by Caitlin Henningsen (The Frick Collection) and Adam Jasienski (Southern Methodist University). Susan Grace Galassi (Senior Curator, The Frick Collection) will preside.

Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 2018)

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Diego Rivera, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, 1931, SFAI, San Francisco

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 18)

Deadline: 7 August 2017

The Art History of Latin America has been written, for the most part,  in the 20th and 21st century.  As a discipline it is the product of two distinct points of view: the individual countries’ national art histories and visions generated from other regions, which privilege supra-national conceptions of geography and identity. Be they the Hispanic art histories of the 1930s, the North American passion for Mexican muralism of the 1930s, the European interests in alternative forms of Baroque in the post Second World War period, or the high modernist interpretations of modern art in Latin America during the post-War period, the discipline of art history has been shaped by scholarship generated outside the region, as much as from the scholarship generated within it. In this panel we invite scholars to study the effects of a globalized perspective on Latin American Art History, specifically by analyzing the contributions of other regions to the understanding of the concept of Latin American art.  We welcome papers studying any of the topics above, as well as the recent histories that stress critical notions such as race, gender and class to create new readings of Latin American Art History.

To submit a paper proposal, please send a 100-200 word abstract and a c.v. to Michele Greet (mgreet@gmu.edu) and Mercedes Trelles (MERCEDESTRELLES@AOL.COM) by August 7, 2017. Submissions for session proposals are due to LASA by Sept. 7. We will inform you of your acceptance prior to that date so that papers that cannot be included in the panel may be submitted individually.

CFP: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present

1923933798International Conference: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal, 27 and 28 November 2017
Deadline for paper proposals: 15 July

The project “Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations
and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present” emerges from the
collaboration of three research groups engaged in the development of
transnational perspectives in contemporary art history and curating and
in the study of relations between artistic production and migratory
processes – with a particular focus on Latin America and Southern
Europe. More specifically, the organization of this project involves:
the group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art” associated
to the research line Contemporary Art Studies at IHA/FCSH-UNL, the
group “Art in a Global Perspective” at CIEBA / FBAUL and the research
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P),
at the University of Barcelona.

Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic
transits from the 1960s to the present – inscribed in the program of
Lisbon 2017 Ibero-American Capital of Culture – aims at opening a
critical space of debate by engaging art historians, curators and
artists of different generations and nationalities to discuss the role
of different forms of dislocation – such as artistic migrations,
exiles, networking, circulations of ideas and theoretical
articulations, artworks and exhibitions – in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America. In this sense, the very
diverse and heterogeneous set of geographical and cultural areas
incorporated by the term “Latin America” are envisioned here as
specific and at the same time as territories strongly connected with
other locations through a complex network of itineraries, circulations,
appropriations and translations. In this network, different historical,
political and economic processes – among them, colonization and
decolonization – play significant roles. This project seeks to explore
the tensions and interrelations between local inscription and
connectivity, habitation and circulation, present enunciation and
revisiting the past.

Two different actions articulate the project Through, From, To Latin
America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to
the present: an international conference and a set of workshops in the
field of curating, artistic practice and art history. In fact, it aims
to offer different possibilities and forms of engagement to the
participants.

Call for papers
The group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art”
(Contemporary Art Studies – IHA/FCSH-UNL), the group “Arte numa
perspectiva global/Art in a global perspective” (CIEBA/FBAUL) and the
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P)
(University of Barcelona), together with the Program of Lisbon 2017
Ibero-American Capital of Culture, welcome communication proposals from
art historians, curators, art critics and artists for the international
conference Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and
artistic transits from the 1960s to the present (Lisbon, Auditorium of
Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa,
27 and 28 November 2017).
Proposals for communications can address, but are not limited to, the
following topics:
– The role of different forms of dislocation in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America;
– Interrelations between local inscription and connectivity, habitation
and circulation, present enunciation and revisiting the past;
– Analysis of artistic and curatorial projects that relate to the
questions proposed;
– Exploration of South-South transits and circulations between Latin
America, Southern Europe, Africa and Asia;
– Interconnections between artistic networks and social and political
movements since the Cold War;
– Analysis of how artistic and cultural networks interfered with (or
participated in) the geopolitics of Cold War and globalization.

Submissions
This two-days conference invites proposals of up to 400 words for
communications of 20 minutes. Please also include a brief biographical
note (150 words), institutional affiliation (or independent) and your
contact information. All documents sent should be in word or pdf format.
We can only accept one proposal for each applicant.

Proposals should be emailed by the 15th of July 2017 to the following
e-mail address:
americalatinaconferencia2017@gmail.com
The languages of the conference are Spanish, Portuguese and English.

Applicants will be notified of the results of the selection by late
July / early August 2017.

An edited volume with selected papers presented at the conference will
be proposed for publication.

For more in formation please check the website:
http://americalatinaconferenciainternacional2017.weebly.com

CFP: The Artistic Heritage of al-Andalus (Berlin, October 2017)

2017-01-carljusti-logoCFP: The Artistic Heritage of al-Andalus (Berlin, 27-28 Oct 17)
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, October 27 – 28, 2017

Deadline: 28 February 2017

The distinction between own and foreign culture plays a pivotal role in the making of religious, ethnic, and national identities. This was demonstrated by Bernd Roeck in his 2007 introduction to the forth volume in the series Cultural Exchange in Early Modern Europe. Forging European Identities, 1400-1700. Only the resurgence of a majority society and its demarcation against a minority society enables the forming of identity. But what happens in a multi-confessional and multi-ethnic society like the one that existed on the Iberian Peninsula until 1614? Can the foreign repertoire be distinguished clearly from the own at all, or has it not rather become part of a mutual cultural reality?

The history of Spain is defined by phases of cultural opening and seclusion. Whereas Alfonso X and Pedro I furthered the integration of al-Andalus’ art and architecture into the national narrative through their pro-Islamic cultural policy, the staging of a unified Catholic culture became the central topic of painting, sculpture and architecture during the Counter-Reformation. Only from the 18th century, a re-valorisation of the Islamic heritage in al-Andalus took place. Its part in forming a Spanish national identity was subject to controversial discussion on the background of changing historic and political necessities in the 19th and 20th centuries. Simultaneously, architects of the time advertised the Moorish Revival and helped Ibero-Islamic architecture to gain global centre stage. The Alhambrismo not only became one of the most favoured interior styles of the 19th century, but also dominated the Great Exhibitions which regularly took place after 1851. Besides Spain, Prussia (1867), Brazil (1876), or Mexico (1884) presented themselves with a Neo-Moorish exhibition pavilion.

This year’s annual conference of the Carl Justi Association aims to examine selectively the importance of al-Andalus for the forming of national identity from the Middle Ages to the present age. Papers on the following thematic emphases are requested:

– Exchange and confrontation during the Reconquista (1085-1492)
– Stating of a unified Catholic culture during Counterreformation
– Re-valorisation and historiographic debate in the 18th/19th centuries
– Franquismo and national renewal in the 20th/21st centuries

Presentations will have a duration of 20 mins. Languages of the conference are German, Spanish, English. Please send your abstract of max. 300 words and a short curriculum vitae to:
conference@transculturalstudies.ch