Category Archives: Webinar

ONLINE TALK: The Maius Masterclass with Prof. Rocío Sánchez Ameijeiras, 10 July 2020, 4pm on Zoom

The second Maius Masterclass will take place on 10 July 2020, 4–5pm on Zoom. We will welcome Professor Rocío Sánchez Ameijeiras (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela), who will explore the theme of visual genres as one of the recurring threads of her academic career.

Please click here to join (you will be asked to register and download Zoom, so we recommend you sign up in advance). You can use your PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone or Android device.

The series is kindly supported by a Hispanex Grant from the Spanish Ministry of Culture and SPAIN Arts & Culture/Embassy of Spain in London.

New webinar series: ‘Museums in the Wake of COVID-19’, presented by Durham University and the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art. First session on Tuesday 7 July 2020, 6.00 pm – 7.00 pm (UK time), via Microsoft teams

image: Durham University and the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art

The Covid-19 pandemic has forced us all to rethink our ways to travel, gather, and socialize. Museums and exhibition venues have not been exempt from necessary adjustments. These four informal early evening conversations are an occasion for reflecting upon the role of social media and the arts during lockdown and upon the challenges that the times post Covid-19 context will pose to the museum experience. They are intended as a dialogue on undertaking or prospect about the dialogue for new initiatives and positive responses to cope with the current uncertainty. 

We are delighted to be discussing these challenges with academics and curators, including representatives from the Real Academia de San Fernando, the Meadows Museum, the Sir John Soane’s Museum, the Bowes Museum, and the Royal Academy of Arts.  

We are pleased to announce below the speakers for our talks, scheduled at 6-7 pm (UK time) every Tuesday in July. Each session will include talks from experts on the topic. The 15-minute presentations will be followed by half an hour of informal conversation with the attendees.

Advanced registration is required for access to the webinar. Please send an email to one of the organisers Elisabetta Maistri (elisabetta.maistri@durham.ac.uk), or to Patricia Manzano Rodríguez (patricia.manzano-rodiguez@durham.ac.uk), both Ph.D. candidates at the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, University College, MLAC, Durham University.

The four sessions will be:

JULY 7: Social Media and the Art Museum

Irene Llorca, José Guerrero and Emma Calvo, Managers of the Covid Art Museum on Instagram.

Isabel Sánchez-Bella Solís, Real Academia de San Fernando (Madrid). 

JULY 14: Temporary Exhibitions after Covid-19 Outbreak

Dr Amanda W. Dotseth, Curator in the Meadows Museum (Dallas, Texas).

Patrizia Piscitello, Head of Exhibitions and Loans in Museo di Capodimonte (Naples).

JULY 21: Impact of Covid-19 in Temporary Exhibitions 

Helen Dorey MBE, FSA, Deputy Director and Inspectress at Sir John Soane’s Museum (London).

Dr Jane Whittaker, Head of Collections at the Bowes Museum (co. Durham).

JULY  28: Educational Mission of Museums and Covid-19 

Dr Rebecca Lyons, Director of Collections & Learning, Royal Academy of Arts (London)

Prof. Nuria Rodríguez Ortega, Head of the Art History Department of the Universidad de Málaga (Málaga).

Leonardo Impett, Bibliotheca Hertziana (Rome) and Durham University (to be confirmed). 

The Maius Masterclass: Inaugural Event with Dr Hilary Macartney, 26 June 2020, 4pm on Zoom

Image: The Maius Workshop

Click here for more information, the schedule, and registration

This series of masterclasses encourages creative dialogue between early-career and established scholars. We have invited historians of art and culture who have challenged established classifications, chronologies and geographies. Discussing texts and objects from their research, they will share experiences of investigating the Iberian and Latin American past, reflect on their academic journeys, and provide both intellectual and practical advice.

Click here for more information, the schedule, and registration

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: ‘Hidden Gems’ Virtual Conference hosted by ICOM-ICDAD (15–16 October 2020), SUBMISSION DEADLINE 1 July 2020

Storeroom – National Palace of Ajuda, Lisbon. Photo: ICOM-ICDAD.

Deadline approaching! ICOM-ICDAD is hosting a virtual conference (previously scheduled to take place in Lisbon) on the theme of ‘Hidden Gems’, which will run October 15 – 16, 2020. They welcome a diverse range of presentations on this topic, exploring everything from hidden collections to underrepresented designers and artists. The deadline for proposals is July 1, and abstracts should be between 250 to 300 words. For more information on the conference and proposal requirements, please view ICOM-ICDAD’s full CFP here.

AMALGAMA Webinar Series: Women artists from Latin America, Spain and Portugal

Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, Frida Kahlo, 1940 (image courtesy of fridakahlo.org)

AMALGAMA is hosting a free webinar series on the work of women artists from Latin America, Spain, and Portugal.

Click here for more details, replays of previous talks, and to register for upcoming talks (NB time zones)

TONIGHT there is a webinar, in Spanish, on Frida Kahlo, Remedios Varo & Ana Mendieta Register here (NB 5pm UK time)

Maius Workshop Meeting: ‘Nature’, 15 June, 6pm (online workshop and call for work-in-progress presentations)

Alejando Cicarelli (1811–1879), Vista de Santiago desde Peñalolén, www.portaldearte.cl/Wikimedia Commons

From the Maius Workshop:

Join us on Zoom at 6:00 pm (London) on 15 June 2020 for the Maius Workshop’s second online event. Please click here to join (please note you will be asked to register and download Zoom, so we recommend you sign up in advance). You can use your PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone or Android device.

As in previous meetings, this workshop will feature short informal presentations followed by discussion. You will be able to present PowerPoint slides or other material remotely, and to join the discussion via voice or chat.

Our line-up includes a presentation entitled ‘Painting Poetry: The Arch of Titus in Rome by Juan Bautista Martínez del Mazo’ by Patricia Manzano-Rodríguez, a PhD Candidate in Art History and Architecture at the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, Durham University.

We invite further proposals for 15-minute presentations related to the theme of ‘nature’, widely considered. Speakers are encouraged to focus their talks on a particular case study (object, extract, document, etc.), which plays a role in their research and can spark creative discussion.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: real and imagined landscapes; ecology and the exploitation of the natural world; human-animal interactions; cartographies; the history of natural science; depicting ‘from life’, realism and naturalism.

If you would like to present your work-in-progress, please email maiusworkshop@gmail.com by 10 June 2020. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome.

BSR Online Lecture: The Iberian and the Other in early modern Rome, TOMORROW, Wednesday 3 June, 18.00–19.30 CET (17.00 UK time)

Click here to register, places are limited (NB 17.00 UK time)

From the British School at Rome:

We are delighted to launch this series of #BSROnlineLectures for all our friends and followers and in the hope of making new ones. Thanks go to all of those who have agreed to contribute to this first series and to colleagues at the BSR who have pulled the series together with such skill and speed. Although we cannot gather here in Rome, we take consolation in coming together online. – Stephen Milner, Director

For different communities, at different times and for different reasons, Rome has always formed an important locus; this discussion will focus on one particular such early modern group.  As the sixteenth-century progressed into the seventeenth, many individual Spanish and Portuguese had made their way to Rome, not only because of its geo-political significance, but also because for a large minority of them it offered a freedom of action that was unobtainable in their own countries. These were the Conversos, Iberians of Jewish descent, who were being gradually and effectively excluded from playing a role in church and state in Spain and Portugal, two countries that were briefly united from 1580. Drawing on our research in Rome, undertaken as historian and art historian respectively, we shall discuss the kind of lives these men (and occasionally women) were able to make for themselves in Rome, what roles they played there, and their importance, out of scale to their number, as patrons of the visual arts both at home and abroad, ranging from El Greco to Velazquez.

Piers Baker-Bates is currently a Visiting Research Associate at The Open University, United Kingdom, having previously been a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the same institution. He is also chair of ARTES, the Iberian & Latin American Visual Culture Group. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in March 2006 and has since held fellowships at a number of institutions, including the British School at Rome and the Dutch Institute in Florence and was an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellow at CASVA in Autumn 2019. This was for his new project: ‘In the Spanish Fashion: Italian Material Culture and Spanish Devotional Practice in the Sixteenth Century’. His book on Sebastiano del Piombo, Sebastiano del Piombo and the World of Spanish Rome was published in September 2016, while articles on Sebastiano have appeared in both edited collections and in journals.  He has also co-authored two edited volumes, The Spanish Presence in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Images of Iberia, with Dr Miles Pattenden, which was published by Ashgate, supported by the CEEH, in January 2015 and “Un nuovo modo di colorire in pietra”: Paintings on Stone and Material Innovation, with Dr Elena Calvillo, which was published by Brill in March 2018. More recently he has contributed an essay and entries to the catalogue of the National Gallery, London, exhibition, Sebastiano del Piombo and Michelangelo, which ran from March to June 2017 and the Uffizi, Florence, exhibition, Spagna e Italia in Dialogo nell’Europa dell Cinquecento, which ran from February to May 2018.

James W. Nelson Novoa is Associate Professor in the department of Modern Languages and Literatures and Medieval and Renaissance studies at the University of Ottawa (Canada). He received his doctorate in Spanish philology from the University of Valencia in Spain in 2003 under the direction of Professor Julio Alonso Asenjo, with a European thesis co-directed by Professor Michele Luzzati of the University of Pisa. He was a postdoctoral fellow of the Foundation for Science and Technology of Portugal (2006–10) and (2011–14). Between 2014 and 2015 he was a researcher in the research project funded by the European Research Council and led by Professor Yosef Kaplan at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem: a transitional diaspora: cultural and religious changes in the Sephardic western communities during the period Modern, Faculty of Humanities, Hebrew University. He is the author of the book Being the Nação in the Eternal City: Portuguese New Christian Lives in Sixteenth Century Rome, Peterborough: Baywolf Press, 2014, of more than 30 peer-reviewed articles and 25 book chapters. Among his areas of academic interest are Italo-Iberian cultural relations in the modern period and the New Christian diaspora in Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

New Online Platform: The Arts Society Connected, launching tomorrow, 11am, with an inaugural lecture on Las Meninas by Jacqueline Cockburn

Diego Velázquez, Las Meninas, 1656, Museo Nacional del Prado

The Arts Society Connected (formerly NADFAS, the National Association of Decorative & Fine Arts Societies) is a new digital platform being launched on 7th April by The Arts Society, the UK’s leading arts education charity. 
Free to both The Arts Society’s 90,000 Members as well as the general public, The Arts Society Connected will host a series of fortnightly lectures by the UK’s leading art historians, as well as film screenings, live author Q&As and a community forum for anyone using the platform. 
The aim of the platform is to help older Members of the population stay connected, educated, entertained and informed over the next three months. The core aims of the charity are to create a better, healthier and more connected society through the power of the arts to nourish and empower. The platform will create a welcoming community for both existing Members as well as the general public.

The Arts Society has moved quickly in response to the COVID-19 crisis to create this digital platform as a large proportion of Members are aged 70 and above and will be forced to isolate over the coming months. The Arts Society consists of 380 individual Membership groups, who organise regular lectures and educational trips to museums and galleries throughout the year. With the inability of Members to meet in person, The Arts Society Connected will ensure that Members are able to stay connected online even while they remain in isolation. 
The Arts Society is working with its directory of Accredited Lecturers to create exclusive video lectures for the new platform. Lectures will be uploaded every other Tuesday at 11am. Members will be encouraged to take part in a community moment, when anyone planning on watching the talk can make a cup of tea at home and join the community forums online for a chat before and after the lecture. The lecturer will also be available to answer questions in the community forums following their lecture.

The platform features an inaugural lectureon Las Meninas by Velázquez by Arts Society Accredited Lecturer, art historian and linguist, Jacqueline Cockburn.

 

Documentary: ‘Titian: Behind Closed Doors’ now on BBC iPlayer

In the winter of 1550 the most famous painter in Europe came face to face with the most powerful man on earth. What emerged from this encounter between Prince Philip of Spain and the Renaissance master Titian is seen as one of the most extraordinary commissions in all of Western art history.

Given almost total creative freedom, Titian was free to explore any subject he pleased. He returned with a set of increasingly dark and explicit images about sexual pursuit, assault and violence. Known as The Poesie, these pictures are admired for their groundbreaking brushwork and innovative composition – yet they remain Titian’s most disturbing and puzzling creations.

Now, coinciding with the National Gallery’s exhibition, which brought the paintings together for the first time in 300 years, we ask why this illusive, dark and often disturbing set of paintings has come to be seen as Titian’s greatest work.

This film includes scenes showing Dr. Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery, closing the exhibition shortly after opening due to COVID-19.

First aired on 4 April 2020, the documentary is available on BBC iPlayer for the next 30 days. Click here to watch.

Online course: Introduction to the Archive of the Crown of Aragon (documents in Latin to ca. 1350), 3rd Mediterranean Studies Summer Online Skills Seminar (12–15 May 2020)

Due to measures taken to reduce the danger of the current COVID pandemic, the University of Colorado Boulder has cancelled on-campus events through May 2020. Nevertheless, an modified online version of the Summer Skills Seminar is planned which will be held via ZOOM. 

Those who attend the 2020 Skills Seminar via ZOOM will have the option of also attending a fuller in-person, on-campus iteration of the skills seminar in May 2021, should this be held (for which we will be reading a different selection of documents).

Overview
The Archive of the Crown of Aragon (ACA) in Barcelona contains one of the largest and richest archival collections relating to medieval Europe, comprising hundreds of thousands of documents, most from the twelfth to fifteenth centuries, and including financial records, royal letters, administrative documents, trial records, treaties, and many other genres and types. The documentation can be used for a whole range of topics including social, economic, political, institutional, gender, diplomatic, cultural and religious history. 

The territories of the Crown of Aragon included much of the Iberian Peninsula, parts of southern France, Sicily and southern Italy, parts of Tunisia and Greece, the Balearics, Sardinia and other Mediterranean islands. It had a large and diverse urban population, was highly integrated into Mediterranean and European trade systems, and had significant populations of Muslims and Jews. It developed one of the earliest and most robust chanceries of medieval Europe; the collections of which have weathered the vicissitudes of history all but intact. Much of the documentation has yet to be used by modern historians. The skills seminar will focus on the Latin-language documentation (from the eleventh to the mid-fourteenth centuries) in the archive’s collections.

This four-day intensive skills seminar will provide participants with an overview of the collections of the ACA, including access to online resources and reproductions, and focus on a hands-on introduction to reading unedited documents from a variety of the archive’s fonds. 

Other topics will include: manuscript abbreviations, dating systems, place and personal names, and research resources and techniques. As much as possible the content will be catered to participants’ interests and needs. Medievalists of all disciplines, graduate students, and qualified undergraduate students, as well as library and archival professionals are encouraged to apply. 

The goal is to provides attendees with a solid preparation for conducting work remotely via the PARES web portal and on-site at the ACA. This will not only aid their research but provide them with a bona fide (in the form of a certificate of completion for those who attend the full seminar), which may be advantageous in securing grants or other funding for research and travel. The ability to do archival research with unedited documents is a skill relatively few doctoral students master, and it enhances the research profile and CV of academic job-seekers.

Participants will find the skills and techniques which the course focuses on useful not only at the Archive of the Crown but at other medieval archives across Spain and Europe.

Applicants should have at least an intermediate level of reading Latin. Those wishing to bone-up on their Latin fluency in advance of the course are encouraged to read the Latin Vulgate and review declensions and conjugations. 

For sample documents, together with transcriptions click here

This Summer Skills Seminar builds on the experience of earlier editions, which participants signaled as “transformative” in terms of their research, and which provided them with an opportunity to network and lay the foundations for future collaborations.

Cost

The cost of the course is: $1000 for Full Professors, Librarians,  Professionals, Independent Scholars; $750 for tenured Associates; $500 for non-tenured Associates and Assistants & Graduate and Undergraduate students; $350 for Adjuncts, Lecturers & Contingent faculty. Members of supporting University of Colorado departments are eligible for a 50% discount. The cost may be tax deductible. Those who pay for the online course will be entitled to attend an in-person iteration planned for May 2021.

Program
The course will be held 13-15 May 2020 from 10am to noon and 1-3pm Mountain TIme via ZOOM

Faculty
The course will be conducted by Prof. Brian A. Catlos (Religious Studies, CU Boulder). A graduate of the University of Toronto’s Centre for Medieval Studies (Phd, 2000) and now a historian of pre-Modern Spain and the Mediterranean, Catlos has been using the collections of the ACA since 1995, primarily for research into the social and economic history of the Crown of Aragon and Muslim-Christian-Jewish relations. 

Important dates:
Application deadline: 1 May 2020
Confirmation of course enrollment: 4 May 2020 
Tuition due: 8 May 2020
Seminar: Tuesday, 12 May – Friday, 15 May, 10am–noon and 1-3pm MST

Apply via this form
For further information or inquiries, contact Brian Catlos (brian.catlos@colorado.edu; subject: “Summer Skills Information”)

This program is organized by the CU Mediterranean Studies Group under the aegis of the Mediterranean Seminar and is made possible thanks to the support of the University of Colorado Boulder.