Category Archives: Online Lecture

‘Hidden Gems’, ICOM-ICDAD virtual conference, 15- 16 October 2020, registration is open

The ICDAD 2020 virtual conference looks at “hidden gem” objects, exploring collections from Asia, Europe, the US, and Mexico.

Please click here to register for the conference

About this Event

Every public decorative arts and design collection has hidden corners and unplumbed depths, and many private collections are difficult for outsiders to access during the best of times, much less during a pandemic. As decorative arts and design professionals face the possibility that we might not be able to visit each other’s museums and discuss with colleagues in person for some time, this conference gives us the opportunity to uncover unexpected objects and stories that have not yet been told. Focusing on decorative arts and design collections from around the globe, the 2020 ICDAD conference explores collections recently brought to light, reinterprets beloved objects through a new lens, and shows how technology can make storied historical art newly relevant.

Because this is a global conference, times are listed for New York, Paris, and the local time of each presenter. The schedule is as follows:

Program

Times are listed for New York, Paris, and the local time of each presenter.

DAY 1: Thursday, October 15
Session One
7:00 AM USA Eastern time; 13:00 Paris; 16:00 Ekaterinburg, Russia; 19:00 Taiwan; 20:00 Japan

Naoyuki Watanabe — Oda Collection of 20th Century Design

Annie Ting-An Lin — Objects Betwixt and Between: Objects from the Nationaal Museum van Wereldculturen

Ludmila Budrina — Malachites of the Demidoff Family: Reconstruction of the Collection and Potential Digital Representation

Moderators: Melissa Rinne, Shoshana Resnikoff

Session Two
12:00 PM USA Eastern time; 18:00 Paris; 18:00 Netherlands; 19:00 Finland

Femke Coevert, Dafne Diamante, Aafke Weller, and Maud van Suylen — Panoramas from the Depths of the Rijksmuseum’s Storage Room

Maddalena Napolitani — Balthazar-Georges Sage: The “Hidden Collector” and his Cabinet of Decorative Arts

Leena Svinhufvud and Susanna Thiel — The Design Attic: Investigating Hidden Processes in Designer Archives

Moderators: Kai Lobjakas, Shoshana Resnikoff

Session Three
7:00 PM USA Eastern; 1:00 Paris; 6:00 PM Mexico Central

Rebecca Tilles — Uncovering Hillwood, Washington D.C.’s Hidden Gem

Harrison Schley – The Zalinsky Collection: A Union Soldier’s Trove of Japanese Swords and Art

Claudia Marín — Devotion and Self-Representation in the 18th Century: Arts and Crafts at Museo de Arte Religioso Ex Convento de Santa Mónica

Moderators: Annamarie Sandecki, Shoshana Resnikoff


DAY 2: Friday, October 16
Session Four
9 AM USA Eastern; 15:00 Paris; 14:00 Portugal

Levi Higgs —Mining the David Webb Jewelry Archive

Naoko Adachi — Finding a Place in Museums for Japanese Photograph Albums from the Late-Nineteenth Century

Samantha Coleman-Aller — Hidden Gems: A Rare Group of Irish Glass Pieces

Moderators: Kai Lobjakas, Shoshana Resnikoff

[ONLINE CONFERENCE] Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art and Artists of Late-Medieval and Renaissance Iberia and Beyond, c. 1400–1550

Anonymous Portuguese cartographer, Cantino Planisphere (detail), ca. 1502. Map on parchment, 220 x 105 cm. Biblioteca Estense Universitaria, Modena, Italy. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Thursday 10 December 2020, 1:00 pm – 5:35 pm

Friday 11 December 2020, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Please click here to register for this live online event.

Travelling Objects, Travelling Peopleaims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France, the Low Countries, and eventually Renaissance Italy, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference revisits the dynamics of artistic communication in late medieval Iberia, placing the peninsula in a global network, from Flanders to Florence, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together contributions from international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, this event seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to investigate moments of encounter, conflict, and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.  

Please click here for the speakers, the programme, and additional information.

TONIGHT: Hispanic Society Museum & Library Youtube Live 10pm UK time (5pm EST) | Special Hispanic Heritage Month Tertulia: Treasures on the Terrace

image © The Hispanic Society Museum & Library

Philippe de Montebello, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, will host a conversation via YouTube Live with Patrick Lenaghan, Head of the Department of Prints and Photographs, to explore our new outdoor installation, “Treasures on the Terrace: Highlights from the Hispanic Society Museum & Library.” This special Tertulia (usually available to members) is open to all in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month.

The installation opens on September 24 and features works (in high quality reproduction) from the Hispanic Society collection in a safe outdoor environment at a moment when we are not able to fully enjoy indoor public activities. To complement the installation, there will be an audio component with interesting stories and information about the works.

To watch the talk live please click here

text © The Hispanic Society Museum & Library

Ut Pictura Poesis. An evening of Poetry, Art and Art History, Online Event by the School of History & Heritage, Lincoln University, 2 October, 7 pm BST

To register for this event please click here

Ut Pictura Poesis brings together poets, performers, writers, artist and art historians to discuss their work and research. The programme will include poetry, art, discussion with two art historians. There will be also some time for questions from the audience on the day. Speakers will include:

This event is conjointly organised by the Global and Transregional Studies research group; the Race, Ethnicity and Equality Committee; and the Art History programme of the School of History & Heritage, and generously funded by the HR Equality and Engagement Department from the University of Lincoln.

Recording of BSR Online Lecture: The Iberian and the Other in early modern Rome, with Piers Baker-Bates and James W. Nelson Novoa

In case you missed it, the BSR has shared a recording of last week’s talk by Piers Baker-Bates and James W. Nelson Novoa, The Iberian and the Other in early modern Rome.

BSR Online Lecture: The Iberian and the Other in early modern Rome, TOMORROW, Wednesday 3 June, 18.00–19.30 CET (17.00 UK time)

Click here to register, places are limited (NB 17.00 UK time)

From the British School at Rome:

We are delighted to launch this series of #BSROnlineLectures for all our friends and followers and in the hope of making new ones. Thanks go to all of those who have agreed to contribute to this first series and to colleagues at the BSR who have pulled the series together with such skill and speed. Although we cannot gather here in Rome, we take consolation in coming together online. – Stephen Milner, Director

For different communities, at different times and for different reasons, Rome has always formed an important locus; this discussion will focus on one particular such early modern group.  As the sixteenth-century progressed into the seventeenth, many individual Spanish and Portuguese had made their way to Rome, not only because of its geo-political significance, but also because for a large minority of them it offered a freedom of action that was unobtainable in their own countries. These were the Conversos, Iberians of Jewish descent, who were being gradually and effectively excluded from playing a role in church and state in Spain and Portugal, two countries that were briefly united from 1580. Drawing on our research in Rome, undertaken as historian and art historian respectively, we shall discuss the kind of lives these men (and occasionally women) were able to make for themselves in Rome, what roles they played there, and their importance, out of scale to their number, as patrons of the visual arts both at home and abroad, ranging from El Greco to Velazquez.

Piers Baker-Bates is currently a Visiting Research Associate at The Open University, United Kingdom, having previously been a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the same institution. He is also chair of ARTES, the Iberian & Latin American Visual Culture Group. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in March 2006 and has since held fellowships at a number of institutions, including the British School at Rome and the Dutch Institute in Florence and was an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellow at CASVA in Autumn 2019. This was for his new project: ‘In the Spanish Fashion: Italian Material Culture and Spanish Devotional Practice in the Sixteenth Century’. His book on Sebastiano del Piombo, Sebastiano del Piombo and the World of Spanish Rome was published in September 2016, while articles on Sebastiano have appeared in both edited collections and in journals.  He has also co-authored two edited volumes, The Spanish Presence in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Images of Iberia, with Dr Miles Pattenden, which was published by Ashgate, supported by the CEEH, in January 2015 and “Un nuovo modo di colorire in pietra”: Paintings on Stone and Material Innovation, with Dr Elena Calvillo, which was published by Brill in March 2018. More recently he has contributed an essay and entries to the catalogue of the National Gallery, London, exhibition, Sebastiano del Piombo and Michelangelo, which ran from March to June 2017 and the Uffizi, Florence, exhibition, Spagna e Italia in Dialogo nell’Europa dell Cinquecento, which ran from February to May 2018.

James W. Nelson Novoa is Associate Professor in the department of Modern Languages and Literatures and Medieval and Renaissance studies at the University of Ottawa (Canada). He received his doctorate in Spanish philology from the University of Valencia in Spain in 2003 under the direction of Professor Julio Alonso Asenjo, with a European thesis co-directed by Professor Michele Luzzati of the University of Pisa. He was a postdoctoral fellow of the Foundation for Science and Technology of Portugal (2006–10) and (2011–14). Between 2014 and 2015 he was a researcher in the research project funded by the European Research Council and led by Professor Yosef Kaplan at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem: a transitional diaspora: cultural and religious changes in the Sephardic western communities during the period Modern, Faculty of Humanities, Hebrew University. He is the author of the book Being the Nação in the Eternal City: Portuguese New Christian Lives in Sixteenth Century Rome, Peterborough: Baywolf Press, 2014, of more than 30 peer-reviewed articles and 25 book chapters. Among his areas of academic interest are Italo-Iberian cultural relations in the modern period and the New Christian diaspora in Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.