Tag Archives: Medieval

Lecture: Tom Nickson on ‘Sensing the Holy: Architecture and the Senses in Medieval and Early Modern Spain’

10-toledo-cathedral-11The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting a lecture on Tuesday, January 24th at 7.00pm by:

Tom Nickson (The Courtauld Institute of Art) presenting on: ‘Sensing the Holy: Architecture and the Senses in Medieval and Early Modern Spain’.

Wolfson Room (NB01), IHR Basement, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU).

All those who are interested in Medieval Studies are very welcome to attend!

Book Launch – Art in Spain & Portugal from the Romans to the Early Middle Ages by Rose Walker

ARTES member Dr Rose Walker of the Courtauld Institute of Art has recently launched her latest book on early art in the Iberian Peninsula. A discount is available to those ARTES members who would like to buy a copy. Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com for details.

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ARTES private visit to the V&A’s Opus Anglicanum exhibition, 9am, Weds 14 December

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The Toledo Cope (detail), copyright Toledo, Tesoro de la Catedral, Museo de Tapices y Textiles de la Catedral

 

The stunning exhibition of medieval English embroidery at the Victoria & Albert Museum includes several pieces long held in Spanish treasuries, including two wonderful copes from Toledo and Daroca. Curator Glyn Davies has kindly offered to take ARTES members on a private visit to the exhibition on Wednesday 14th December at 9am (ie before the exhibition opens to the public at 10am). Tom Nickson (ARTES Vice-Chair) will also speak briefly about how these English embroideries came to Spain, and their fate thereafter.

 

This event is open to ARTES members only. To join us (£35/£20) see details here. Members can confirm a place by emailing artesiberia@gmail.com, and should arrive at the V&A’s Secretariat Gate by 8.50am (NB, latecomers cannot be admitted).

Lecture: Eduardo Carrero Santamaria (University of Barcelona), ‘Gothic architecture in 13th- and 14th-century Spain and its historiography’. Courtauld Institute, 5.30pm, 28th October 2015

The first in a series of lectures on Spanish medieval architecture, hosted by the Courtauld Institute, and sponsored by Coll & Cortes

Lamperez, Palencia pierSince the late 19th century, scholarship on 13th– and 14th-century Spanish architecture has largely depended on formal analysis and systems of cataloguing. From this have emerged fundamental studies of cathedrals, including those of Burgos, León and Toledo, of monasteries such as Las Huelgas in Burgos, or of parish churches such as Santa Maria del Mar in Barcelona. But what are the premises of such approaches? As interest in gothic architecture wanes amongst early 21st-century art historians, some of Spain’s most significant buildings still lack basic analysis. And yet perhaps the biggest problem is not the absence of studies but their methods, mediated by contemporary contexts.

The lecture is open to all and free to attend, though it is recommended that you arrive by 5.20 in order to secure a seat.

Eduardo Carrero Santamaria is Professor of Art History at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Myths of Medieval Spain. Symposium, Courtauld Institute, 11 March

Detail of the Portico de la Gloria, Santiago de Compostela, late twelfth century

LAST MINUTE SPACES NOW AVAILABLE!

Myths of Medieval Spain. Symposium, Research Forum, Courtauld Institute of Art, 2-6.30, Weds 11 March 2015.

Attendance is free, but spaces are limited so you must register – NOW OPEN!

Four papers offer new ideas on a group of well-known sculptures and manuscripts from twelfth- and thirteenth-century Spain, exploring tensions between local and international concerns.

2: Introductory remarks, Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

2.10: Rose Walker (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Beatus manuscripts during the reign of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonor of England: a response to the fall of Jerusalem?

2.40: Rosa Rodríguez Porto (University of York)

Tvrpinus Domini gratia archiepiscopus: Notes on the Codex Calixtinus

3.10: James D’Emilio (University of South Florida)

The West Portals at Compostela and the Book of St. James: Artistic Eclecticism at a Cosmopolitan Shrine

3.40: discussion

4.15-5.15: tea

5.30-6.30:

Javier Martínez de Aguirre (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

The voices and the echoes: Saint James, Gregory the Great and Diego Gelmírez in Santiago de Compostela’s Puerta de Platerías

6.30: drinks reception

The Church in Western Iberia: International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 6-9, 2015

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The Church in Western Iberia (León, Asturias, Galicia, and Portugal).
International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 6-9, 2015
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Organiser: James D’Emilio, Department of Humanities, University of South Florida.
Five sessions:
Session 1016: Wednesday, July 8, 9:00 – 10:30
The Church in Western Iberia (León, Asturias, Galicia, and Portugal), I: Early Medieval Galicia
Session 1116: Wednesday, July 8, 11:15 – 12:45
The Church in Western Iberia (León, Asturias, Galicia, and Portugal), II: The Power of Tradition in the 11th- and 12th-Century Leonese Church
Session 1216: Wednesday, July 8, 14:15 – 15:45
The Church in Western Iberia (León, Asturias, Galicia, and Portugal), III: Women’s Religious Communities
Session 1316: Wednesday, July 8, 16:30 – 18:00
The Church in Western Iberia (León, Asturias, Galicia, and Portugal), IV: Cistercians and Their Patrons
Session 1516: Thursday, July 9, 9:00 – 10:30
The Church in Western Iberia (León, Asturias, Galicia, and Portugal), V: Books, Libraries, and Archives
Download the complete provisional programme and list of speakers here.

The International Medieval Congress (IMC) is organised and administered by the Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS). Since its start in 1994, the Congress has established itself as an annual event with an attendance of over 1,800 medievalists from all over the world. It is the largest conference of its kind in Europe.

2014-07-Ex ungue leonem-exh cat coverEx ungue leonem. Marble heads by the Master of Cabestany, Barcelona, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, 4 April – 28 September 2014.
The four marble heads displayed in Room 4 of the Museum are fragments from the doorway of Sant Pere de Rodes, carved in the second third of the twelfth century, a masterpiece attributed to the Romanesque sculptor the ‘Master of Cabestany’. His work has been found in several places in southern Europe, from Tuscany (Italy) to Navarre, although most of the examples conserved are to be found in northern Catalonia and Languedoc. The doorway they once belonged to was destroyed sometime between 1800 and 1825. The four heads are on loan from private collections, and from the museums of Girona and the Fitzwilliam, Cambridge.