Closing soon: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern until 9 September 2018


This ground-breaking exhibition features more than 100 paintings, sculptures and drawings by Spain’s best-known artist gives an almost day-by-day coverage of his artistic and social activities during 1932, the year of his first retrospective at the Galerie Georges Petit in Paris. Offering a new insight on Picasso’s ‘year of wonders,’ the show brings together rarely seen masterpieces such as three extraordinary paintings of his lover Marie-Thérèse Walter, created over a period of just five days in March 1932 but separated ever since. 

The exhibition has been curated by Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions, and Nancy Ireson, Curator, International Art, with Laura Bruni and Juliette Rizzi, Assistant Curators, Tate Modern. It is organised by Tate Modern in collaboration with Musée national Picasso-Paris.

Click here for more information.

 

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Job: Assistant Professor (Research): Pemberton Fellowship for the Study of Spanish Art, Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, University of Durham, UK

NNP-DURHAM_CONGREGATION_48This post is full-time and fixed term (1 September 2018 – 31 August 2019).

The Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art seeks to appoint an outstanding candidate to a one-year fixed-term Research Fellowship in Spanish and/or Neapolitan Art of the early modern period (1550-1750). This posts offer an exciting opportunity to make a major contribution to the development of research at the Zurbarán Centre in relation to Durham Castle (University College) at Durham University. The successful candidates will be expected to undertake internationally excellent research. There will also be the opportunity to contribute to teaching in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, with which the candidate will be administratively associated, to a maximum of 6 hours per week. The appointment is tenable from 1 September 2018 or as soon as possible thereafter.

We welcome applications from exceptional scholars with research interests Spanish art of the Golden Age and/or Italian art of the Classical and Baroque period, with a particular focus on major artistic centres such as Rome and Naples; in addition to painting, sculpture and architecture, we welcome applications centred also on decorative arts and garden history. The Pemberton Fellow will be associated with University College, located in Durham Castle, which houses a remarkable artistic collection which includes Spanish and Italian 17th-century art. The candidate will enjoy full board at Durham Castle (including meals and accommodation, subject to income tax and National Insurance deductions) as well as a contribution towards research related expenses.

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Workshop: Transatlantic Spain: the Afro-Hispanic Experience of Slavery and Freedom (15th–19th centuries), Birkbeck, University of London, 6 July 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f463781942f1063291068392f12foriginalThis international workshop aims to contribute to the visibilization of enslaved and free peoples of Afro-Hispanic descent, by exploring their representation in the visual and literary regimes of early modern Spain and the New World, and to generate critical insights into the articulation of slave subjectivities.

This gathering, supported by CILAVS, the Centre of Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies at Birkbeck, University of London is organised by the Transatlantic Afro-Hispanic Study Group, that emerged from the international conference Border Subjects/ Global Hispanisms (Birkbeck, November 2017). The latter was the outcome of the institutional collaboration between the Department of Cultures and Languages at Birkbeck and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. This collaboration has already produced our first publication entitled, Post/Colonialism and the Pursuit of Freedom in the Black Atlantic (Routledge, 2018, ed. J. Branche), the result of an international conference held at the University of Pittsburgh in 2015.

To attend the workshop, please register here.

PROGRAMME

14:30pm-16:00

Jerome Branche (University of Pittsburgh, USA), Love and Affec(ta)tion: Re/Viewing Francisco de Quevedo’s ‘Boda de negros

Francisco de Quevedo’s ‘Boda de negros,’ (in)famous for its conceptista artistry as much as for its anti-immigrant and anti-black virulence, acquires an important historico-existential dimension when considered in the broader context of (Hispano)-Christian religious symbology of the seventeenth century. My paper proposes that the poem’s central trope of marital consummation, the performance of coitus by the black groom, simultaneously speaks to and reveals important additional registers of both sexual and racial dominance. On the one hand, the aromantic and bloody implications of bridal penetration sans affection figure as an early discursive projection of black brutality in Hispanic and western artistic discourse, as also do the poem’s references to cannibalism. On the other, the image of the nail (es/clavo), which he punningly deploys to also identify Tomé, the groom, partakes of the symbology of humiliation, servitude, and death (by crucifixion), that characterize Catholic traditions of mysticism, saintliness and self-negation. My paper proposes that a reflection on the image of the S and the nail deployed here by the poet, ubiquitous in the popular and religious iconography of the time, beyond the symbolism of Christian devotion/abjection, also speaks volumes in relation to the enslaved, incoming Africans, and to the material and epistemic violence visited and potentially visited on their bodies under the aegis of conquest and enslavement.

Baltasar Fra-Molinero (Bates College, Maine, USA), Black Women and the Inquisition: Race, Gender, Healing, and Power

More than two hundred women of African descent were prosecuted by the Inquisition of the Canary Islands between 1505 and 1834. Most cases involved accusations of witchcraft, or its lesser charge, sorcery. The accusations involved healing practices that the religious authorities considered unorthodox. The accusers could be priests as well as lay people who, in some cases, were coerced to testify against these women on the basis of their social reputation as healers outside the legal and professional channels. These women competed against the male practitioners of faculty medicine as well as against curanderosand saludadores, men and women who were authorized to use a mixture of empirical healing knowledge with religious prayers to obtain cures or remedies to the health of individuals or entire groups. This presentation explores the tensions created when Black women in the Canary Islands practiced medicine and magic healing while negotiating their social exclusion due to their gender and race. The reputation some of these Black women gained broke boundaries of religious and social prohibition. The Inquisition moved against many of these Black women on charges both of heresy—use of religious objects and words without authorization—and professional impropriety—practicing medicine without proper faculty—a crime that clearly fell outside the jurisdiction of the Holy Office.

Helen Melling (Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London, U.K.), Contested Visions of Black Wet Nurses in 18th & 19th Century Lima

Portraits of infants alongside their black wet nurses and nannies were incorporated into the family albums of the wealthiest Peruvian and European immigrant families in Lima from the 1860s, coinciding with the immediate post-abolition period in Peru. Although the creole elite’s preference in employing wet nurses of African-descent is examined and contested in late 18th century discourses, their presence in Peruvian visual culture does not arise until the advent of photography, producing the first images to make visible a practice that dates from Peru’s colonial and slaveholding past. The duplicity of these portraits resides in the dissonance between the marginal or supposedly ‘invisible’ presence of the wet nurse, and their centrality in the formation of an elite identity. This tension ruptures the fantasy of masterly ownership and creole ‘whiteness’, with the wet nurse constituting a deeply ambivalent symbol of the socio-racial pedigree of the elite.

16:15-16:30 Break

16.30-18.15

Carmen Fracchia (Birkbeck, University of London, U.K.), The Colour of Freedom in Hapsburg Spain (16th-17th Centuries)

This paper addresses the ways in which visual artists articulate and problematize the hegemonic associations of the appearance of (a) blackness as the social condition of slavery and the appearance of (b) whiteness as the social condition of freedom in the visual form. It will also focus on the hegemonic idea of ‘whiteness’ as the exclusive referent of the concept of humanity and on ‘blackness’ as the referent of Afro-Hispanic counter-culture as articulated in anonymous poems written individually and collectively by enslaved and liberated Afro-Hispanic people in the Spanish black confraternities.

José Miguel López García (University Autónoma of Madrid, Spain), In Pursuit of Freedom: Emancipated, Coartados, and Marrooned in Madrid (1701-1820)

During the Bourbon Dynasty, slaves in Madrid could obtain their freedom through letters of emancipation, deeds of ransom (coartación), or by running away. This paper, based on the analysis of 344 documents from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the early 19th century, considers the different degrees and routes to freedom that slaves could aspire to in a European capital city.

Luis Méndez Rodriguez (University of Seville, Spain), Narratives and Fictions Around Slavery: Towards A New Artistic Imaginary

This work analyzes the elements which defined artistic narratives and which allowed the spread of a visual culture of transatlantic slavery through the Hispanic world from the beginning of the seventeenth century. The Baroque created a set of archetypal images of Afro-Hispanic people, based eitheron their integration into, or their social exclusion from Hispanic societies. In this way, many groups congregated into ethnicbrotherhoods where they found a space to protect themselves from external threats, based on solidarity which allowed their visible participation in the public space. This paper also analyzes a set of images which formed an iconography of slavery. In the artistic context, some slaves not only achieved their freedom but also developed a profession and a certain social recognition. Their presence is studied in the development of a first artistic historiography based on documentary evidence, which also reveals how a fictional discourse of Afro-Hispanic lives was generated in the centuries that followed.

Featured Exhibition: Michel Sittow. Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe, until 16 September at The Kumu Museum, Tallinn

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Born in Tallinn, Michel Sittow, studied in the studio of his father Clawes van der Sittow, a respected painter and wood carver. In 1484, the young artist headed to Bruges, the art centre of the Netherlands at the time, probably to work in the studio of Hans Memling, a German who was the town’s most sought-after master. There he learned the illusionist technique typical of the Netherlandish school of painting.

From 1492 to 1504, Michel Sittow was in the service of Isabella of Castile, and later worked as a portraitist for Philip the Handsome, Margaret of Austria, Ferdinand of Aragon and Christian II of Denmark. Sittow returned to his home-town of Tallinn, first in 1506 in connection with an inheritance dispute, when he joined the local artists’ guild. In 1514, Sittow left for Copenhagen at the invitation of King Christian II, and from there he went on to Spain and the Netherlands. The famous portraitist returned to Tallinn for good in early 1518.
With his diverse heritage (a family with German and Finnish-Swedish roots living in Tallinn) and cosmopolitan career, Sittow did not fit in with the national narrative of art history that prevailed in the first half of the 20th century. However, his cosmopolitan career is all the more relevant in the current European context.

The international exhibition project, which includes multi-faceted collaboration with centres in Europe and the United States, brings Sittow’s extraordinary works from distinguished museums and private collection to his first solo exhibition. This is a unique platform for a broader introduction and further research on the oeuvre of this remarkable artist. Most of Sittow’s small number of works (20 to 25 paintings) are on exhibit, thereby providing an excellent survey of his work as a portraitist and painter of religious works. It also allows us to view his art in a broader context, including in collaboration with Juan de Flandes and other contemporary Netherlandish artists. In addition to the paintings, another section of the exhibition is comprised of a timeline that provides an overview of the 500-year story of Michel Sittow, from his birth and successful career to his fall into oblivion and rediscovery.

The exhibition, which is a collaborative project of the Art Museum of Estonia and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will take place in 2018 in celebration of the centenary of the Republic of Estonia. This year also marks 500 years since Michel Sittow’s final return to his home-town of Tallinn.

Click here for more details.

Tomorrow: Artistic Trade between Spain and its Viceroyalties from 1500 to 1800, King’s College, Cambridge, 22 June 2018

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This is the first conference in the United Kingdom devoted to artistic trade between Spain and its viceroyalties. Referring to Cambridge’s Spanish and colonial art collections and with the indispensable support of the Nigel Glendinning studentship for Spanish studies, this conference brings together scholars specialized in the art from the Spanish Viceroyalties. The speakers will trace the artworks from their production, their movement with the help of agents and their collection and display at their destination. Such approach avoids setting an epicentre and periphery but establishes an equalitarian platform on the movement of art within the Spanish Empire.

8:30- 9:15 – Registration.

Introductory remarks:

9:15- 9:30 – Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

Keynote speaker:

9:30- 10:00 – Luisa Elena Alcalá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Passageways of Art in the Atlantic world: Artists, Patrons and Agents.

  1. Workshops and Artists Producing Art for the Spanish Viceroyalties and Transitory Spaces.

Chaired by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

10:00- 10:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum), Shipwrecked Ivories: The Confluence of East and West.

10:30- 11:00 – Piers Baker Bates (The Open University), Traveling between the Viceroyalties: Artistic Translation in the Sixteenth-century Hispanic World.

11:00- 11:30 – Escardiel González Estevez (Universidad de Sevilla), Alonso Vázquez between Seville, Mexico and Manila (1603-1608): The Paradigm of a “Global Artist”.

11:30- 12:00- Questions.

12:00-13:30- Lunch break.

  1. The Role of Agents Commercializing Artworks between Spain and its Viceroyalties

Chaired by José Ramón Marcaida López (University of Saint Andrews)

13:30-14:00 – Sandra Van Ginhoven (Getty Research Institute, Research Associate), Spanish Transatlantic Agents and the Flemish Guilliam Forchondt in the Overseas Paintings Trade.

14:00- 14:30 – Corinna Gramatke (Technical University of Munich Chair of Conservation-Restoration), “The Portable Europe”: European Artworks for the Jesuit Province of Paraguay (1608-1767).

14:30-15:00 – Eduardo Lamas Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Madrilenian Painters and America: Artistic Production for Overseas Trade Networks and their possible Agents.

15:00- 16:00- Questions followed by a coffee break.

  1. Collecting and Display in Private, Civil and Religious Spaces in the Spanish Viceroyalties.

Chaired by Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)

16:00-16:30 – Kathryn Santner (Leverhulme Trust Fellow, ILAS, London), Conventual Art Collections and Artistic Exchange in the Colonial Viceroyalties.

16:30-17:00 – Isabel Oleas Mogollón (University of Delaware), The Divine and the Self: Uses and Meanings of Mirrors in Quito’s Jesuit Church.

17:00-17:30 – Veronika Winkler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München), Witnessing the Saint’s Life: Patrons and Hagiographical Painting Cycles of Viceregal Peru.

17:30- 18:00- Final questions and closing remarks.

For further information please contact Akemi Herráez Vossbrink at alh64@cam.ac.uk.

To book your place, please click here

ARTES AGM and Prize-Giving Ceremony Report, Oxford, 14 June 2018

home2On 14 June 2018 ARTES held its AGM and prize-giving ceremony in Oxford. It was a day packed with special visits to rarely-seen collections of Spanish art in the city. The day started at Campion Hall, a Jesuit private hall which hosts a fascinating private collection of religious art from Europe, Latin America, and from Christian missions elsewhere in the world.

The visit was followed by the group’s annual general meeting and prize-giving ceremony, held at the Taylorian, Oxford University’s centre for the study of Modern European languages and literatures. Artes presented the following prizes:

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Artes’ honorary president, Sir John Elliott (Regius Professor Emeritus, University of Oxford) with some of the prize winners

The Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal
Awarded to Javier Vicente Arenas (MA Student, Warburg Institute, London), for his essay titled Constructing a ‘Transmediterranean’ Identity: Rodrigo de Borgia’s Italian Angels in Valencia Cathedral (1472-81)

Prizes were also presented to two runners-up: Jamie Haskell (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay titled The Hispano-Moresque Haggadah and Helena Haugli (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay The Botella de Astorga Reliquary and the Transfer, Functions, and Meanings of a Fatimid Rock Crystal in Remote Christian Spain. 

ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholarships

Travel scholarships were awarded to:

Susy Oram, who will travel to Mexico to study Mudéjar art and architecture in the region during the viceregal period.

 

Danielle Smith, CEEH/David Wilkie Scholar for the Study of Spanish Art at the University of Edinburgh, who will travel to Madrid to carry out research for her PhD dissertation, titled ‘Colecciones de Trajes de España: exploring sartorial representation in Spanish printed books, 1777-1825′
Elizabeth Chant, a PhD candidate at the School of European Languages, Cultures, and Society, UCL, who will travel to Seville and Madrid to research ‘Illuminating the Map: Spanish Enlightenment Cartography of the Costa Patagónica
Stefanie Lenk, a curator and PhD candidate at the University of Oxford, who is studying the re-use of Roman altars in paleochristian and Visigothic churches in Spain.
 
This scholarship was awarded to Sylvia Alvares-Correa, who is working on a PhD titled ‘From Flanders to Portugal: the transmission of northern art, artists, and techniques to Portugal through the collection of Rainha Dona Leonor’s (1458-1525)’ at the university of Oxford.

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The day continued with a visit to Magdalen College, founded by William Waynflete in 1458. The College holds wide-ranging art collections, including a Spanish altarpiece representing  Christ Carrying the Cross in the College Chapel. Previously attributed to Valdés Leal, the work, which remains unstudied, was more likely produced by another Sevillian painter in seventeenth century.

Featured Exhibitions: ‘Zuloaga. Character and Emotion’, Centro Cultural Bancaja, Valencia (until 26 August 2018) and ‘Sorolla and Spirituality’ (until 2 September 2018)

ZuloagaZuloaga. Character and Emotion (until 26 August 2018)

This exhibition features some 66 paintings by the Basque artist, several of which are displayed in public for the first time. Ranging in date from 1888, when Zuloaga was 18, to 1945, the works trace the artist’s development from his training in Paris to the mature work inspired by Spanish artists such as Velázquez, Ribera, Zurbarán, Goya and El Greco. The curators, Sofía Barrón y Carlos Alonso, focus on Zuloaga as both a landscapist and a portraitist. They showcase his representations of turn-of-the-century aristocracy, bourgeoisie and intellectuals, as well as his intimate portraits of family members. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue and is organised in collaboration with the Museo Zuloaga in Pedraza (Segovia) and its president, the artist’s granddaughter, María Rosa Suárez Zuloaga.

SorollaSorolla and Spirituality (until 2 September 2018)

This exhibition features the work Yo soy el pan de la vida, exhibited to the public for the first time since its recent restoration, the result of a collaboration with the owners of the work, the Lladró family. Curated by Felipe Garín, the exhibition explores the religious themes which the Valencian artist explored briefly in the earlier part of his career. It comprises six works produced between 1883 y 1899, including ¡Triste herencia!, Monja en oración, Santa ClotildeMesa petitoria, and La Virgen María, all on loan from major public collections.