Tag Archives: art

CFP: Arts and Models of Democracy in post-authoritarian Iberian Peninsula, University of Huddersfield, 28–29 November 2019

Mural for the commemoration of the Carnation Revolution made by Caos, Add FuelDraw and MAR at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa in 2014

The process of democratisation in Portugal and Spain originated from a similar socio-political context. Besides having an almost identical geographical context, two long authoritarian and military dictatorships shaped the two counties on the basis of a nationalist and deeply catholic identity. From the point of view of popular culture, both dictatorships promoted a disengaged culture, based on songs, football matches, bullfights and the stereotypes of Iberian folklore. In the early 1970s, the illiteracy rate and cultural practices indexes in both countries were still among the highest in Europe. Despite these similar starting conditions, the Portuguese transition to democracy was very different from that of Spain; whereas Portugal created a rupture with the previous institutional context through a military coup, in Spain the post-Franco democratisation was founded on negotiated reform. These two processes of transition to democracy in Portugal and Spain, although dissimilar from each other, led to new ways of both high and popular cultural expressions. As a result, the decade following the two dictatorships was characterised by significant and euphoric experiments in the fields of literature, visual and plastic arts, cinema and music. Scholars have paid scant attention to the ways in which artists thought and put into practice the very notion of democracy in these years. Democracy is a highly contested category, one that has been imagined in many different ways, and any particular realisation of which carries costs as well as benefits. According to the historian of democracy Pierre Rosanvallon (2008), the rise of a democracy entails both a promise and a problem for a society.

This two-day conference aims to innovatively question how artistic practices and institutions formed ways of imagining democracy and by what means arts and culture participate in the wider social struggle to define freedom and equality for the post-Estado Novo and post-Francoist period: how did artistic practices instantiate ideas of democracy in this context? Inversely, how did such democratic values inform artistic practice? How did Portuguese and Spanish artists and intellectuals negotiate between creative autonomy and social responsibility? And more broadly, what is the role of culture in a democracy? The core purpose of the conference is to bring scholars together from different subject areas and exploring any artistic practice (literature, visual and plastic arts, cinema and music). PhD students, early careers and senior researchers are invited to submit an abstract to engage in an interdisciplinary and comparative debate on how the field of culture framed different ideas of democracy in the Iberian post-authoritarian transitions during the 1970s and early 1980s.

Papers will be 30-minutes in length with 15 minutes of discussion time, to enable the fullest exchange. Please submit proposals (300 words) and a short bio to I.ContrerasZubillaga(at)hud.ac.uk and g.quaggio(at)sheffield.ac.uk by the deadline Friday 31 May 2019. The programme will be announced in early July.

Click here for more information.

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New Web Resource: Latin American and Caribbean Contemporary Art Web Archive

Carlos Cruz-Diez, Un être flottant, 2016
© Courtesy Galerie Mitterrand / Benoit Fougeirol

The Latin American and Caribbean Contemporary Art Web Archive is a collection developed by the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation‘s Art & Architecture Librarians, and is an extension of an existing effort focused on collecting publications in all formats that document contemporary art and artists of Latin America and the Caribbean. The agreement defines contemporary art as it refers to ‘developments in the visual arts from 1975 to the present,’ with material sought ‘for the entire career of artists who have been active at any time since 1975.’

This archive aims to preserve for researchers the personal and official websites belonging to notable contemporary Latin American and Caribbean artists in order to assure the continuing availability of the important content they contain.

Click here to access and browse the collection on Archive-It here

ARTES Event: Visit to Kingston Lacy, Dorset, May 9, 2019

The Spanish Room at Kingston Lacy

ARTES has organised a tour of Kingston Lacy, the country estate of the Bankes family. The house has an important art collection, including works by Velázquez, Tintoretto, Rubens, Van Dyck and Brueghel. It is also famous for its ‘Golden’ or ‘Spanish Room’, featuring an early 17th-century Venetian ceiling and hangings of gilded leather. In 1857 Gustav Waagen said of the paintings once decorating this room: “I know no other collection in England containing so many valuable pictures of the Spanish school” .

The visit will consist of: 
-Tour of art collection and rooms
-Picnic lunch
-Visit to the grounds and kitchen gardens, including the Japanese Gardens.

Members are advised to contact ARTES for practical information regarding timings, trains and prices. It will be possible to take part in the visit as a day-trip from London. 

Please RSVP by 24 April to p.baker_bates@open.ac.uk and artesiberia@gmail.com

Maius Workshop Meeting: Alex Letvin, ‘Baroque Rivals? Zurbarán and Murillo Between Seville and Madrid’

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place on 18 February, 5–6pm, in the Research Forum, Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, Kings Cross, London WC1X 9EW (*Please note the change of address).

Alex Letvin, Andrew W. Mellon and Maude de Schauensee Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow in the Department of European Painting and Sculpture at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will discuss work-in-progress research on Spanish Golden Age painters Zurbarán and Murillo. 

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at Alex’s presentation, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future events.

200 Years of the Museo del Prado, 1819–2019

On 19 November 1819 Ferdinand VII of Spain inaugurated the Museo Real de Pinturas. Over the following two centuries, the new institution would turn into the Museo Nacional del Prado, one of the world’s most visited museums with an unparalleled collection of around 8,200 drawings, 7,600 paintings, 4,800 prints, and 1,000 sculptures.

The Museum will celebrate its anniversary with several exhibitions and events over the course of the year. Highlights of the programme are:

Current exhibitions

Museo del Prado 1819–2019. A place of memory, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, until 10 March 2019

lmd8988This exhibition opens the anniversary celebrations by offering a survey of the museum’s history that focuses on the dialogue between the Museum and society; heritage policies in Spain; the trends that have guided the growth of the museum’s collection and its transformation into a place that has allowed Spanish and foreign writers, intellectuals and artists to reflect on the country’s past and its collective identity.

Velázquez and the Golden AgeCaixaForum, Barcelona, until 3 March 2019

1aec4fcf-3625-450e-bf34-d074d781c69bArt at the court of Philip IV was an international language devoid of local boundaries. The work of Velázquez after 1623 is best understood in this international context. He was deeply influenced by paintings in the royal collections, especially works by Titian, Tintoretto and Rubens. One of his key experiences was the trip to Rome in 1629 where he encountered classical and Renaissance art and established contacts with his contemporaries in Italy. The exhibition underscores such internationalism through a selection of 61 paintings associated with Velázquez, the Spanish royal collections and the Spanish Golden Age. More than twenty of these works were painted by Italian, Flemish and French artists, including Titian, Rubens, Luca Giordano, Jan Brueghel, Anthonis Mor, Giovanni Lanfranco, Claude Lorrain, Salvator Rosa, Massimo Stanzione and Guido Reni. Spanish artists are represented through works by Ribera, Zurbarán, Murillo, Alonso Cano, Pereda, Maíno, Sánchez Coello, Mazo, Van der Hamen and others.

Forthcoming exhibitions

El maestro de papel. Cartillas españolas para aprender a dibujar de los siglos XVII y XVIII [The paper teacher. Spanish Drawing Manuals of the 17th and 18th Centuries], Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, from 15 October 2019 to 2 February 2020

2f86f58c9a8eaae8237c3c1faff98bc8This exhibition focuses on Spanish drawing manuals of the 17th and 18th centuries, locating them in their international context. These rare and innovative manuals responded to changing trends in the theory and practice of art. While such learning aids were produced across Europe, this exhibition will highlight the unique features of Spanish examples through works by José de Ribera, Pedro de Villafranca y Malagón, José García Hidalgo, Friar Matías de Irala and José López Enguídanos.

Solo la voluntad me sobra. Drawings by Goya, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, from 19 November 2019 to 16 February 2020

d70b6af5-5b03-b189-cd11-ca0040d4325fThis exhibition is the result of the research undertaken for the publication of a new catalogue raisonné of Goya’s drawings, a subject to which the Museo del Prado has always devoted particular attention and which is one of the keystones of its collection. The exhibition will bring together more than 100 drawings by Goya from the Prado’s own collections and from public and private ones around the world. It will be presented as an extensive chronological survey of the master’s oeuvre, ranging from the Italian Sketchbook to the Bordeaux Albums. It will also offer an up-to-date vision of the ideas that recurrently appear in Goya’s work, revealing the ongoing and long-lasting relevance of his thinking.

Sofonisba Anguissola y Lavinia Fontana. Dos modelos de mujeres artistasMuseo Nacional del Prado, Madrid 22 October 2019 to 2 February 2020

39265f92-e9b3-6f56-3ee3-54fcbb8bab6cThe exhibition will reveal the artistic personality of two of the most outstanding women artists in western art. Through a total of 60 works and for the first time, the Museo del Prado will jointly present the most important paintings by Sofonisba Anguissola (c. 1535–1625) and Lavinia Fontana (1552–1614). The two artists achieved recognition and fame among their contemporaries for and despite their status as female painters. Both were able to break away from the prevailing stereotypes assigned to women in relation to artistic practice and the deep-rooted scepticism regarding women’s creative and artistic abilities. In particular, Sofonisba Anguissola had close connections with the Spanish court as tutor to Queen Elizabeth of Valois and later official court painter to King Philip II.

Their Majesties’ Retiring Room, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid 9 April 2019 to 24 November 2019

bfb4ca28-f763-c08f-97af-55b7416e5c2eThis exhibition project will recreate the original aspect of Room 39, known as Their Majesties’ Retiring Room. First opened in 1828, it was intended as a portrait gallery of the Bourbon Dynasty. The images on display were accompanied by still lifes, floral compositions and landscapes and by other paintings that depict events from the reigns of Charles III and Ferdinand VII. This installation will recreate the hanging of the paintings at different heights and will include some of the furnishings made for this space, including Ferdinand VII’s toilet.

Velázquez, Rembrandt, Vermeer. Miradas afines en España y Holanda [Velázquez, Rembrandt, Vermeer. Shared perspectives in Spain and the Low Countries], Museo Nacional del Prado, 25 June 2019 to 29 September 2019

0c80874a-3a0c-89ed-ff82-003ecc34c090This exhibition on late 16th- and early 17th-century Dutch and Spanish painting is the result of an extensive and important research project on the part of the Museum arising from a collaborative agreement with the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, which will be lending a significant group of works. The exhibition will offer a reflection on the pictorial traditions represented by Spain and the Low Countries. While Dutch art-historical literature has considered these traditions as essentially different, this exhibition will aim to juxtapose the historical myths and artistic realities of the two countries and to reflect on the numerous traits that they share. In order to appreciate these parallels the exhibition will include major works by artists such as Velázquez, Rembrandt, Ribera, Frans Hals and Vermeer.

Permanent Displays and Other Projects

Prado 200Museo Nacional del Prado and online, from 1 November 2019

6a2874c8-2b1b-2995-ea7b-6a627c68ad6aPrado 200 is a new feature within the museum’s permanent display. This installation is presented as nine chronological sections which will present the museum’s history with an emphasis on its architecture, public image and its principal exhibitions and activities. Curated by Victor Cageao, it will include works of art and documentary material from the permanent collection and from the holdings of the Museum’s archive and library (paintings, sculptures, prints, photographs, documents, architectural models, plans, etc.), displayed in Rooms 100, 101 and 102 of the Villanueva Building. It will be accompanied by a specially designed online timeline providing access to graphic and technical documentation on the Museum’s history.

Memoria audiovisual del Museo del Prado and Voces del Prado. Una historia oral 

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The video Memoria audiovisual del Museo del Prado present a selection of films and other television programmes filmed in the Museo del Prado, from 1907 to today. Voces del Prado. Una historia oral collects the oral history of the museum through interviews with employees, from the 1940s to today.

 

 

On Tour through Spain, various locations, until 8 December 2019screenshot 2019-01-22 at 12.19.26

As part of the project De gira por España, important works from the Prado collection will be on loan to a series of provincial museums, one for each of Spain’s autonomous regions or autonomous cities. Click here to find an interactive map of the loans.

 

 

And ARTES?

ARTES plans to join the party and organise events to celebrate the Prado’s birthday, for example in this year’s Glendinning lecture, by Javier Barón, Two Masters of the Prado: Velázquez, El Greco and Modern Painting. We have also changed our cover image to El Museo Del Prado, a painting by José Franco Cordero dated to c. 1890. The work, in the collection of the Madrid’s history museum, shows the Museum’s north façade before the construction of a new entrance designed by Francisco Jareño and completed around 1892. The church of San Jerónimo el Real is visible in the background. Click here for more information on this work.

Prado.jpg

José Franco Cordero, El Museo Del Prado, c. 1890, Museo de Historia, Madrid. Creative Commons – Reconocimiento-NoComercial 2.5 España (CC BY-NC 2.5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closing Soon! ‘Ribera: Art of Violence’, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, until 27 January 2019

ribera-martiri-de-sant-bartomeu-large-bannerThis is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition focuses on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

613cmo6qaylA scholarly catalogue accompanies the exhibition, showcasing the new research which has informed the display.

Ribera: Art of Violence is co-curated by ARTES committee member Dr Edward Payne, author of a PhD thesis on the theme of violence in Ribera’s art (2012) and contributor to the catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings (2016), and Dr Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection), former Arturo and Holly Melosi Chief Curator at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and curator of the National Gallery’s exhibitions The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700 (2009) and Goya: The Portraits (2015).

 

Featured Exhibition: After ’68. Art and artistic practices in the Basque Country 1968–2018, Museo de Bellas Artes, Bilbao, until 28 April 2019

exposicion-2-800-268Survey exhibition of some 150 works, including painting, sculpture, photography, video art and works on paper, by nearly 100 artists, covering the five decades from 1968, when a new generation of Basque artists born in the 1940s was joining the art scene, to 2018 when art made by women has become increasingly prominent. It also assesses the importance that the individual and collective careers that emerged in the region have had on both Spanish and international art. The show’s point of departure will be the collection of the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum, which will be joined by important loans from private collections and fellow public institutions—such as the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, ARTIUM and the Kunstmuseum of Basel—that have placed particular emphasis on acquiring contemporary Basque art. The exhibition, which is curated in-house by Miriam Alzuri, Begoña González and Miguel Zugaza, will be accompanied by a catalogue. Click here for more information.

After ’68. Art and Practices in the Basque Country 1968–2018 is completed in gallery 33 by an exhibition space curated by the musician, producer, journalist and sound artist Xabier Erkizia. This gallery presents original materials—record covers, posters, sound recordings, etc.—which provide a historical view of the musical and sound practices in the Basque Country over these past five decades. This section of the exhibition can be explored through a dedicated microsite at this link.