New and noteworthy exhibition openings in Spain, October 2020

El Greco (1541-1614). Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane or Christ on the Mount of Olives (c. 1600). Colección Pittas.

Obras maestras de la colección Valdés, Museo de Bellas Artes, Bilbao, 7 October 2020 – 1 February 2021.

The first exhibition devoted to the art collection of the Bilbao businessman Félix Fernández-Valdés (1895- 1976), 4 of whose paintings entered the Prado’s collection after his death and others are now distributed around other public and private collections in Spain. The exhibition shows 79 works out of a total of over 400, ranging from the medieval period to the 20th century and include paintings by El Greco, Luis de Morales, Anton van Dyck, José de Ribera, Francisco de Zurbarán, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Juan de Valdés Leal, Carreño, Francisco de Goya, Eduardo Rosales, Mariano Fortuny, Darío de Regoyos, Joaquín Sorolla, Ignacio Zuloaga, Julio Romero de Torres, Daniel Vázquez Díaz, José Gutiérrez Solana. The exhibition reconstructs one of the most important private collections of the second half of the 20th century, and one which was not only rich in ‘Golden Age’ Spanish paintings, but also medieval Spanish art, with a significant triptych by Bernardo Serra, a panel by Fernando Gallego and the triptych from Quejana (in Álava), and works from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Gaudí & trencadís Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia, 2 October 2020 – 31 January 2021.

An exhibition sponsored by the World Monuments Fund which investigates the origin, development and techniques used by the Catalan architect Gaudí to create his signature trencadís, a form of mosaic with which many of his architectural forms were covered. The display shows 53 works, 33 of which are original (four from the Valencian museum) and 20 are reproductions made for didactic purpose, by the conservator Montse Agüero. The exhibition divides into two parts, the first explored the links between the trencadís and ancient mosaic techniques whether as practised by Romans or Venetians, in stone or ceramics. The second section analyses the development of the technique within Gaudí’s work from the Torre Güell, the first building in which he used trencadís, and has a special display about the use of the technique in Valencia itself, especially on its railway station Estación del Norte and on the facades of the houses in the suburb of Cabanyal. A five-minute video in which one of the craftsmen working on the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona explains in Catalan (with Castilian subtitles) how the workshop creates the trencadis for the cathedral spires, is found at https://youtu.be/hSbDvnV9A98

REMINDER: Artemisia Gentileschi Visit to the National Gallery on November 5th

Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Self Portrait as a Lute Player’, c. 1615-17, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut. Charles H. Schwartz Endowment Fund 2014.4.1 © Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

ONLY 2 PLACES STILL AVAILABLE

Please contact Susan Wilson at <susanruddwilson@gmail.com> asap if you wish to attend. 

We are pleased to let ARTES members know that a small visit to Artemisia Gentileschi will take place on Thursday  November 5th at 0915.

Gentileschi spent some years working in Naples (from 1630- until her death, thought to have occurred in 1652, when it was part of the Spanish Empire.) Her  patrons  included Phillip IV and his ambassadors and Viceroys, eg The Duke of Alcala. We thought it made sense to visit the exhibition and follow on developing our understanding of the Spanish in Naples. 

Due to the pandemic places are limited, to 10 only, masks must be worn and social distancing  of 2 metres observed. We cannot form groups as we go through the exhibition. 

If you want to include “Titian” please make an online booking for later that morning as  combining the two exhibitions is not now possible due to the pandemic.

Meet Susan Wilson at the Sainsbury Wing Entrance at 0900 to enter at 0915. 

Latecomers cannot be admitted. NB: If you reserve a place and cannot attend please let me know immediately as we can run a waiting list for this visit, but I would need to swap names over.

Please contact Susan Wilson at <susanruddwilson@gmail.com> asap if you wish to attend. 

New Virtual Tour of Cristo de la Luz in Toledo

In association with ARTES, MAVCOR – the Center for the Study of Material & Visual Cultures of Religion – is delighted to announce the first in a series of virtual tours of buildings around the world.

The tour of the remarkable mosque of Christ of the Light in Toledo, Spain, is freely accessible at https://mavcor.yale.edu/material-objects/giga-project/christ-light-mosque-toledo.  Users can explore the building in three dimensions, with additional texts, images and commentaries by Dr Tom Nickson.

‘Hidden Gems’, ICOM-ICDAD virtual conference, 15- 16 October 2020, registration is open

The ICDAD 2020 virtual conference looks at “hidden gem” objects, exploring collections from Asia, Europe, the US, and Mexico.

Please click here to register for the conference

About this Event

Every public decorative arts and design collection has hidden corners and unplumbed depths, and many private collections are difficult for outsiders to access during the best of times, much less during a pandemic. As decorative arts and design professionals face the possibility that we might not be able to visit each other’s museums and discuss with colleagues in person for some time, this conference gives us the opportunity to uncover unexpected objects and stories that have not yet been told. Focusing on decorative arts and design collections from around the globe, the 2020 ICDAD conference explores collections recently brought to light, reinterprets beloved objects through a new lens, and shows how technology can make storied historical art newly relevant.

Because this is a global conference, times are listed for New York, Paris, and the local time of each presenter. The schedule is as follows:

Program

Times are listed for New York, Paris, and the local time of each presenter.

DAY 1: Thursday, October 15
Session One
7:00 AM USA Eastern time; 13:00 Paris; 16:00 Ekaterinburg, Russia; 19:00 Taiwan; 20:00 Japan

Naoyuki Watanabe — Oda Collection of 20th Century Design

Annie Ting-An Lin — Objects Betwixt and Between: Objects from the Nationaal Museum van Wereldculturen

Ludmila Budrina — Malachites of the Demidoff Family: Reconstruction of the Collection and Potential Digital Representation

Moderators: Melissa Rinne, Shoshana Resnikoff

Session Two
12:00 PM USA Eastern time; 18:00 Paris; 18:00 Netherlands; 19:00 Finland

Femke Coevert, Dafne Diamante, Aafke Weller, and Maud van Suylen — Panoramas from the Depths of the Rijksmuseum’s Storage Room

Maddalena Napolitani — Balthazar-Georges Sage: The “Hidden Collector” and his Cabinet of Decorative Arts

Leena Svinhufvud and Susanna Thiel — The Design Attic: Investigating Hidden Processes in Designer Archives

Moderators: Kai Lobjakas, Shoshana Resnikoff

Session Three
7:00 PM USA Eastern; 1:00 Paris; 6:00 PM Mexico Central

Rebecca Tilles — Uncovering Hillwood, Washington D.C.’s Hidden Gem

Harrison Schley – The Zalinsky Collection: A Union Soldier’s Trove of Japanese Swords and Art

Claudia Marín — Devotion and Self-Representation in the 18th Century: Arts and Crafts at Museo de Arte Religioso Ex Convento de Santa Mónica

Moderators: Annamarie Sandecki, Shoshana Resnikoff


DAY 2: Friday, October 16
Session Four
9 AM USA Eastern; 15:00 Paris; 14:00 Portugal

Levi Higgs —Mining the David Webb Jewelry Archive

Naoko Adachi — Finding a Place in Museums for Japanese Photograph Albums from the Late-Nineteenth Century

Samantha Coleman-Aller — Hidden Gems: A Rare Group of Irish Glass Pieces

Moderators: Kai Lobjakas, Shoshana Resnikoff

[ONLINE CONFERENCE] Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art and Artists of Late-Medieval and Renaissance Iberia and Beyond, c. 1400–1550

Anonymous Portuguese cartographer, Cantino Planisphere (detail), ca. 1502. Map on parchment, 220 x 105 cm. Biblioteca Estense Universitaria, Modena, Italy. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Thursday 10 December 2020, 1:00 pm – 5:35 pm

Friday 11 December 2020, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Please click here to register for this live online event.

Travelling Objects, Travelling Peopleaims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France, the Low Countries, and eventually Renaissance Italy, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference revisits the dynamics of artistic communication in late medieval Iberia, placing the peninsula in a global network, from Flanders to Florence, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together contributions from international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, this event seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to investigate moments of encounter, conflict, and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.  

Please click here for the speakers, the programme, and additional information.

CFP: ‘Decentering Realisms, 1750–Now’, Virtual Conference (The Courtauld Institute of Art), with a related online reading group (details below)

Conference date: Friday 12 and Saturday 13 March 2021

Proposals due: 16 November 2020

This conference will explore realism in art across the world, from the mid-eighteenth century to the present day. Seeking to decentre conventional art histories of realism which anchor the concept in nineteenth-century Europe and to open it up to redefinition, this conference will gather together scholars and artists working on all modern periods and all geographies: from 1750 to the present; from Asia, Africa, South America, North America, Australasia and Europe. The conference will ask how far and in what ways can art from across the world be comprehended under the expanded term ‘realism’? 

Realism is a notoriously slippery but pervasive and persistent concept that transcends style and medium, and which encompasses many forms of representation. It is a keyword of established art historical methodologies but it is also much more than this, it has proved to be a highly flexible term that is embedded in the terminologies of many distinct traditions and avant-gardes around the world. We are curious about how realism intersects with different forms of naturalism and how it can also extend to abstraction. At its core realism is often about capturing and intervening in something of the artist’s contemporary social reality through a set of aesthetic conventions. We are calling this the ‘realist effect’. Our expertise in realism within a European context has made us aware of tensions, ambiguities and paradoxes underpinning the term. We want to explore whether comparable and different ambiguities lie behind the term’s enduring, widespread appeal. Our aim is to bring art histories of realism in line with the geocultural expansion of the discipline, while at the same time seeking alternative understandings of this phenomenon to those offered by the politics and epistemologies of globalisation.

Questions asked by this conference include: how does art from different geographies and time periods purport to represent reality? What does the realist effect look like in different geographies, traditions and avant-gardes? We seek to explore the ways realism is receptive to a variety of progressive politics and what happens when different pictorial conventions of the real interact, dominate and subvert one another. For example, how did photography respond to and alter realist conventions as the technology was adapted across the world? In addressing the ‘here and now’, how does realist art negotiate the past and the future? What versions of reality are being imagined by realist art? What are the politics, philosophies and mythologies behind this reification, this making real?

By bringing together scholarship on art from across the world and spanning over two centuries this conference aims to widen the lens through which realism is currently understood and to conceptualise planetary realisms. We are also interested in receiving proposals for papers which disrupt or challenge the period parameters of this project as we have indicated them, recognising that realisms pre-existed and cut across (and even outlast) western chronologies.

Papers might address works of art of any medium, as well as theories and philosophies of art. Please send a title and abstract of your proposed paper (around 300 words) to Rachel Stratton (Rachel.Esther.Stratton@gmail.com) and Thomas Hughes (Thomas.Hughes@courtauld.ac.uk) by 16th November, 2020.

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We are assembling an online reading group in conjunction with this conference.  While the global pandemic has physically grounded many of us it has opened up opportunities for online conversations across international boundaries, which will prove essential for the mission of this project. We warmly extend invitations to join and would ask you to recommend readings considering the above and related topics. If you are interested please email Rachel and Thomas.

Upcoming Exhibition – Mariana Castillo Deball: Between making and knowing something at Modern Art Oxford (2 October 2020 – 3 January 2021)

View of the artist’s studio, 2020. Image courtesy Mariana Castillo Deball via Modern Art Oxford

Through a collage-like installation featuring pottery, photography and textiles, Mexican-born artist Mariana Castillo Deball works to uncover stories and individuals often hidden in traditional museum displays.

For more information and to book a free ticket, please click here.

Text and image from Modern Art Oxford