Category Archives: Online Lecture

ONLINE SEMINAR TONIGHT: The Cloister of Segovia Cathedral: Dislocation, Inheritance and Critique, 6-7:30 pm

Cloister door interior, image: https://www.sahgb.org.uk/whatson/seminar1

In tonight’s talk, Costanza Beltrami explores the long history of the cloister of Segovia cathedral. Shifting the analysis from the cloister’s construction to its conception and relocation, she will discuss such issues as collaboration, competition and conservation.

Please click here for more information and to register.

ARTES and the Zurbarán Centre at Durham University present a 12-week online seminar series, including the annual Glendinning Lecture

We are very pleased to announce that the Zurbarán Centre has teamed up with ARTES Iberian & Latin American Visual Culture Group to organise an exciting 12-week online Research Seminar Series starting on 13 January and running through to 31 March 2021. It provides a forum for engaging with the latest research by national and international scholars who specialise in Iberian and Latin American art and visual culture. The topics are rich and diverse, ranging from Nasrid architecture to twentieth-century art writing on Afro-Brazilian art.

The series also incorporates the prestigious annual Glendinning Lecture in honour of the eminent Hispanist Nigel Glendinning, organised by ARTES with the Instituto Cervantes. The lecture will be given by Professor Jesús Escobar (Northwestern University, Chicago), who will be speaking on ‘All Roads Lead to the Plaza de Palacio: Architecture and Ceremony in Habsburg Madrid’ (17 March).

Furthermore a special seminar (3 March) will be devoted to the collection of the new Spanish Gallery, due to open in Bishop Auckland in the summer of 2021. The series is free and open to anyone interested in the visual arts.

Please email the Zurbarán Centre (Zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk) to register and to receive a zoom link. Please note registration closes 24 hours before the seminar.closes 24 hours in advance of each seminar. Click here for

Text from the Zurbarán Centre newsletter and website

Online book launch: Hispanic Studies, Durham University, Dr Yarí Pérez Marín and Professor Andy Beresford, 3rd December 2020, 5-6pm

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Yarí Pérez Marín, Marvels of Medicine: Literature and Scientific Enquiry in Early Colonial Spanish America 

Marvels of Medicine makes a compelling case for including sixteenth century medical and surgical writing in the critical frameworks we now use to think about a genealogy of cultural expression in Latin America. Focusing on a small group of practitioners who differed in their levels of training, but who shared the common experience of having left Spain to join colonial societies in the making, this book analyses the paths their texts charted to attitudes and political positions that would come to characterize a criollo mode of enunciation. Unlike the accounts of first explorers, which sought to amaze audiences back in Europe with descriptions of strange and astonishing lands, these texts instead engaged the marvellous in an effort to supersede it, stressing the value of sensorial experience and of verifying information through repetition and demonstration. Vernacular medical writing became an unlikely early platform for a new form of regionally anchored discourse that demanded participation in a global intellectual conversation, yet found itself increasingly relegated to the margins. In responding to that challenge, anatomical treatises, natural histories and surgical manuals exceeded the bounds set by earlier templates becoming rich, hybrid narratives that were as concerned with science as with portraying the lives and sensibilities of women and men in early colonial Mexico. 

Andrew M. Beresford, Sacred Skin: The Legend of St. Bartholomew in Spanish Art and Literature 

Sacred Skin offers the first systematic evaluation of the dissemination and development of the cult of St. Bartholomew in Spain. Exploring the paradoxes of hagiographic representation and their ambivalent effect on the observer, the book focuses on literary and visual testimonies produced from the emergence of a distinctive vernacular voice through to the formalization of Bartholomew’s saintly identity and his transformation into a key expression of Iberian consciousness. Drawing on and extending advances in cultural criticism, particularly theories of selfhood and the complex ontology of the human body, its five chapters probe the evolution of hagiographic conventions, demonstrating how flaying poses a unique challenge to our understanding of the nature and meaning of identity. 

Online event hosted by the Royal Academy: Cristina Iglesias in conversation with Norman Foster, RA Architecture Awards Ceremony 2020

Cristina Iglesias, Tres Aguas, 2014. Town Hall Square, Toledo. Photo: Attilio Maranzano.

As part of its Architecture Awards 2020 the Royal Academy will be hosting an in conversation event online via Zoom between the Spanish sculptor Cristina Iglesias and the British architect Lord Norman Foster RA on 3rd December 6.30-7.45pm.

Click here to book and for additional information

The RA will begin by introducing the RA Dorfman Award Finalists and announcing the 2020 winner. Cristina Iglesias will then present a celebratory lecture, exploring her work and its connections to public space, followed by a conversation with the chair of this year’s jury, Norman Foster RA. Ranging from gallery spaces to city squares, their conversation will chart the important public aspect of Iglesias’ work. Following the lecture and conversation, there will be 15 minutes for the audience to ask questions.

Online Lecture: Masters of the Spanish Golden Age: Velázquez, Cano and Murillo, Director of the Wallace Collection and expert on Spanish art, Dr Xavier Bray, 26 November, 7-8 pm

Diego Velázquez, The Lady with a Fan, c. 1640, The Wallace Collection

Talk Description: Among the treasures of the Wallace Collection is a modest but very fine collection of Spanish paintings. They were largely collected by the 4th Marquess of Hertford in the 1830s and 1840s in Paris, when the fashion for collecting Spanish art was at its highest and works by Murillo and Velázquez were much sought after. The 4th Marquess acquired a total of thirteen paintings attributed to Murillo and eight to Velázquez, along with the only known Alonso Cano painting in the United Kingdom.

Although modern day scholarship no longer accepts some of these paintings as fully autograph, the Wallace Collection contains several icons of Spanish art such as Velázquez’s enigmatic portrait of a The Lady with the Fan and Murillo’s exquisite The Marriage of the Virgin, painted on a mahogany panel.

Join Director of the Wallace Collection and expert on Spanish art, Dr Xavier Bray, who will explore the context in which these works were made, whether Spanish ecclesiastical institution or royal palace, and their importance in the wider context of collecting in 19th-century Europe.

Please click here for more information and registration

Online seminar from the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS) in the School of Arts, at Birkbeck University: The destruction of images in the medieval and early modern world: Jews, Muslims, Protestants and Catholics in Iberia, by Professor Borja Franco, 20 November 2020 6-7.30pm

CILAVS warmly invites you to the seminar The destruction of images in the medieval and early modern world: Jews, Muslims, Protestants and Catholics in Iberia
Professor Borja Franco
Friday, 20 November 2020 from 6 to 7.30pm Live Online

 Book your place now

In this paper, Prof Borja Franco presents the main written and visual sources that captured trials for iconoclastic behaviour in medieval and early modern Iberia. He shall explore the reasons for these actions and their political and religious repercussions. A comparative study of the various socio-religious groups reveals that the theological discourse behind each iconoclastic action varied with each case study. Furthermore, it will be shown that iconoclastic attitudes were not the exclusive territory of ‘heretics’ or ‘infidels’ and that even Catholics were persecuted for their hostile attitudes to images.

Borja Franco Llopis is a Professor at the Department of Art History in the UNED (Spain). His research is devoted to the visual and literary representation of the otherness in Southern Europe. He has been a visiting scholar in several prestigious institutions such as the School of History and Archaeology in Rome, the Instituto Storico per el Medievo (Rome), the Warburg Institute (London), Johns Hopkins University, University of California (Berkeley), Harvard University, Columbia University, Universidade Nova of Lisbon and NYU; and Visiting Professor at the University of Genoa. He is Associate Professor at the Department of Art History in the UNED (Spain), the PI of the research group “Before Orientalism. Images of the Muslim Other in Iberia (15-17th Centuries) and their Mediterranean connections” and working Group Leader of the Cost Action 18129: Islamic Legacy: Narratives East, West, South, North of the Mediterranean. He has recently published the monographs titled: Pintando al converso: la imagen del morisco en la peninsula ibérica (1492-1614) (Cátedra, 2019), and Etnicità e conversione. Immagini di moriscos nella cultural visuale dell’età moderna (Affinità Elettive, 2020). He has also co-edited the book: Muslim and Jews made Visible in Christian Iberia and beyond (14-18th centuries) (Brill 2019).


The event is free, although you will need to book.