Tag Archives: Spain

Doctoral Studentship for Spanish Architecture at the University of Warwick

zamora_15825The university of Warwick is offering a Doctoral Studentship to a UK/EU candidate, focusing on ‘Petrifying Wealth: Religious buildings in Zamora, 11th-13th Centuries: building processes, forms and functions’

Outline of the project 

The construction of churches or church buildings is obviously as old as the dominance of Christianity in Western societies. The petrification of ecclesiastical wealth, however, implied a more recognisable and enduring presence for this institution throughout the medieval landscape, both urban and rural. The building of churches, and to a lesser extent monasteries, was also promoted by the laity. These were initiatives and investments that were partly religious in origin, in so far as they were ways to ensure the eternal salvation of the founders or of the community involved. The proliferation of masonry-built churches may also raise the question of other objectives of the secular world. Sometimes the laity invested in churches to provide a new, or at least a stronger, more formalised and more recognizable community identity.

Aims and Objectives
The aims and objectives therefore constitute four research strands:

• Contribution to the analysis of the material evidence both on a macro scale and regionally. Census and systematization through a database of churches in the regions selected through a Geographic Information System (GIS).

• Census and chronology of the foundations of family churches, paying particular attention to those endowed by women.

• Estimation of construction costs. Evaluation of aspects related to the production and transport of the materials used, the distance from the quarries of origin, the use of new stone and the reuse of old materials.

• Testing of the hypotheses concerning the functionality and use of the elements of the churches.

Methodology
Fieldwork in Zamora will identify the buildings that will form the focus of the study and these will then be examined archaeologically to determine the materials and the means of construction. Particular attention will focus on the precise recording of masons’ marks and on the compilation of a database of these marks and their locations for each building. These databases will be integrated into the larger database of the whole Petrifying Wealth project.

Outcome
The research will make a substantial contribution to the overall project and will form a discrete section of the database of material relating both to Spain and to the wider context of the project. It will inform further debate on the construction of stone buildings in medieval Europe and the means and methods of construction.

Studentship
The PhD studentship will be based at the CSIC in Madrid, and at the University of Warwick and will be supervised by Dr Therese Martin (CSIC) and Dr Jenny Alexander.

The student will be based in Madrid, have the status of a pre-doctoral fellow at the CSIC and will be expected to participate in CSIC activities. Although English is widely used at the CSIC, working knowledge of Spanish will be needed. Supervisions, by Skype and in person, will be at Warwick.

Applications are welcome from Students from the UK and the EU.

The studentship will cover home/EU fees (full time) and a stipend for UK students or EU students of 22,350 euros, rising to 27,000 euros per annum for three years.

Candidates ideally should have a First Class Honours degree in History of Art or a related discipline and a distinction-level Masters degree in History of Art or a related discipline.

Applications should include a statement of not more than 1,000 words indicating what skills and experience they will bring to the project, a current CV, a transcript of qualifications to date (and anticipated results if you are still studying for your MA), two letters of recommendation plus a writing sample (either a full essay or MA dissertation).

The deadline for applications is March 31st 2018 with interviews to be held in April 2018.

Applications should be made via the University of Warwick online application form.

Please make clear in your online application that you are applying for the Petrifying Wealth studentship.

If you wish to discuss the project in more details please email jennifer.alexander@warwick.ac.uk

Training and Support
Training needs will be assessed immediately after appointment as the level and type of training required will depend on the focus of the research proposal and the skills that the student brings to the discipline.

The student will also be able to participate in workshops offered by Warwick’s Centre for Advanced Doctoral Research Excellence (CADRE) and courses in information technology provided by Warwick’s IT services.

At the beginning of year 2 and 3 a review of training needs will be undertaken by the supervisors, and the regular supervision meetings will monitor this and identify any additional requirements.

Dissemination Plans
The research findings will be disseminated via a 80,000 word doctoral thesis, conference papers, and future publications such as articles, to be submitted beyond the completion date of the project. The results will be incorporated in the Petrifying Wealth database as part of a continuing research resource.

Advertisements

Opens Today: Zurbarán’s Jacob and His Twelve Sons: Paintings from Auckland Castle at The Frick Collection, New York

From January 31, 2018 to April 22, 2018

zurbaran_asher-343x700In collaboration with the Meadows Museum, Dallas, Texas, and The Auckland Project, County Durham, England, The Frick Collection is organising an exhibition of Jacob and His Twelve Sons, an ambitious series of thirteen paintings that depict life-size figures from the Old Testament. On loan from Auckland Castle, the works by the Spanish Golden Age master Francisco de Zurbarán (1598–1664) have never before traveled to the United States. Now on view in Dallas through January 7, 2018, Jacob and His Twelve Sons will be shown at The Frick Collection from January 31 through April 22, 2018. In preparation for this unprecedented American tour, these important seventeenth-century Spanish paintings, dating from the 1640s, have undergone a year-long in-depth technical analysis in the conservation department at the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, the most extensive study of the series to date. For its New York showing in 2018, the exhibition will be coordinated by The Frick Collection’s Senior Curator, Susan Grace Galassi.

Click here for more information.

Casa Vicens, a home designed by Gaudí, now open to the public in Barcelona

cv_blog_post-orientalisme-cv1

© Casa Vicens, Barcelona 2016. Photo: Pol Viladoms

The first home designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí has recently opened to the public. Built between 1883 and 1885 as a summer house for the Vicens family, it is a masterpiece of riotous colour in an eclectic neo-moorish style. After over a century of transformations at the hands of various different owners, the World Heritage Site has been returned to its original disposition, while an addition constructed in 1925 has been transformed into a museum. Located in the Gràcia district and surrounded by a verdant garden, the house is open everyday, from 10 am to 8 pm.

Carrer de les Carolines, 20, 08012 Barcelona, Spain
Open daily from 10 am to 8 pm except 25 December, 1 and 6 January

 

News: Meadows Museum acquires last painting by Spanish master Mariano Fortuny y Marsal

 

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish, 1838–1874), Beach at Portici, 1874. Oil on canvas, 27 x 51 ¼ in. (68.6 x 130.2 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas.

Beach at Portici by Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838- 1874)
Oil on canvas, 27 x 51 ¼ in. (68.6 x 130.2 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas.

The Southern Methodist University’s Website announced today that The Meadows Museum has acquired Beach at Portici, the last painting of famed Spanish artist Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838-1874).

This large-scale, unfinished work depicts the carefree atmosphere of a bbeautiful summer day at the beach, demonstrating Fortuny’s hallmark ability to capture light in paint.

Fortuny was an especially popular artist with 19th-century American collectors and audiences, as revealed by the American provenance of this work. Indeed, it was featured prominently in the American Pavilion’s “Loan Collection of Foreign Masterpieces Owned in the United States” at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, one of the most important international exhibitions of the 19th century.

Beach at Portici will be on view at the Meadows Museum beginning January 19, 2018. From June 24 through September 23, it will be the subject of a focused exhibition, At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase. 

 

Extended: Murillo: The Self-Portraits now on until February 11, 2018

 

6082

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Diego Ortiz de Zúñiga, ca. 1655, oil on canvas, private collection, United Kingdom; image courtesy of Sotheby’s

Until February 11, the Frick Collection in New York is celebrating Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, one of the outstanding painters of the Spanish Golden Age, who will turn 400 years old on 31 December. Well known for his religious paintings and his extraordinary depictions of street urchins, he was also an ingenious painter of portraits. This genre remains, however, the least studied aspect of his work. Inspired by the self-portraits in their holdings, New York’s Frick Collection and London’s National Gallery have co-organized a show which will move to London from February 28 through May 21, 2018.

As widely reported by the media, including the Guardian, an exceptional self-portrait by Murillo just discovered at Penrhyn Castle in Wales has been added to the show on account of its exceptionality.
Click here for more information on the show.

Closing Soon: Zuloaga en el París de la Belle Époque, 1889-1914

1920px-countess_mathieu_de_noailles2c_by_ignacio_zuloaga

Ignacio Zuloaga
Portrait of the Countess Mathieu de Noailles
Oil on canvas
152 x 195.5 cm
1913
Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao

The art of Ignacio Zuloaga (Eibar 1870–1945 Madrid) is often associated with Romantic ideas of Spain’s Black Legend. This exhibition aims to show the painter in a different light, focusing on his connections with the innovations of Belle Époque Paris. The exhibition illuminates the Symbolist milieu in which the Spanish painter moved during his several stays in France. Curated by Leyre Bozal Chamorro and Pablo Jiménez Burillo, it features more than 90 works by such artists as Paul Gauguin, Pablo Picasso, Santiago Rusiñol, Émile Bernard and Auguste Rodin.

 

 

Zuloaga en el París de la Belle Époque, 1889-1914, Fundación MAPFRE Recoletos, Madrid, until 7 January 2018

Extended: Murillo: The Self-Portraits now on until February 11, 2018

 

6082

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Diego Ortiz de Zúñiga, ca. 1655, oil on canvas, private collection, United Kingdom; image courtesy of Sotheby’s

Until February 11, the Frick Collection in New York is celebrating Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, one of the outstanding painters of the Spanish Golden Age, who will turn 400 years old on 31 December. Well known for his religious paintings and his extraordinary depictions of street urchins, he was also an ingenious painter of portraits. This genre remains, however, the least studied aspect of his work. Inspired by the self-portraits in their holdings, New York’s Frick Collection and London’s National Gallery have co-organized a show which will move to London from February 28 through May 21, 2018.

As widely reported by the media, including the Guardian, an exceptional self-portrait by Murillo just discovered at Penrhyn Castle in Wales has been added to the show on account of its exceptionality.
Click here for more information on the show.