Tag Archives: 16th Century

Reminder: ARTES AGM and Group Visit, V&A, London, Thursday 13 June 2019

ARTES’s AGM will take place at the V&A at 12:30 on 13 June 2019. It will be followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th Century.

Meet at the V&A, Exhibition Road Reception, at 11:50. Sandwich lunch (GBP 5) and AGM from 12–2, followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

***Attendees are asked to arrive punctually, as late arrivals may be difficult to  accommodate*** 

Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com to book a place.

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ARTES AGM and Group Visit, V&A, London, Thursday 13 June 2019

ARTES’s AGM will take place at the V&A at 12:30 on 13 June 2019. It will be followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th Century.

Meet at the V&A, Exhibition Road Reception, at 11:50. Sandwich lunch (GBP 5) and AGM from 12–2, followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

***Attendees are asked to arrive punctually, as late arrivals may be difficult to  accommodate*** 

Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com to book a place.

Featured Exhibition: Revealing, Reversible and Resplendent: 15th-17th-Century Italian and Spanish Textiles, Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, until 16 June 2019

Orphrey fragment (detail), Late 16th-early 17th century. Italian/Spanish. Silk and linen, 23 7/8 x 8 3/8 inches. 2008.45.

This exhibition showcases silk and linen fragments spanning the 15th to 17th centuries, a period of expanded exploration and trade, when Italy and Spain emerged as major centres of textile production. During this era, textiles with three-dimensional effects became popular within the Christian church and the secular world. Cloth and threads were fashioned into elaborate embroidery, gilded three-dimensional images, brilliantly-hued reversible fabrics, and even textiles purposely cut in a pattern that revealed glimpses of one’s undergarments below—a style fashionable during the 17th century. To create relief images, professionally trained embroiderers attached applied work, or appliqués, onto garments, such as orphreys – decorative panels for church vestments.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

Closing Soon! ‘Ribera: Art of Violence’, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, until 27 January 2019

ribera-martiri-de-sant-bartomeu-large-bannerThis is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition focuses on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

613cmo6qaylA scholarly catalogue accompanies the exhibition, showcasing the new research which has informed the display.

Ribera: Art of Violence is co-curated by ARTES committee member Dr Edward Payne, author of a PhD thesis on the theme of violence in Ribera’s art (2012) and contributor to the catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings (2016), and Dr Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection), former Arturo and Holly Melosi Chief Curator at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and curator of the National Gallery’s exhibitions The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700 (2009) and Goya: The Portraits (2015).

 

Call for Articles: The Iberian Peninsula under Debate: Historiography, Cultural Encounters and Identities (5th-16th centuries)

 

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A Sé Velha de Coimbra, por Roque Gameiro (1917)

Roda da Fortuna. Revista Eletrônica sobre Antiguidade e Medievo (Electronic Journal about Antiquity and Middle Ages) seeks submission for a thematic dossier, “The Iberian Peninsula under Debate: Historiography, Cultural Encounters and Identities (5th-16th centuries).”

 

Heiress of the Hispanic-Visigothic tradition, the territorial organization of the Iberian Peninsula was the result of a singular historical reality. The Muslims’ invasion of the region in the 8th century intensified the cultural heterogeneity already existing in the region, adding to political-religious conflicts and an ever-changing border. This state of hostility and also, at various moments, of interaction solidified in the experience of Al-Andalus. This peculiar region offers an important and broad interpretative possibility. With the advance of the Christian frontier after the formation of the Portuguese kingdom and the conquests of Cordova (1236) and Seville (1248), the map of the Peninsula changed definitively.

This thematic dossier intends to gather articles that discuss the Iberian experience during the Middle Ages, up to what has been defined as “maritime expansion” in modern historiography. Encompassing multiple research possibilities and varied approaches in such fields as representations, identities, and religious confessions, the debates on the Iberian worlds constitute an enormous challenge to the historian.

The deadline for submitting articles, reviews, and translations are:
– Submission of proposals: until April 30, 2019
– Acceptance of works: July 2019
– Dossier published: August 2019

Proposals must be sent to the e-mail: revistarodadafortuna@gmail.com 

Click here for more information.

 

1 week to go! ‘Ribera: Art of Violence’ opens 26 September 2018 at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

ribera-martiri-de-sant-bartomeu-large-bannerThis autumn, Dulwich Picture Gallery will present the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

613cmo6qaylA scholarly catalogue will accompany the exhibition, showcasing the new research which has informed the display.

Ribera: Art of Violence is co-curated by ARTES committee member Dr Edward Payne, author of a PhD thesis on the theme of violence in Ribera’s art (2012) and contributor to the catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings (2016), and Dr Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection), former Arturo and Holly Melosi Chief Curator at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and curator of the National Gallery’s exhibitions The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700 (2009) and Goya: The Portraits (2015).

The exhibition will be accompanied by an exciting series of events, from an international study day to Animalisa contemporary dance performance. Here is a selection of the most interesting…

  • Ribera: Curator’s Introduction with Dr Edward Payne, 27 September 2018, 12.30pm–1.30pm
  • Skin Deepa workshop on tattoos and skin art led by Dr Matt Lodder, tattoo historian, and Alex Binnie, tattoo artist. 19 October 2018, 7–9.30pm
  • From the Collection: The Aftermath of Violencea journey through shock, grief, acceptance and healing, led by Jennifer Scott, The Sackler Director of Dulwich Picture Gallery, and based on works by Carlo Dolci, Rubens, Van Dyck and Poussin in the Gallery’s collection. 2 November 2018, 12.30–1.30pm
  •  Ribera: Curator’s Introduction with Dr Xavier Bray, 8 November 2018, 7.30pm–8.30pm
  • Beneath The Skin of Ribera’s Bodiesa lecture by Dr Jack Hartnell, Lecturer in Art History at the University of East Anglia. The lecture will reveal the complex and fascinating ways in which the people of the Middle Ages thought about, explored and experienced their physical selves. 30 November 2018, 12.30pm–1.30pm
  • Ribera Study Day, a day of in-depth discussions around the role of violence in art, which will bring together a range of multi-disciplined creative and scholarly minds to prod, probe and discuss profound questions exploring the many facets of Ribera’s work. 10 December 2018, 2.00pm–5.00pm
  • Art and Violence in Renaissance Florence, a lecture by Dr Scott Nethersole, Senior Lecturer in Italian Renaissance Art at The Courtauld Institute of Art in London. This event will explore the relationship between art and violence in 15th-century Florence, exposing the underbelly of a period more often celebrated for enlightened and progressive ideas. 18 January 2019, 12.30–1.30pm

And last but not least, a curator-led tour for ARTES members, which will take place on 28 September 2018 from 9.00am.

CFP: Sacred Images in the Iberian Americas until 1700: Processes, Strategies and Agents, Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March 2019

1024px-our_lady_of_guadalupeSACRED IMAGES IN THE IBERIAN AMERICAS UNTIL 1700: PROCESSES, STRATEGIES AND AGENTS

This panel proposes an approach to the phenomenon of sacred images through three main elements: processes, strategies and agents. The mark of the sacred and the miraculous was achieved by different procedures: hierophanies, thaumaturgy, paranormal phenomena (sweating, weeping, mobility). Definitely, the agency of the sculpture or the painting of religious images blossomed in the Iberian Americas, in need of tradition and sacralization.
Texts about the inventio, the hierophany and other manifestations of the image relate the processes of creation and the evolution of these images until marked by the sacred. In most cases, they follow patterns, repeated to the point of being able to establish a rhetoric of the sacred image. In many cases, these stories, regardless of their historical veracity, provide us valuable information about the strategies devised by the agents. Empowered by their sacred image, these agents (religious orders, patrons…) are in a position to get economic benefits (charity, exemptions), political ones (preferential treatment), and they can build an identity at various levels (territorial, ethnic, political…). The huge amount of textual and visual sources allows to deal with case studies in order to understand the crucial role of the image, through the sacred, in the Ibero-American space of this time.
We invite submissions of proposals for 20 minutes presentations that explore case-studies or some of the many aforementioned aspects of sacred images in the Iberian Americas (also Iberian Asia can be considered) between 16th and 17th century.
Please submit abstracts (200 words maximum), along with a title and a CV (300 word maximum including full name, current affiliation and email address) to Escardiel González (escardielge@gmail.com) and Daniel Expósito Sánchez (daniel.exposito@upr.edu) by August 10, 2018.

More information in: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696697/Art-History-CfPs-for-RSA-2019-Toronto