Author Archives: costanzabeltrami

Conference: Digital Imaginaries of the South: Stories of Belonging and Uprooting in Hispanic Cinemas

maxresdefaultInternational Film Conference (IV TECMERIN Academic Meeting): Digital Imaginaries of the South: Stories of Belonging and Uprooting in Hispanic Cinemas, October 18-20, 2017, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid / Casa de América (Madrid)

Over the past twenty years, digital technology has become the standard in the film production, circulation, and consumption processes. Within this context, Hispanic cinemas have undergone deep changes, both within the countries with an established cinematic tradition, as well as in those that, due to several reasons, had not developed a robust cinematography throughout the 20th century. The analogue paradigm became deeply contested and a new digital framework, which was widely discussed by institutions, film critics, and academics, emerged. This moment coincides with the widespread generalization of national and transnational neoliberal policies that, far from backing diversity, have increased the gap between those “connected” and those “disconnected” (to draw upon Néstor García Canclini’s term); a gap also experienced by those that, even if connected, still occupy subaltern positions.
The speeding of these processes has resulted in an increase of mobility, at work both in the geographical displacement of film professionals and in the emergence of new narrative models that deal with questions of belonging and uprooting, springing precisely from these experiences of displacement. The cinemas of the Global South, and, most specifically, Hispanic cinemas, have actively taken part in these processes, ultimately playing a relevant role in terms of narrative and aesthetic models, and the production, circulation and consumption of film.
Following the main research axes of the R+D project “Transnational relations in Hispanic digital cinemas: the axes of Spain, Mexico, and Argentina” (CSO2014-52750-P), the International Conference Digital Imaginaries of the South: Stories of Belonging and Uprooting in Hispanic Cinemas conference will discuss these themes:
  • The representation of migrations, displacements, exile, and diaspora.
  • Transnational flows of cultural, economic, and human capital in the production and circulation of cinema.
  • The reconfiguration of the regional, national, and transnational Hispanic interactions within the new century.
  • Public discourses and film policies within the region.
  • Hybridization and identity in the narratives on colonization, decolonization, and revolutionary processes.
  • Activism and digital praxis.
  • Genres, authors, stars.
  • Film cultures and cinephilia: festivals, publications, and digital platforms.
  • Minor cinemas: indigenismo, experimental, and/or militant cinemas.
  • Historiographic, theoretical, and methodological problems of so-called Hispanic, Iberian, and Latin American cinemas.

Featured exhibition: Picasso. Ceramics from the Attenborough Collection

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Pablo Picasso, Heads of Women, Aztec vase, 1957. Image by kind permission of the Estate of Lord and Lady Attenborough and The Leicester Arts and Museums Service. © Succession Picasso/DACS, London 2017.

Picasso. Ceramics from the Attenborough Collection, York Art Gallery, York. Closes 5 November 2017.

Lord and Lady Attenborough began collecting ceramics by Picasso in 1954 and continued collecting for over 50 years, building one of the most significant private collections in the UK. Highlights from their collection have been loaned to York by the New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, Leicester. The Picasso ceramics created in the 1950s will be shown within York Art Gallery’s Centre of Ceramic Art (CoCA), which showcases ceramics by more than 600 artists including the founders of the British Studio Ceramics movement.

Art in Translation Special Issue: Spain and Orientalism

f-13259Art in Translation has announced the publication of a special issue on Spain and Orientalism, vol. 9:1 (2017), co-edited by Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh) and Anna McSweeney (Warburg Institute).

This is the first English-language journal issue dedicated to Spanish Orientalism in art and visual culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. The peer-reviewed articles, drawn from a panel at the Association of Art Historians conference in 2016, examine Spain’s complex relationship with her Islamic past and with Morocco, through art, architecture, photography and material culture. They address a range of topics including patterns of collecting, the reproduction of Islamic art and architecture for private and public spaces, the role of Spain’s Islamic heritage in the construction of a national identity as exemplified in Spanish exhibition pavilions, the intersections between art and colonialism, and the role of Spanish art and visual culture in the wider debates about Orientalism.

Table of Contents:

Editorial: Spain and Orientalism, by Anna McSWEENEY and Claudia HOPKINS

The Arab Room of the Palacio de Cerralbo, by Ariane VARELA BRAGA

Reconstructing the Alhambra: Rafael Contreras and the Architectural Models of the Alhambra in the Nineteenth Century, by Asun GONZALEZ PEREZ

Mudéjar and the Alhambresque: Spanish Pavilions at the Universal Expositions and the Invention of a National Style, by Anna McSWEENEY

Vision, Lamentation and Nineteenth-Century Representations of the End of al-Andalus, by Oscar E. VÁZQUEZ

Allende el Estrecho (Beyond the Straits): The Photographic Gaze on the Orient in Andalusia and Morocco, by David SÁNCHEZ CANO

Visualizing ‘Moorish’ Traces within Spain: Orientalism and Medievalist Nostalgia in Spanish Colonial Photojournalism 1909-33, by Elisabeth BOLORINOS ALLARD

The Politics of Spanish Orientalism: Distance and Proximity in Tapiró and Bertuchi, by Claudia HOPKINS

Select Bibliography: Spain and Orientalism

The issue can be accessed online through Taylor and Francis Online.

News from the MNAC

The Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya has made two major acquisition during the summer.

baudiliusAt an auction held in Barcelona on 31 May 2017 they acquired a panel painting representing the Decapitation of Saint Baudilus, painted by Lluís Dalmau for the old Gothic high altarpiece in the parish church of Sant Boi de Llobregat (Baix Llobregat), one of the few works by the painter to have been conserved.
Lluís Dalmau was one of the principal artists working in Barcelona in the mid 15th century, and was employed at the court of King Alfonso IV. There are only two surviving documented works by this outstanding painter: the famous Virgin of the “Consellers”, made between 1443 and 1445, and the altarpiece from Sant Boi, dated to 1448. The Museu Nacional was able to purchase this exceptional work thanks to a donation by the Palarq Foundation. It will certainly become a well-loved masterpiece of the Museum’s impressive collection of Catalan Gothic painting.

maspons_x1500_caThey also acquired 200 photographs by Catalan photographer Oriol Maspons (Barcelona, 1928-2013), thanks to the Nando and Elsa Peretti Foundation. The new acquisition will enable the organisation of a major retrospective dedicated to this photographer in 2019. Moreover, the generosity of the Nando and Elsa Peretti fundation will enable researchers to study the over 7000 photographs and other photographic material deposited at the Museum by the photographer in 2010.

Featured exhibition: Son of Laocoön. Alonso Berruguete and Pagan Antiquity

35933736581_c23472b4c0_bHijo del Laocoonte. Alonso Berruguete y la Antigüedad pagana, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid, until 5 November 2017

This is the first exhibition to explore the ‘pagan soul’ of sixteenth century sculptor Alonso Berruguete. The exhibition focuses on his fascination with the works of antiquity, which he saw on his sojourn in Italy between about 1508 and 1518, and in particular the influence of the newly discovered group of the struggling Laocoon on Berruguete’s own sacred and secular work in Spain.
The exhibition of sculptures, paintings, drawings and prints is selected from Spanish and international collections and accompanied by a full programme of conferences, guided tours, and concerts as well as a multi-essayed catalogue edited by the exhibition’s curator and deputy director of the Museum, Manuel Arias Martínez.

Call for Contributions: Chromatography special issue, HARTS and Minds Journal

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The drowning Dog, Francisco de Goya  ©Museo Nacional del Prado

The Graduate School of Arts and Humanities at Bristol University seeks submissions for the newt issue of their postgraduate journal HARTS and Minds, which will be dedicated to Chromatography or Colour Studies and will be published March 2018. This Special Issue aims to renegotiate the idea that colour is rooted solely in the visual.
HARTS and Minds welcomes articles, book reviews, exhibition reviews, and creative writing pieces.
For articles please send a 300 word abstract by the 10th of September 2017 to editors@harts-minds.co.uk. Accepted articles of 6,000 words will be due October 31st 2017.
Suggested topics include:

Colour symbolism
The materiality of colour
Colour history
The significance of colour in different cultures
The effect of colour science and optics on the humanities
Synaesthesia, or hearing/tasting/smelling colour
Black and white or ‘the absence of colour’
Language and naming colour
Gendering, queer or so called ‘perverse’ colours
Colour and the emotions and the senses
Architectural color and the environment
Colour theory
Natural vs. synthetic or unnatural colour
Colour in advertising and media
The psychology of colour

Please click here for the full CFP

Liz Renes (Editor in Chief) and Jade Boyd (Special Editor)

Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.