TOMORROW: Zurbarán Centre/ARTES Seminar Series, 3 November, 6.00 PM | Adam Jasienski, ‘Hablando a nuestro modo’: Art and Didacticism in Early Modern Hispanic Writing

We are pleased to announce that the fourth seminar of the Zurbarán Centre-ARTES autumn Research Seminar Series will take place on Wednesday, 3 November at 6.00 PM (GMT).    

Adam Jasienski, ‘Hablando a nuestro modo’: Art and Didacticism in Early Modern Hispanic Writing

Discussions of painting and sculpture permeate early modern Spanish books of jurisprudence, religious doctrine, and political history. Why did writing about the making and viewing of art, broadly understood, lend itself to discussing difficult concepts in non-artistic fields? Painting and sculpture were intellectual endeavors that mediated between human and divine realms but they were also artisanal and handmade. This duality granted them broad conceptual applicability, encouraging numerous thinkers to deploy them metaphorically in the service of epistemology.

Please register here: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=i9hQcmhLKUW-RNWaLYpvlNMF-qNhnXNCmAShgOHLsKdUREU0M0RJTjAzSUpIVlFaTzZWRlQzSlQwSy4u

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

Luisa Roldán – Recording of the online discussion/book launch and a special offer to purchase the book now available

For those who missed it, please find the recording of the book launch for the new monograph, Luisa Roldán. Author Catherine Hall-van den Elsen was joined in conversation by ARTES co-founder Holly Trusted to explore the life and works of this celebrated sculptor of the Spanish Golden Age

Recorded talk published on Lund Humphries’ youtube channel

Order the book:

Customers in the UK and rest of the world (excluding North America) can order from Lund Humphries. Customers in North American can order the book from Getty Publications.

Special Offer:

To celebrate the launch of the first volume in the new series Illuminating Women Artists, both Lund Humphries and Getty Publications are offering a 20% discount on copies of Luisa Roldan. Enter code WomenArtists20 at checkout to apply the discount. Valid until end 31 October 2021.

For more information on Lund Humphries books and events sign up to their monthly newsletter here.

Zurbaran Centre-ARTES Seminar, 20 October, 6.00 PM | Lisandra Estevez, Jusepe de Ribera’s Otherness: Identity and Representation in Early Modern Iberian Art

We are pleased to announce that the second seminar of our autumn online Research Seminar Series will take place on Wednesday, 20 October at 6.00 PM, UK time:   

Lisandra Estevez: Jusepe de Ribera’s Otherness: Identity and Representation in Early Modern Iberian Art

This talk takes a closer look at Ribera’s otherness as an artist. It first considers Ribera’s marginalized status in Spain, possibly because of his Morisco (converted Muslim) or Converso (converted Jewish) ancestry. The artist was painfully cognizant of his low status and commented on Spain’s ill-treatment of him “as a cruel stepmother to her children,” as famously recorded by the art theorist and painter Jusepe Martínez. While his ancestry remains speculative, specific biographical details have suggested that he might have been of Morisco ancestry. Second, Ribera’s subject position as an “other” informed his interpretation of innovative and unconventional content. In specific, this presentation will consider Ribera’s representations of Turkish men, such as his drawing of The Turkish Dignitary and other Figures (1630s, Madrid, Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando) and A Potentate Accompanied by His Halberd Bearer, c. 1625-1630, Los Angeles, J. Paul Getty Museum). These proto-orientalist images have often been deemed fanciful or exotic, but a closer look at them reveals complex European and non-European identity constructs, respectively. Moreover, as an artist who might have left Spain due to social prejudices yet who promoted himself as a Spanish artist working in the Iberian dominion of Naples under the protection of its viceroys, Ribera paradoxically occupies a third or “in-between” space. Arguably, this intersectionality merits further introspection.

You can join the seminar by clicking on the following zoom link: https://durhamuniversity.zoom.us/j/92019390916?pwd=aVd1ZGFUVm96T01yRzFrQkNIVWtJZz09

Meeting ID: 920 1939 0916

Passcode: 017679

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

TONIGHT: ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre Seminar Series begins with a talk on the Factum Foundation at the Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland: Rethinking the relationship between Authenticity and Originality, 6pm BST

Join us tonight for the first talk in our ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre 2021 Autumn Seminar Series

Adam Lowe and Charlotte Skene Catling: In Ictu Oculi – In the Blink of an Eye. Rethinking the relationship between Authenticity and Originality

The seminar introduces the innovative exhibition display curated by the Madrid-based Factum Foundation and Skene Catling de la Peña at the new Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland, which incorporates a collection of facsimiles of paintings, sculptures and architecture. Among them are the sepulchre of Cardinal Tavera by Alonso Berruguete, a sculpture of the risen Christ by El Greco in its tabernacle from the Hospital de Tavera, the memento mori paintings by Valdés Leal from the Hospital de la Caridad, carvings and tiles from various buildings, such as the Casa de Pilatos.

This thought-provoking talk will address issues of technology, new approaches to museum display, aura and authenticity, whilst also providing insights into the creativity and thinking that underpinned the visual arts in early modern Spain.

You can join the seminar by clicking on the following zoom link: https://durhamuniversity.zoom.us/j/92019390916?pwd=aVd1ZGFUVm96T01yRzFrQkNIVWtJZz09

Meeting ID: 920 1939 0916

Passcode: 017679

For further information on Factum Foundation and their work at the Spanish Gallery (due to open on 14 October), please see: https://www.factumfoundation.org/ind/627/the-auckland-project

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

2021 ICMA Forsyth Lecture Online: Julia Perratore, Assistant Curator, The Met Cloisters, ‘Representing Medieval Spain at The Met Cloisters’, Thursday, 14 October 14, 1-2 PM CT / 2-3 PM ET / 7-8 PM BST

Fuentidueña Chapel Gallery, The Met Cloisters, Copyright © 2021 International Center of Medieval Art.

Please click here to register.

Communities of Christians, Muslims, and Jews lived side by side in Spain for centuries, creating vibrant artistic traditions that often intersected. At The Met Cloisters, however, interactions between faiths in the medieval Iberian Peninsula have not always been visible. In the Forsyth lecture, Julia Perratore, Assistant Curator of Medieval Art, The Met Cloisters, will discuss the process of planning and implementing Spain, 1000-1200: Art at the Frontiers of Faith, an exhibition which addresses this aspect of the museum’s permanent display.

For the first time since its inauguration at The Cloisters in 1961, the Fuentidueña Chapel gallery, which typically focuses on the Christian tradition, will present a group of works that testify to the diversity of Spanish medieval art. By telling a more nuanced story in this space, the exhibition demonstrates the ease with which objects and artistic ideas transcended differences of belief. Placed in dialogue with each other, the silk textiles, ivory carvings, illuminated manuscripts, frescoes, and monumental sculptures featured in the show reveal a dynamic, interconnected past that often mirrors the present. The exhibit opened on August 30, 2021, and will continue through January 30, 2022.

The webinar is made possible by the International Center of Medieval Art’s Forsyth Lecture fund with additional support from the UA Department of Art and Art History Visiting Artists and Scholar lecture fund.

Local Organizer: Jennifer M. Feltman, The University of Alabama, Department of Art and History, in collaboration with Erika Loic, Florida State University, Department of Art History

Hosted by The University of Alabama

For more info, see https://art.ua.edu/news/cloisters-curator-to-speak-on-medieval-spain/

The ICOM-ICDAD 2021 Virtual Conference, ‘Revivals’, is open for registration

Please see the conference’s Eventbrite page to register.

Attendance is open to anyone regardless of ICDAD membership, but we urge attendees to join ICDAD to enjoy the full benefits of membership. 

Please note: when you register, you will receive a confirmation email that includes a Zoom link that is valid for all three days of the conference. 

The schedule is below (NB: all start times are listed for Paris and New York, respectively):

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21

16:00 Paris // 10:00 AM USA Eastern

Opening Remarks

Session 1: Creating History

Lieske Huits — “Modern Ornaments” or “Models of Ancient Production”? Egyptian Revival Jewelry from the Brogden Album

Martina Pall — The Revival of Chivalry in the 19th Century, Using the Example of a Room Stove

Christian Hörack — The Goldsmith Studio Bossard in Lucerne, a Swiss Contribution in the Age of Historicism

17:30 Paris // 11:30 AM USA Eastern

Session 2: ICDAD General Meeting

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22

14:00 Paris // 8:00 AM USA Eastern

Session 1: Material

Ludmila Budrina — Russian Tradition of the Artistic Application of Hard Stone (“pietra dura”)

Anaïs Alchus & Edouard Papet — Reconsidering an Icon of Revivals: the Life-Size Biscoúit Porcelain Statue of Bernard Palissy by Gille Jeune (1860)

Samantha Coleman — The Viennese Enamel Revival Objects in the Medeiros e Almeida Collection

15:30 Paris // 9:30 AM USA Eastern

Session 2: Cultural Identity

Virginie Desrante — Sèvres Porcelain Manufactory Heritage in the 19th Century: New Thoughts on Néo-Sèvres by Sèvres

Mark Sagona — Baroque Revival Currents in the Decorative Arts in Malta,1870-1900

Susan Rawles — Home-Making: Nostalgia and The Country House Style

10:45 Eastern/16:45 Paris

Session 3: 20th and 21st Century Revivals

Melinda Farkasdy — The Verőce Super Group: Emerging Ceramists, and The Passion for Wood Fired Pottery

Kim Mawhinney — Parian Porcelain to Political Power: The Influence of the Belleek Pottery on Contemporary Artists

Christian Roden — A Museum Makes Landfall: The Kungsholm, The American Swedish Historical Museum, and the Rise of Swedish Design in America

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23

8:00 Eastern USA/14:00 Paris

Session 1: National Romanticism

Cristina Neiva Correia — Revivals Fit for the King of Portugal: A Pair of Vases with Celebrities of the 15th and 16th centuries, by Sèvres

Ludmila Dementieva — “Encyclopedia” of Styles in the Objects of Russian Artistic Metal from the Collection of State Historical Museum

Anna-Sophie Laug — Rural Revival 1900: Vernacular Aesthetics in European Decorative Arts Between Historicism and Art Nouveau

TOMORROW: Webinar – Jesús Porres (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid), ‘De Sevilla a Edimburgo: genesis y recorrido de La Vieja Friendo Huevos’, organised by the Spanish Consulate in Edinburgh, 11 October, 5pm

The “Old Woman Frying Eggs”, Diego Velázquez’s masterpiece, can be admired at the Scottish National Gallery. It is one of those unmistakable Spanish-Scottish connections we like to revisit through our online cultural seminars. Professor Jesús Ángel Porres, from Rey Juan Carlos University, will tell us about the artistic environment in Seville at the beginning of the 17th century, when the painting saw the light. He will be introduced by Aidan Weston-Lewis, head of the European Collection at the National Gallery of Scotland, who will speak about the painting’s vicissitudes before reaching the National Gallery.

Please click here to register and receive a link

Meadows Museum Virtual Events Fall 2021

The Meadows Museum, Dallas is hosting a series of online events this fall, open to all and accessible from around the world. NB the time zone for the events.

FURTHER AFIELD VIRTUAL TALK: Incarnating Black Sanctity: Fleshtones and “Lifelikeness” in Baroque Spanish Sculpture 

Erin Rowe, associate professor of history, Johns Hopkins University 

OCTOBER 5 | 12:00 pm CDT (6:00 pm BST)

Further Afield provides broader social, political, economic, and historical context for works of art at the museum. This fall, Further Afield focuses on early modern Spain, or the time period from roughly 1500 to 1800. These 45-minute talks take place exclusively online. This talk explores the contrast between representations of Black and White saints in Baroque Spanish polychromed sculpture. The process of painting fleshtones was key to Baroque artistic techniques of creating lifelike figural sculpture. Examining the distinct artistic choices made in painting fleshtones for Black and White saints reveals the spiritual meanings artists wished to convey about blackness and holiness. 

$5; free for members and SMU faculty/staff/students 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/virtual-talk-further-afield-incarnating-black-sanctity-tickets-161011893909?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

MOVIES WITH THE MEADOWS: The Disenchantment (El Desencanto) (1976), directed by Jaime Chavarri 

Aaron Shulman, author 

OCTOBER 7 | 12:00 pm CDT (6:00 pm BST)

Movies with the Meadows pairs scholar and screen. Registration includes a link to stream the film at your leisure October 6–8 and a link to a live Zoom talk on October 7 to explore the film in more depth with Aaron Shulman, author of The Epic Story of Spain’s Most Notorious Literary Family and the Long Shadow of the Spanish Civil War (2019). The cult documentary El Desencanto (The Disenchantment) is the collective story of the Paneros, a brilliant and tormented Spanish family whose eccentricities, incendiary declarations, and taboo-smashing exhibitionism turned them into a cultural phenomenon in Spain in 1976, when this film was released. A national classic, it is esteemed and remembered both for the role it played in the country’s transition to democracy and for the singular testimonies of the Panero family.

FREE 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/movies-with-the-meadows-the-disenchantment-el-desencanto-tickets-161013747453?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

LUIS MARTÍN LECTURE SERIES IN THE HUMANITIES: Scratching the Surface: A History of Paintings Conservation 

Claire Barry, Director of Paintings Conservation Emerita, Kimbell Art Museum 

FRIDAYS, OCTOBER 15–NOVEMBER 12 | 10:30 am CT (NB Daylight savings in UK ends on 31/10/21)

This lecture series will use case studies to illuminate the evolution of conservation practices and theory over time. Five topics will be explored: painting materials; examination techniques; structural work; cleaning and varnishing; and compensation of losses. Throughout the series, the important role that collaboration between conservator, curator, and conservation scientist plays in decisions in the treatment of paintings will be discussed. The importance of conservation training, proper documentation, and the practice of reversibility in conservation treatment will be examined as individual case studies are explored. This program is made possible by gifts from the Fannie and Stephen Khan Charitable Foundation and the Eugene McDermott Foundation.

$60; free for members and SMU faculty/staff/students 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/zoom-ticket-scratching-the-surface-a-history-of-paintings-conservation-tickets-164148218741?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

LECTURE: Fashion and Fantasy in Eighteenth-Century France and Spain

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell, fashion historian, curator, and journalist 

OCTOBER 22 | 6:00 pm CDT (Midnight BST)

During Spain’s Golden Age, its fashions were admired and imitated across Europe. But the decline of Spanish power and the ascendancy of France under Louis XIV shifted the axis of fashion, art, and culture to Paris. Eighteenth-century travelers remarked that Spanish women dressed in “modern French fashion.” But their French counterparts increasingly looked to Spain’s past glories for inspiration. Neither antique nor modern, traditional Spanish costume was a picturesque and timeless alternative to the increasingly fickle fashions of the era, inspiring masquerade, theater, and court costumes as well as genre scenes and portraits à l’espagnole. Once easily distinguishable from French fashion, Spanish style began to permeate everyday dress and by the reign of Louis XVI, even the royal family embraced the new Spanish-accented rustic elegance. This lecture will explore the relationship between French and Spanish fashion during the eighteenth century. This program is sponsored by the Cultural Office of the Embassy of Spain.

$10; free for members and SMU faculty/staff/students 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/zoom-ticket-lecture-fashion-fantasy-in-18th-century-france-spain-tickets-157967427829?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

FURTHER AFIELD VIRTUAL TALK: Captive Objects: Catholic Artifacts Across the Early Modern Mediterranean 

Daniel Hershenzon, associate professor; Department of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages; University of Connecticut

NOVEMBER 2 | 12:00 pm CDT (5:00 pm GMT)

Further Afield provides broader social, political, economic, and historical context for works of art at the museum. This fall, Further Afield focuses on early modern Spain, or the time period from roughly 1500 to 1800. These 45-minute talks take place exclusively online. Catholic artifacts—rosaries, relics, paintings, and more—circulated in the thousands in the early modern, western Mediterranean, crisscrossing religious boundaries. This mobility was largely a byproduct of piracy, to which 2–3 million Christians and Muslims fell fate between 1500 and 1800. This talk examines how objects trapped in the plunder economy became the center of the conflicting claims made by Catholic captives, renegades (captives who had converted to Islam), Moroccan sultans, and Algerian pashas. We will see how captivity transformed religious artifacts into religious boundary markers within and among religions. 

$5; free for members and SMU faculty/staff/students 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/virtual-talk-further-afield-captive-objects-catholic-artifacts-tickets-161012471637?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

LECTURE: Making It: Creating Fashion in Early Modern Europe 

Annette Becker, director and curator, UNT CVAD Texas Fashion Collection 

NOVEMBER 18 | 6:00 pm CST (Midnight GMT)

Have you ever wondered how delicate, handmade lace was created, or how stiff ruffs stayed so crisp and white? And before department stores and boutiques, how did gentleman procure elaborately embroidered suits? In celebration of the exhibition Canvas & Silk: Historic Fashion from Madrid’s Museo del Traje, join Texas Fashion Collection director Annette Becker in an exploration of the lives of garments from the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. Together we’ll discover the surprisingly laborious and often creative processes of commissioning, creating, and caring for garments represented in portraiture and featured in the exhibition, allowing us a greater understanding of how people’s lives were intertwined with clothing. This program is sponsored by the Cultural Office of the Embassy of Spain.

$10; free for members and SMU faculty/staff/students 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/zoom-ticket-making-it-creating-fashion-in-early-modern-europe-tickets-161011653189?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

FURTHER AFIELD VIRTUAL TALK: Dressing the Court of Philip IV 

Amanda Wunder, associate professor of early modern European history, City University of New York (CUNY)-Lehman College 

DECEMBER 7 | 12:00 pm CST (6:00 pm GMT)

Further Afield provides broader social, political, economic, and historical context for works of art at the museum. This fall, Further Afield focuses on early modern Spain, or the time period from roughly 1500 to 1800. These 45-minute talks take place exclusively online. The court of Philip IV (1621–1665) is best remembered today for the extreme fashions that were immortalized in the paintings of Diego Velázquez, most memorably in his iconic masterpiece Las Meninas. This talk goes behind the scenes in the Royal Palace to investigate the lives and works of the court artisans—tailors, embroiderers, shoemakers, and others—who dressed Philip IV and his family and played a crucial, if long-forgotten, role in shaping court culture in seventeenth-century Spain. 

$5; free for members and SMU faculty/staff/students 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/virtual-talk-further-afield-dressing-the-court-of-philip-iv-tickets-161012750471?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

FURTHER AFIELD VIRTUAL TALK: Mother, Daughter, Widow, and Wife: The Conundrum of Mary in Early Modern Hispanic Art 

Charlene Villaseñor Black, professor of art history and Chicana/o studies, UCLA 

JANUARY 11 | 12:00 pm CST (6:00 pm GMT)

Further Afield provides broader social, political, economic, and historical context for works of art at the museum. This fall, Further Afield focuses on early modern Spain, or the time period from roughly 1500 to 1800. These 45-minute talks take place exclusively online. Marian devotion is grounded in a conundrum: Mary is both exemplary and ordinary, superior to all other women and a conventional mother, daughter, widow, and wife. Focusing on this paradox in the seventeenth-century Hispanic world, this talk asks: How did sacred artworks serve as visual exemplars of gendered behaviors? How did artists, patrons, and devotees negotiate the contradictions at the heart of Marian veneration? 

$5; free for members and SMU faculty/staff/students 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/virtual-talk-further-afield-mother-daughter-widow-and-wife-tickets-161013139635?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

CFP: ‘Crafting Medieval Spain: the Torrijos ceilings in context,’ session at the 2022 Association for Art History Annual conference, deadline 1 November 2021

Carved and gilded wooden ceiling from the Palacio de Torrijos, prov. Toledo (Spain), c. 1490, V&A: 407-1905 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

This session will explore the legacy of Islamic art in Europe through its medieval ceilings, many of which are dispersed as architectural fragments in contemporary museums. It will focus on the case study of the Torrijos ceilings, four monumental wooden ceilings that were commissioned in the 1490s by a couple close to the Catholic Monarchs, for their palace in Torrijos near Toledo (Spain). The ceilings were separated in 1904 when the Torrijos palace was dismantled, and they are now dispersed across collections in Europe and the USA. Despite their significance to histories of both Islamic and European art, these important objects remain under-explored. As objects made using techniques and motifs associated with Islamic craftsmanship, the Torrijos ceilings are not considered European enough to sit within western art history; on the other hand, their commission for a Christian-owned palace using a style adapted to Gothic taste means that neither are they considered within Islamic art history.

Drawing from a new interdisciplinary BA/Leverhulme funded research project with these ceilings at its heart, this panel invites papers that more fully contextualise the ceilings and their role in understanding the complex history of Islamic art in Europe. We seek to discuss the circumstances of the ceilings’ original making and decorative choices; the relationship of their carpentry techniques to earlier traditions, especially in the wider Islamic world; their fragmentation and acquisition, in the wider context of the dispersal of Spain’s cultural heritage in the late 19th and 20th centuries; their modes of display, and the potential for these ceilings to foster a new understanding of Spain’s medieval craftsmanship among contemporary museum-going publics.

Mariam Rosser-Owen, Curator Middle East, Victoria and Albert Museum, m.rosserowen@vam.ac.uk, @mrosserowen

Anna McSweeney, Lecturer in History of Art and Architecture, Trinity College Dublin, mcsweean@tcd.ie

For more information, please see the CFP and the Crafting Medieval Spain project’s website

Call for Papers deadline 1 November 2021. Please submit your paper proposal to the convenor.