Tag Archives: art

Lecture: Edward Payne (The Auckland Project), ‘In the Shadow of Louis-Philippe: Building a Spanish Gallery in County Durham,’ Visual Cultures Forum, Queen Mary University of London, 22 March 2018


The Backhouse Bank in Bishop Auckland, soon to re-open as the Spanish Gallery

On 22 March 2018 at 6 pm ARTES Committee Member Edward Payne will lecture on ‘In the Shadow of Louis-Philippe: Building a Spanish Gallery in County Durham,’ at the Visual Cultures Forum of Queen Mary University of London. The lecture will offer a glimpse behind the scenes of an exciting project in the North East of England. It will provide an introduction to the origins of an unusual endeavour—building a Spanish art gallery a stone’s throw away from a bishop’s palace—as well as a sneak preview of the gallery’s contents, including recent acquisitions and plans for potential loans and narratives.

To reserve a place, please click here.


Opens today: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern, London


Pablo Picasso The Dream (Le Rêve) 1932, Private Collection © Succession Picasso/DACS, London 2017

Co-organised by Tate Modern and the Musée Picasso, Paris, the exhibition Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern chronicles an intensely creative year in the life of this artist. Focusing on representing his lover Marie-Thérèse Walter, he produced some of his most innovative compositions.
Surprisingly, this will be the Tate’s first ever solo exhibition dedicated to Picasso. Featuring paintings, drawings, and archive documents, the exhibition will reveal the man behind the myth, allowing visitors to discover the full complexity of this famous artist and of his exceptional life.

Conference: Inmaculada Hispánica. Imaginarios visuales en una monarquía confesional, EEHAR, Rome, 6 June 2018


The Catholic Church did not define the mystery of the Immaculate Conception of Mary as a dogma until 1854. Yet as early as 1616 Felipe III created the Real Junta de la Inmaculada and proclaimed the Spanish Crown as the greatest supporter of the doctrine. Ever since, the Spanish Monarchy was at the centre of an intense propaganda campaign intended to promote belief in the immaculate conception. Art played a key role in this project.

This seminar will explore the different aspects of this marketing operation in the Iberian kingdoms, in the Italian Viceroyalties and in Rome itself. From Madrid, Palermo and Seville, the speakers will unveil the images of one of the most striking campaigns of visual propaganda in history.

Coordinator: Rafael Valladares (EEHAR-CSIC)

Director: Pablo González Tornel (Universitat Jaume I)


Pablo González Tornel (Universitat Jaume I): Inmaculada Hispánica. Propaganda y persuasión en la España del Seiscientos.
Piers Baker-Bates (Open University, London): Inmaculada Hispánica in Rome: visual propaganda in the service of doctrine.
Maurizio Vitella (Università degli Studi di Palermo): Iconografia della Purissima Regina nel Viceregno di Sicilia.
Benito Navarrete Prieto (Universidad de Alcalá): La Inmaculada como instrumento político desde Murillo al nacionalcatolicismo.

Location: Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma. Via di Sant’Eufemia 13. 00187 Roma.
Date and time: miércoles 6 de junio de 2018, 16:00 horas.

Click here for the programme in Spanish and Italian.

Forthcoming Exhibition: ‘Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida’ at the Meadows Museum, Dallas


Eduardo Chillida, Peine del Vento, 1977
San Sebastián, Guipuzkoa, Spain

This spring, the Meadows Museum will present Dallas’s first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Eduardo Chillida (1924–2002). Chillida, one of Spain’s most celebrated modern sculptors, is famous for his monumental iron and stone sculptures that shape both urban and rural landscapes. This exhibition includes 66 of the artist’s works, from his sculptures, to his drawings, collages, gravitations, graphic works, and a selection of his books. Co-curated by William Jeffett, chief curator of exhibitions for The Dalí Museum, and Ignacio Chillida, the artist’s son, the works in Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida come exclusively from the Museo Chillida-Leku in Hernani (San Sebastián, Spain); the exhibition travels to Dallas from the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. A complimentary exhibition, Chillida in Dallas: De Musica at the Meyerson, is curated by Meadows/Mellon/Prado Curatorial Fellow Amanda W. Dotseth and will focus on the landmark commission by Chillida at Dallas’s Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. The two exhibitions will open on February 4, 2018, and run through June 3.

The exhibition will be accompanied by an educational programme which will include:

LUIS CHILLIDA, director, Fundación Eduardo Chillida-Pilar Belzunce
Memory, Mind, Matter: The Public Art of Eduardo Chillida in


AMANDA W. DOTSETH, Meadows/Mellon/Prado curatorial fellow, Meadows
Medieval and Modern: Alabaster from Gil de Siloé to
Eduardo Chillida

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 6:00-7:00 P.M.
BEATRIZ CORDERO, professor, Saint Louis University, Madrid
Lightness and Rightness: Eduardo Chillida and James Johnson
Sweeney in the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 12:15 P.M.
JED MORSE, chief curator, Nasher Sculpture Center
Chillida in Dallas Part I: Chillida Downtown

SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 10:00 A.M.-1:00 P.M.

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 12:15 P.M.
SCOTT WINTERROWD, director of education, Meadows Museum
Chillida in Dallas Part II: Chillida in Dallas


Doctoral Studentship for Spanish Architecture at the University of Warwick

zamora_15825The university of Warwick is offering a Doctoral Studentship to a UK/EU candidate, focusing on ‘Petrifying Wealth: Religious buildings in Zamora, 11th-13th Centuries: building processes, forms and functions’

Outline of the project 

The construction of churches or church buildings is obviously as old as the dominance of Christianity in Western societies. The petrification of ecclesiastical wealth, however, implied a more recognisable and enduring presence for this institution throughout the medieval landscape, both urban and rural. The building of churches, and to a lesser extent monasteries, was also promoted by the laity. These were initiatives and investments that were partly religious in origin, in so far as they were ways to ensure the eternal salvation of the founders or of the community involved. The proliferation of masonry-built churches may also raise the question of other objectives of the secular world. Sometimes the laity invested in churches to provide a new, or at least a stronger, more formalised and more recognizable community identity.

Aims and Objectives
The aims and objectives therefore constitute four research strands:

• Contribution to the analysis of the material evidence both on a macro scale and regionally. Census and systematization through a database of churches in the regions selected through a Geographic Information System (GIS).

• Census and chronology of the foundations of family churches, paying particular attention to those endowed by women.

• Estimation of construction costs. Evaluation of aspects related to the production and transport of the materials used, the distance from the quarries of origin, the use of new stone and the reuse of old materials.

• Testing of the hypotheses concerning the functionality and use of the elements of the churches.

Fieldwork in Zamora will identify the buildings that will form the focus of the study and these will then be examined archaeologically to determine the materials and the means of construction. Particular attention will focus on the precise recording of masons’ marks and on the compilation of a database of these marks and their locations for each building. These databases will be integrated into the larger database of the whole Petrifying Wealth project.

The research will make a substantial contribution to the overall project and will form a discrete section of the database of material relating both to Spain and to the wider context of the project. It will inform further debate on the construction of stone buildings in medieval Europe and the means and methods of construction.

The PhD studentship will be based at the CSIC in Madrid, and at the University of Warwick and will be supervised by Dr Therese Martin (CSIC) and Dr Jenny Alexander.

The student will be based in Madrid, have the status of a pre-doctoral fellow at the CSIC and will be expected to participate in CSIC activities. Although English is widely used at the CSIC, working knowledge of Spanish will be needed. Supervisions, by Skype and in person, will be at Warwick.

Applications are welcome from Students from the UK and the EU.

The studentship will cover home/EU fees (full time) and a stipend for UK students or EU students of 22,350 euros, rising to 27,000 euros per annum for three years.

Candidates ideally should have a First Class Honours degree in History of Art or a related discipline and a distinction-level Masters degree in History of Art or a related discipline.

Applications should include a statement of not more than 1,000 words indicating what skills and experience they will bring to the project, a current CV, a transcript of qualifications to date (and anticipated results if you are still studying for your MA), two letters of recommendation plus a writing sample (either a full essay or MA dissertation).

The deadline for applications is March 31st 2018 with interviews to be held in April 2018.

Applications should be made via the University of Warwick online application form.

Please make clear in your online application that you are applying for the Petrifying Wealth studentship.

If you wish to discuss the project in more details please email jennifer.alexander@warwick.ac.uk

Training and Support
Training needs will be assessed immediately after appointment as the level and type of training required will depend on the focus of the research proposal and the skills that the student brings to the discipline.

The student will also be able to participate in workshops offered by Warwick’s Centre for Advanced Doctoral Research Excellence (CADRE) and courses in information technology provided by Warwick’s IT services.

At the beginning of year 2 and 3 a review of training needs will be undertaken by the supervisors, and the regular supervision meetings will monitor this and identify any additional requirements.

Dissemination Plans
The research findings will be disseminated via a 80,000 word doctoral thesis, conference papers, and future publications such as articles, to be submitted beyond the completion date of the project. The results will be incorporated in the Petrifying Wealth database as part of a continuing research resource.