Tag Archives: Spain

Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship, Society of Architectural Historians, deadline 30 September, 2018

 

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Cathedral of Santa María la Menor, Santo Domingo

This award provides support for travel related to research on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture.

The awards consist of a $2,000 stipend for a junior scholar and a $6,000 award for a senior scholar. The awardees will be notified in December and will be recognized at the SAH 72nd Annual International Conference in Providence, Rhode Island (April 24–28, 2019). The awards will be announced in the May 2019 issue of the SAH Newsletter.

This fellowship is intended to support the research of junior scholars (usually scholars engaged in doctoral dissertation research) annually, and senior scholars (scholars who have completed their PhD or equivalent terminal degree) every other year in even-numbered years (2020, 2022, 2024, etc.). The research to be supported must focus on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture, including colonial architecture produced by the Spaniards in the Philippines and what is today the United States. The applicant must be a current member of SAH.

Following completion of travel and research supported by the fellowship, each de Montêquin Fellowship awardee must submit a written report summarizing their research and explaining what travel was undertaken and how funds were spent. The report will be submitted to the SAH office no later than three months following the completion of work related to the fellowship. Awardees are required to upload images to SAHARA (a minimum of 50  for junior scholars and a minimum of 150 for senior scholars).

You will need two recommendations to apply for this fellowship, a description of the research project on Iberian or Ibero-American architecture to be funded (500 words maximum), a current curriculum vitae (5 pages max), and a statement of purpose.

Applications for the 2019 Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship will open at 3 pm CDT on August 1, 2018, and close on September 30, 2018.

Click here for more information and to complete the application form.

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Featured Exhibition: Gala Salvador Dalí: A Room of One’s Own in Púbol, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, until 14 October

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Salvador Dalí. Gala Placidia. Galatea of the Spheres, 1952. Fundació Gala- Salvador Dalí, Figueres © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018

Gala (7th September 1894 – 10th June 1982), born into a family of intellectuals from Kazan (Russia), spent her childhood in Moscow before moving to Switzerland and then Paris. There she befriended such prominent members of the surrealist movement as Max Ernst. In 1929 she travelled to Cadaqués, where she met Dalí. The two fell in love and started to live together, first during an eight-year exile in the United States and then in Portlligat, New York and Paris.

Gala, an enigmatic and intuitive lady famous as Salvador Dalí’s wife, muse and model, is the subject of this exhibition. Abandoning traditional stereotypes on the role of this figure, the show follows her transformation into a fully-fledged artist, exploring her artistic cooperation with Dalí and revealing the possible shared authorship of some works.

Click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: Michel Sittow. Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe, until 16 September at The Kumu Museum, Tallinn

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Born in Tallinn, Michel Sittow, studied in the studio of his father Clawes van der Sittow, a respected painter and wood carver. In 1484, the young artist headed to Bruges, the art centre of the Netherlands at the time, probably to work in the studio of Hans Memling, a German who was the town’s most sought-after master. There he learned the illusionist technique typical of the Netherlandish school of painting.

From 1492 to 1504, Michel Sittow was in the service of Isabella of Castile, and later worked as a portraitist for Philip the Handsome, Margaret of Austria, Ferdinand of Aragon and Christian II of Denmark. Sittow returned to his home-town of Tallinn, first in 1506 in connection with an inheritance dispute, when he joined the local artists’ guild. In 1514, Sittow left for Copenhagen at the invitation of King Christian II, and from there he went on to Spain and the Netherlands. The famous portraitist returned to Tallinn for good in early 1518.
With his diverse heritage (a family with German and Finnish-Swedish roots living in Tallinn) and cosmopolitan career, Sittow did not fit in with the national narrative of art history that prevailed in the first half of the 20th century. However, his cosmopolitan career is all the more relevant in the current European context.

The international exhibition project, which includes multi-faceted collaboration with centres in Europe and the United States, brings Sittow’s extraordinary works from distinguished museums and private collection to his first solo exhibition. This is a unique platform for a broader introduction and further research on the oeuvre of this remarkable artist. Most of Sittow’s small number of works (20 to 25 paintings) are on exhibit, thereby providing an excellent survey of his work as a portraitist and painter of religious works. It also allows us to view his art in a broader context, including in collaboration with Juan de Flandes and other contemporary Netherlandish artists. In addition to the paintings, another section of the exhibition is comprised of a timeline that provides an overview of the 500-year story of Michel Sittow, from his birth and successful career to his fall into oblivion and rediscovery.

The exhibition, which is a collaborative project of the Art Museum of Estonia and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will take place in 2018 in celebration of the centenary of the Republic of Estonia. This year also marks 500 years since Michel Sittow’s final return to his home-town of Tallinn.

Click here for more details.

Tomorrow: Artistic Trade between Spain and its Viceroyalties from 1500 to 1800, King’s College, Cambridge, 22 June 2018

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This is the first conference in the United Kingdom devoted to artistic trade between Spain and its viceroyalties. Referring to Cambridge’s Spanish and colonial art collections and with the indispensable support of the Nigel Glendinning studentship for Spanish studies, this conference brings together scholars specialized in the art from the Spanish Viceroyalties. The speakers will trace the artworks from their production, their movement with the help of agents and their collection and display at their destination. Such approach avoids setting an epicentre and periphery but establishes an equalitarian platform on the movement of art within the Spanish Empire.

8:30- 9:15 – Registration.

Introductory remarks:

9:15- 9:30 – Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

Keynote speaker:

9:30- 10:00 – Luisa Elena Alcalá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Passageways of Art in the Atlantic world: Artists, Patrons and Agents.

  1. Workshops and Artists Producing Art for the Spanish Viceroyalties and Transitory Spaces.

Chaired by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

10:00- 10:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum), Shipwrecked Ivories: The Confluence of East and West.

10:30- 11:00 – Piers Baker Bates (The Open University), Traveling between the Viceroyalties: Artistic Translation in the Sixteenth-century Hispanic World.

11:00- 11:30 – Escardiel González Estevez (Universidad de Sevilla), Alonso Vázquez between Seville, Mexico and Manila (1603-1608): The Paradigm of a “Global Artist”.

11:30- 12:00- Questions.

12:00-13:30- Lunch break.

  1. The Role of Agents Commercializing Artworks between Spain and its Viceroyalties

Chaired by José Ramón Marcaida López (University of Saint Andrews)

13:30-14:00 – Sandra Van Ginhoven (Getty Research Institute, Research Associate), Spanish Transatlantic Agents and the Flemish Guilliam Forchondt in the Overseas Paintings Trade.

14:00- 14:30 – Corinna Gramatke (Technical University of Munich Chair of Conservation-Restoration), “The Portable Europe”: European Artworks for the Jesuit Province of Paraguay (1608-1767).

14:30-15:00 – Eduardo Lamas Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Madrilenian Painters and America: Artistic Production for Overseas Trade Networks and their possible Agents.

15:00- 16:00- Questions followed by a coffee break.

  1. Collecting and Display in Private, Civil and Religious Spaces in the Spanish Viceroyalties.

Chaired by Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)

16:00-16:30 – Kathryn Santner (Leverhulme Trust Fellow, ILAS, London), Conventual Art Collections and Artistic Exchange in the Colonial Viceroyalties.

16:30-17:00 – Isabel Oleas Mogollón (University of Delaware), The Divine and the Self: Uses and Meanings of Mirrors in Quito’s Jesuit Church.

17:00-17:30 – Veronika Winkler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München), Witnessing the Saint’s Life: Patrons and Hagiographical Painting Cycles of Viceregal Peru.

17:30- 18:00- Final questions and closing remarks.

For further information please contact Akemi Herráez Vossbrink at alh64@cam.ac.uk.

To book your place, please click here

Featured Exhibitions: ‘Zuloaga. Character and Emotion’, Centro Cultural Bancaja, Valencia (until 26 August 2018) and ‘Sorolla and Spirituality’ (until 2 September 2018)

ZuloagaZuloaga. Character and Emotion (until 26 August 2018)

This exhibition features some 66 paintings by the Basque artist, several of which are displayed in public for the first time. Ranging in date from 1888, when Zuloaga was 18, to 1945, the works trace the artist’s development from his training in Paris to the mature work inspired by Spanish artists such as Velázquez, Ribera, Zurbarán, Goya and El Greco. The curators, Sofía Barrón y Carlos Alonso, focus on Zuloaga as both a landscapist and a portraitist. They showcase his representations of turn-of-the-century aristocracy, bourgeoisie and intellectuals, as well as his intimate portraits of family members. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue and is organised in collaboration with the Museo Zuloaga in Pedraza (Segovia) and its president, the artist’s granddaughter, María Rosa Suárez Zuloaga.

SorollaSorolla and Spirituality (until 2 September 2018)

This exhibition features the work Yo soy el pan de la vida, exhibited to the public for the first time since its recent restoration, the result of a collaboration with the owners of the work, the Lladró family. Curated by Felipe Garín, the exhibition explores the religious themes which the Valencian artist explored briefly in the earlier part of his career. It comprises six works produced between 1883 y 1899, including ¡Triste herencia!, Monja en oración, Santa ClotildeMesa petitoria, and La Virgen María, all on loan from major public collections.

Workshop: Nuevos caminos del hispanismo, 16–17 October 2018, Casa de Velázquez, Madrid

ehehi-bis-500x191Click here for more information on a three-day residential workshop at the Casa Velázquez in Madrid. Intended for young researchers, the workshop will explore new currents in Hispanic studies. It is organised around a series of lectures by the following scholars:

Carlos MARTÍNEZ SHAW (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid / Real Academia de la Historia).
Alicia ALTED VIGIL (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid)
Louise BÉNAT-TACHOT (Université Paris – Sorbonne)
Fernando BOUZA ÁLVAREZ (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Serge GRUZINSKI (École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris)
Roberto MONDOLA (Università degli Studi l’Orientale di Napoli)
José Luis SÁNCHEZ NORIEGA (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Jesusa VEGA GONZÁLEZ (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

followed by extensive discussion in Spanish and French.

The deadline for enrolment is 12 July 2018 at 5pm. Applicants are required to fill an application form, which will be evaluated on the basis of academic record and language fluency. The 20 selected candidates will be notified after 20 July 2018. The workshop costs 50 euros inclusive of accommodation and lunch. African and Latin American applicants may be selected for a scholarship of 300 euros, intended as a contribution towards travel costs.

 

Conference: Artistic Trade between Spain and its Viceroyalties from 1500 to 1800, King’s College, Cambridge, 22 June 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f423725462f680690561952f12foriginal

This is the first conference in the United Kingdom devoted to artistic trade between Spain and its viceroyalties. Referring to Cambridge’s Spanish and colonial art collections and with the indispensable support of the Nigel Glendinning studentship for Spanish studies, this conference brings together scholars specialized in the art from the Spanish Viceroyalties. The speakers will trace the artworks from their production, their movement with the help of agents and their collection and display at their destination. Such approach avoids setting an epicentre and periphery but establishes an equalitarian platform on the movement of art within the Spanish Empire.

8:30- 9:15 – Registration.

Introductory remarks:

9:15- 9:30 – Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

Keynote speaker:

9:30- 10:00 – Luisa Elena Alcalá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Passageways of Art in the Atlantic world: Artists, Patrons and Agents.

  1. Workshops and Artists Producing Art for the Spanish Viceroyalties and Transitory Spaces.

Chaired by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

10:00- 10:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum), Shipwrecked Ivories: The Confluence of East and West.

10:30- 11:00 – Piers Baker Bates (The Open University), Traveling between the Viceroyalties: Artistic Translation in the Sixteenth-century Hispanic World.

11:00- 11:30 – Escardiel González Estevez (Universidad de Sevilla), Alonso Vázquez between Seville, Mexico and Manila (1603-1608): The Paradigm of a “Global Artist”.

11:30- 12:00- Questions.

12:00-13:30- Lunch break.

  1. The Role of Agents Commercializing Artworks between Spain and its Viceroyalties

Chaired by José Ramón Marcaida López (University of Saint Andrews)

13:30-14:00 – Sandra Van Ginhoven (Getty Research Institute, Research Associate), Spanish Transatlantic Agents and the Flemish Guilliam Forchondt in the Overseas Paintings Trade.

14:00- 14:30 – Corinna Gramatke (Technical University of Munich Chair of Conservation-Restoration), “The Portable Europe”: European Artworks for the Jesuit Province of Paraguay (1608-1767).

14:30-15:00 – Eduardo Lamas Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Madrilenian Painters and America: Artistic Production for Overseas Trade Networks and their possible Agents.

15:00- 16:00- Questions followed by a coffee break.

  1. Collecting and Display in Private, Civil and Religious Spaces in the Spanish Viceroyalties.

Chaired by Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)

16:00-16:30 – Kathryn Santner (Leverhulme Trust Fellow, ILAS, London), Conventual Art Collections and Artistic Exchange in the Colonial Viceroyalties.

16:30-17:00 – Isabel Oleas Mogollón (University of Delaware), The Divine and the Self: Uses and Meanings of Mirrors in Quito’s Jesuit Church.

17:00-17:30 – Veronika Winkler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München), Witnessing the Saint’s Life: Patrons and Hagiographical Painting Cycles of Viceregal Peru.

17:30- 18:00- Final questions and closing remarks.

For further information please contact Akemi Herráez Vossbrink at alh64@cam.ac.uk.

To book your place, please click here