Author Archives: costanzabeltrami

Islamic Art Circle Lecture: Dr Jessica Hallett, ‘ART AND OIL: Calouste Gulbenkian and his Collection of Islamic Art’, 13 May 2020, 7:00–9:00pm, SOAS, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Wolfson Lecture Theatre

Interior of the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Wikimedia Commons

Islamic Art Circle Lecture: Dr Jessica Hallett, ‘ART AND OIL: Calouste Gulbenkian and his Collection of Islamic Art’, SOAS, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Wolfson Lecture Theatre, 7:00–9:00pm

Click here for more information

Online Resource: Online Catalogues from the Fundación Juan March

The Fundación Juan March presents to the public its on-line gateway to the complete content of each of the 205 catalogues accompanying the exhibitions held at its three venues since 1973, in Madrid, Cuenca (the Museo de Arte Abstracto Español) and Palma de Mallorca (the Museu Fundación Juan March). This collection of documents will be continually updated, and its principal aims are the dissemination and promotion of research and knowledge in the fields of art and art history and the advancement of public awareness of the institution’s history of exhibitions. Each catalogue will be published online in the languages in which it originally appeared one year following its corresponding exhibition’s conclusion or once all print copies have been sold.

At its inauguration, All Our Art Catalogues since 1973 offers readers over 34,000 pages of material, including essays by more than 500 authors and images of 18,500 works by nearly 1,900 artists and extending beyond 20th century and contemporary art. An advanced navigation tool allows for interconnected searches across the entire site and within each catalogue, and results may be filtered by date, title, language and relevance. The search engine also generates recommendations for consulting similar material in other catalogues.

Click here to access this resource.

New Online Platform: The Arts Society Connected, launching tomorrow, 11am, with an inaugural lecture on Las Meninas by Jacqueline Cockburn

Diego Velázquez, Las Meninas, 1656, Museo Nacional del Prado

The Arts Society Connected (formerly NADFAS, the National Association of Decorative & Fine Arts Societies) is a new digital platform being launched on 7th April by The Arts Society, the UK’s leading arts education charity. 
Free to both The Arts Society’s 90,000 Members as well as the general public, The Arts Society Connected will host a series of fortnightly lectures by the UK’s leading art historians, as well as film screenings, live author Q&As and a community forum for anyone using the platform. 
The aim of the platform is to help older Members of the population stay connected, educated, entertained and informed over the next three months. The core aims of the charity are to create a better, healthier and more connected society through the power of the arts to nourish and empower. The platform will create a welcoming community for both existing Members as well as the general public.

The Arts Society has moved quickly in response to the COVID-19 crisis to create this digital platform as a large proportion of Members are aged 70 and above and will be forced to isolate over the coming months. The Arts Society consists of 380 individual Membership groups, who organise regular lectures and educational trips to museums and galleries throughout the year. With the inability of Members to meet in person, The Arts Society Connected will ensure that Members are able to stay connected online even while they remain in isolation. 
The Arts Society is working with its directory of Accredited Lecturers to create exclusive video lectures for the new platform. Lectures will be uploaded every other Tuesday at 11am. Members will be encouraged to take part in a community moment, when anyone planning on watching the talk can make a cup of tea at home and join the community forums online for a chat before and after the lecture. The lecturer will also be available to answer questions in the community forums following their lecture.

The platform features an inaugural lectureon Las Meninas by Velázquez by Arts Society Accredited Lecturer, art historian and linguist, Jacqueline Cockburn.

 

Documentary: ‘Titian: Behind Closed Doors’ now on BBC iPlayer

In the winter of 1550 the most famous painter in Europe came face to face with the most powerful man on earth. What emerged from this encounter between Prince Philip of Spain and the Renaissance master Titian is seen as one of the most extraordinary commissions in all of Western art history.

Given almost total creative freedom, Titian was free to explore any subject he pleased. He returned with a set of increasingly dark and explicit images about sexual pursuit, assault and violence. Known as The Poesie, these pictures are admired for their groundbreaking brushwork and innovative composition – yet they remain Titian’s most disturbing and puzzling creations.

Now, coinciding with the National Gallery’s exhibition, which brought the paintings together for the first time in 300 years, we ask why this illusive, dark and often disturbing set of paintings has come to be seen as Titian’s greatest work.

This film includes scenes showing Dr. Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery, closing the exhibition shortly after opening due to COVID-19.

First aired on 4 April 2020, the documentary is available on BBC iPlayer for the next 30 days. Click here to watch.

Online course: Introduction to the Archive of the Crown of Aragon (documents in Latin to ca. 1350), 3rd Mediterranean Studies Summer Online Skills Seminar (12–15 May 2020)

Due to measures taken to reduce the danger of the current COVID pandemic, the University of Colorado Boulder has cancelled on-campus events through May 2020. Nevertheless, an modified online version of the Summer Skills Seminar is planned which will be held via ZOOM. 

Those who attend the 2020 Skills Seminar via ZOOM will have the option of also attending a fuller in-person, on-campus iteration of the skills seminar in May 2021, should this be held (for which we will be reading a different selection of documents).

Overview
The Archive of the Crown of Aragon (ACA) in Barcelona contains one of the largest and richest archival collections relating to medieval Europe, comprising hundreds of thousands of documents, most from the twelfth to fifteenth centuries, and including financial records, royal letters, administrative documents, trial records, treaties, and many other genres and types. The documentation can be used for a whole range of topics including social, economic, political, institutional, gender, diplomatic, cultural and religious history. 

The territories of the Crown of Aragon included much of the Iberian Peninsula, parts of southern France, Sicily and southern Italy, parts of Tunisia and Greece, the Balearics, Sardinia and other Mediterranean islands. It had a large and diverse urban population, was highly integrated into Mediterranean and European trade systems, and had significant populations of Muslims and Jews. It developed one of the earliest and most robust chanceries of medieval Europe; the collections of which have weathered the vicissitudes of history all but intact. Much of the documentation has yet to be used by modern historians. The skills seminar will focus on the Latin-language documentation (from the eleventh to the mid-fourteenth centuries) in the archive’s collections.

This four-day intensive skills seminar will provide participants with an overview of the collections of the ACA, including access to online resources and reproductions, and focus on a hands-on introduction to reading unedited documents from a variety of the archive’s fonds. 

Other topics will include: manuscript abbreviations, dating systems, place and personal names, and research resources and techniques. As much as possible the content will be catered to participants’ interests and needs. Medievalists of all disciplines, graduate students, and qualified undergraduate students, as well as library and archival professionals are encouraged to apply. 

The goal is to provides attendees with a solid preparation for conducting work remotely via the PARES web portal and on-site at the ACA. This will not only aid their research but provide them with a bona fide (in the form of a certificate of completion for those who attend the full seminar), which may be advantageous in securing grants or other funding for research and travel. The ability to do archival research with unedited documents is a skill relatively few doctoral students master, and it enhances the research profile and CV of academic job-seekers.

Participants will find the skills and techniques which the course focuses on useful not only at the Archive of the Crown but at other medieval archives across Spain and Europe.

Applicants should have at least an intermediate level of reading Latin. Those wishing to bone-up on their Latin fluency in advance of the course are encouraged to read the Latin Vulgate and review declensions and conjugations. 

For sample documents, together with transcriptions click here

This Summer Skills Seminar builds on the experience of earlier editions, which participants signaled as “transformative” in terms of their research, and which provided them with an opportunity to network and lay the foundations for future collaborations.

Cost

The cost of the course is: $1000 for Full Professors, Librarians,  Professionals, Independent Scholars; $750 for tenured Associates; $500 for non-tenured Associates and Assistants & Graduate and Undergraduate students; $350 for Adjuncts, Lecturers & Contingent faculty. Members of supporting University of Colorado departments are eligible for a 50% discount. The cost may be tax deductible. Those who pay for the online course will be entitled to attend an in-person iteration planned for May 2021.

Program
The course will be held 13-15 May 2020 from 10am to noon and 1-3pm Mountain TIme via ZOOM

Faculty
The course will be conducted by Prof. Brian A. Catlos (Religious Studies, CU Boulder). A graduate of the University of Toronto’s Centre for Medieval Studies (Phd, 2000) and now a historian of pre-Modern Spain and the Mediterranean, Catlos has been using the collections of the ACA since 1995, primarily for research into the social and economic history of the Crown of Aragon and Muslim-Christian-Jewish relations. 

Important dates:
Application deadline: 1 May 2020
Confirmation of course enrollment: 4 May 2020 
Tuition due: 8 May 2020
Seminar: Tuesday, 12 May – Friday, 15 May, 10am–noon and 1-3pm MST

Apply via this form
For further information or inquiries, contact Brian Catlos (brian.catlos@colorado.edu; subject: “Summer Skills Information”)

This program is organized by the CU Mediterranean Studies Group under the aegis of the Mediterranean Seminar and is made possible thanks to the support of the University of Colorado Boulder.

Summer course: “Romanization and Islamization in the Western Mediterranean”, Casa Árabe, Córdoba, Monday 23– Saturday 28 July 2020

Specialists from different academic institutions will guide a select group of students in a series of seminar-style intensive classes throughout a week-long course.

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES
The image above speaks for itself: in the background, built as the Friday Mosque of Cordoba, an extraordinary example of medieval Arab architecture and a popular tourist destination, which is at the same time the embodiment of the civilization of al-Andalus itself; in the foreground, the Roman bridge crossing the Guadalquivir since 2000 years reminds that Cordoba was the capital of one of the richest provinces of the Roman Empire.

This IV Intensive Summer Course held in Casa Árabe Cordoba will introduce English speakers to the fascinating history of two empires: the Roman and the Islamic one. Specialists from different academic institutions will guide a select group of students in a series of seminar-style intensive classes throughout a week-long course.
This year, the course will focus on the processes of Romanization and Islamization that led to the formation of the Western Mediterranean first as a Roman and later on as an Islamic society. Together we will explore issues related to the sources at our disposal to reconstruct such processes (including literary sources and archaeological evidence) as well as the debates regarding their interpretation.

VENUE
The choice of the Casa Árabe in Córdoba as the venue for the course hardly needs any explanation. It is housed in the beautiful Casa Mudéjar, a 14-16th century building whose restoration received the World Heritage City Award 2011 from the Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports. The Casa is located at a three-minute walk from the Mosque-Cathedral.

THE STUDENTS AND COURSE STRUCTURE
The course is directed at university students and scholars who – regardless of their specialization – want to become familiar with the most relevant issues related to the history of al-Andalus. Taught in English, it aims at guiding the participants to the wide range of scholarly research on al-Andalus. Thirty students will be selected from among the applicants (for the application procedure see below).
Students are not required to have knowledge of Arabic or any other language except English; for those who are proficient in Arabic, guidance in the Arabic sources will be provided as a complement.
A basic bibliography of studies in English will be provided once the selection of students has been made and registration has been finalized. The students selected are expected to become familiar with that bibliography before the beginning of the course. A more comprehensive bibliography, including the most relevant studies in a variety of languages, will be provided during the course.
As the course is intensive and text-oriented, students are required to be present at each class. An attendance certificate will correspondingly be provided. For those interested in producing a research paper, assignments will be given and upon submission (within six months) an examination certificate can be obtained.

SCHEDULE
The course will take place during the fourth week of July, from Monday 23 to Saturday 28, with a total of 34 hours. On Friday, class will be held in the Umayyad palatine town of Madinat al-Zahra’. The course will be completed with two Archeological Workshops on Tuesday and Thursday morning.

LODGING AND MEALS
Coffee will be provided in the morning breaks and the fee includes as well a welcome reception and a dinner on Thursday. Students should arrange for the rest of their meals and lodging. Córdoba has many hotels and restaurants. A selection of the different options available around Casa Árabe will be provided upon registration.

APPLICATION AND FEE
Those interested are requested to send an e-mail message to infocordoba@casaarabe.es, indicating in the message subject line: Intensive Summer Course Al-Andalus IV. They need to provide a brief introduction about the candidate’s profile, including first and last names (maximum 300 words), and a letter expressing their interest in the course. The deadline is July 1th 2020. Those 30 selected will be contacted by July 3rd 2020. 

Once confirmation of admittance is received, registration must be completed using the application form that will be sent. The fee for the course is 300 €.

Further information: Calle Samuel de los Santos Gener, 9.
From Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 14:00 p.m. (infocordoba@casaarabe.es).

Web Resource: Prestapágina: Early Modern Spanish History and History of Art Bookshare

https://www.facebook.com/groups/prestapagina/

ARTES members are invited to join this Facebook group, to request and share scans (insofar as they do not violate U.S. or international copyright laws) of scholarly texts and primary sources in aid of remote research by independent and affiliated scholars of early modern Spain. The focus of this group is history and history of art, but all scholars of early modern Spain are welcome.

Open Access Publication: Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation, eds Tom Nickson and Nicola Jennings

Click here to read Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation, eds Tom Nickson and Nicola Jennings (London, 2020)

From the dazzling spectacle of Burgos Cathedral to the cavernous nave of Palma Cathedral or the lacy splendour of San Juan de los Reyes, Spain preserves a remarkable variety of inventive but little understood Gothic buildings. Yet Gothic architecture in Spain and the Spanish kingdoms has traditionally been assessed in terms of its imitation of northern European architecture, dismissed for its ‘old-fashioned’ or provincial quality, and condemned for its passive receptivity to ‘Islamic influence’. But did imitation really triumph over invention in the architecture of medieval Iberia? Are the two incompatible? Can inventio and imitatio offer useful or valid analytical tools for understanding Gothic architecture? And to what extent are invention or imitation determined by patrons, architects, materials or technologies? This essay collection brings together leading scholars to examine Gothic architecture from across Iberia from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century, and provides the first significant account of Spanish Gothic architecture to be published in English since 1865.

CANCELLED: ARTES Event: Self-Guided Tours of the National Gallery Exhibitions: Artemisia and Titian, Thursday 23 April 2020, 9:00 – 11:30 am

Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Self Portrait as Saint Catherine of Alexandria’, about 1615–17, National Gallery, London

Thursday 23 April 2020, 9:00 – 11:30 am

The National Gallery, London

You are cordially invited to self-guided tours of Artemisia and Titian. ARTES members will be able to access both exhibitions free of charge during the event (7 spaces are available).

9:00 am           

Entry via the Sainsbury Wing to the Artemisia exhibition (accessible via the Sainsbury Wing Entrance, to the far left of the main portico on Trafalgar Square, and descend to level -2). Names will be checked off a security list.

10:00 – 10:30 am

Coffee break at the National Gallery café.

10:30 – 11:30 am

Meet at the Titian exhibition entrance (via room 5) where exhibition curator Matthias Wivel will provide a brief introduction before the members’ self-guided tour.

Attendees may check their belongings into one of the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery. Please note that this event is by invitation only. Places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

We kindly ask you to RSVP to akemi.herraezvossbrink@ng-london.org.uk by Friday 17 April 2020.

New Funding Opportunity: John Phillip PhD Scholarship in Spanish art and visual culture at the School of Art History, University of St Andrews

Deadline: Monday 25 May 2020

The School of Art History at the University of St Andrews is delighted to invite applications for the John Phillip Doctoral Scholarship in Spanish Art and Visual Culture, to start in September 2020.

Generously funded by the Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica (CEEH), the doctoral scholarship is named after the nineteenth-century Scottish artist John Phillip (1817-1867), who travelled extensively in Spain, and whose work was strongly inspired by the art of Velázquez and Murillo.

The scholarship is available to both Home/EU and Overseas candidates, and is tenable for three years (full-time). It is a full scholarship, covering tuition fees, plus an annual stipend of £15,285 for living expenses, and an annual research allowance of £5,000.

The scholarship will fund a doctoral research project that focuses on the history of Spanish art and visual culture between ca. 1600 and 1700. We will also consider research projects devoted to the reception of seventeenth-century Spanish art in later periods, up to ca. 1900.

Applicants should apply via the University of St Andrews application process: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/research/

The deadline for applications is Monday 25 May 2020.

For informal queries, intending applicants may contact Dr José Ramón Marcaida (jrm32@st-andrews.ac.uk).

Click here for more information.