Tag Archives: Medieval

Lunchtime talk: Tobias Capwell, ‘Bermejo and the armour of an archangel’, Sainsbury Wing lecture theatre, National Gallery, London, 24 June 2019, 1–1.45 pm

Bartolomé Bermejo, ‘Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil’ (detail), 1468 © The National Gallery, London

What is conveyed by the armour in Bermejo’s Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil?

In this talk, Tobias Capwell reveals how Renaissance artists used the rich imagery of arms and armour to communicate messages about power and faith.

Tobias Capwell is Curator of Arms and Armour at the Wallace Collection in London, Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, and an internationally acknowledged expert on Medieval and Renaissance weapons.

Please click here for more information.

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CFP: “Rethinking the Canon: Models, Categories and Prestige in Spanish Medieval Art”, 23–25 October 2019, Universidad Complutense, Madrid

CFP: The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400, Valladolid, June 7–8, 2019

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 Tabernacle-shrine from Mule,
Iceland, now in the Nationalmuseet
in Conpenhagen; c.1250.
Photo: Justin Kroesen

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

How to Submit: Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es.

Deadline: Friday 18th of January 2019.

All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Museu de Lleida: diocesà i comarcal.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th  of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th  of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

Updated Programme: COLLECTING SPAIN: SPANISH DECORATIVE ARTS IN BRITAIN AND SPAIN, Hochhauser Auditorium, Victoria and Albert Museum, 8 and 9 June 2018

V&ACoordinators: Ana Cabrera and Lesley Miller

This conference explores collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain from the 19thcentury onwards, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies aredrawnfrom the British and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organisedin joint sessions dealing with the same subject from British and then Spanish perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference includes poster sessions during the coffee breaks.

Click here to buy tickets

Programme

Friday, 8thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish Decorative Arts

10.00             Registration and collecting of conference packs; displaying of posters

10.20            Introduction

Ana Cabrera, V&A

10:30       Collecting, Display & Dissemination: The Changing Face of the Decorative Arts Collection at South Kensington, 1852-1873

Susanna Avery-Quash, National Gallery, London

Lustreware and Furniture

Chair: Holly Trusted, V&A

11.00             Collecting Spanish Lustreware at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Mariam Rosser-Owen, Asian Department, V&A

11:30            A Survey and History of the Collecting of Spanish Decorative Arts: Lustreware

Jaume Coll, Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia

12.00-12.30.     COFFEE BREAK

12:30      Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

Nick Humphrey, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A

13:00             Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid, 1880-1920

Sofía Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

13.30-14.30       LUNCH

Textiles and Fashion

Chair: Sonnet Stanfill, V&A

14:30             Following the Thread: Collecting Spanish Textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Ana Cabrera, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A

15:30             Textile Collecting in Catalonia

Silvia Carbonell, Centre de Documentació i Museu Tèxtil, Terrasa

16:00            Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Oriole Cullen, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

16:30             From Dress to Fashion: The Collection of The Museo del Traje

Helena López del Hierro, Museo del Traje, Madrid

16.30-17.00       TEA BREAK

Sculpture and Plaster Casts

Chair: Edward Payne, Auckland Castle Project

17.00             A Vogue for St Francis

Xavier Bray, Wallace Collection, London

17:30       Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the Profile of Spanish Art through Plaster Casts

Holly Trusted, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

18:00       Electrical Treasuries: The Decorative Arts Collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones, 1881-1915

María Bolaños, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

18.30-19.00       DISCUSSION

Saturday, 9thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish decorative arts continued

Silver

Chair: Antonia Boström, V&A

10:15       The Scholar, the Scoundrel and the Skater: How the V&A Collections of Hispanic Silver were formed

Kirstin Kennedy, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

10:45             Collecting Spanish Silver

Jesús Rivas, Universidad de Murcia

11.15-11.45COFFEE BREAK

Displaying, Interpreting and Conserving Spanish Decorative Arts

Chair: Christopher Wilk, V&A

11.45            Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative Analysis

Isabel Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

12.15             Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries at the V&A

Lesley Miller, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

12.45             The20th-century Galleries at the V&A

Corinna Gardner and Johanna Agerman Ross, Design, Architecture and Digital Department, V&A

13.15-14.15LUNCH

Displaying, Interpreting and conserving Spanish decorative arts

Chair: Joanna Norman, V&A

14.15             The Conservationof the Cast Courts. New Discoveries from Spanish Casts

Victor Borges, Conservation Department, V&A

14:45             Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland

Edward Payne, The Auckland Project

15.15             Closing remarks

Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Miguel González Suela, Directorate of the State Museum, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports

CFP: Maius Workshop Meeting: ‘Imagining Spain and Latin America Abroad’

Short, informal papers are invited for the next meeting of The Maius Workshop, a community of graduate students and early career researchers working on Iberian and Latin American arts, histories and cultures. For more information about the group, please visit their website.

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Édouard Manet
Monk in Prayer (1865)
MFA Boston

The meeting will take place in the Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute, London WC2R 0RN on June 11 2018, 6:00–7:30pm

The theme of the meeting is ‘Imagining Spain and Latin America abroad.’ Discussion may consider exchange, trade, and the foreign reception of Spanish and Latin American art and culture.

Informal presentations should last no longer than 15 minutes.

The Maius Workshop endeavours to create a supportive environment to present new ideas and talk through problems and open questions. Collaborative research is central to the group’s ethos, and it aims to encourage dialogue rather than showcase fully-resolved material.

If you are interested in attending or presenting your work, please email maiusworkshop@gmail.com before May 15, 2018.

New Online Course: MOOC Burgos: Deciphering Secrets of Medieval Spain

Med Seminar Seal.jpg

Roger Martinez is pleased to announce the launch of a new Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that specifically focuses on medieval Spanish paleography training. The course is called Burgos: Deciphering Secrets of Medieval Spain and it will be offered on a monthly basis on coursera.org at https://www.coursera.org/learn/burgos-deciphering-secrets-medieval-spain. The next class begins on 9 April 2018. This six-week course is intensive — it requires, on average, 10-12 hours of your time per week.

This is the first of three new MOOCs that offer intensive paleography training. Three additional MOOCs pertaining to the medieval/early modern history of Toledo, Plasencia, and Granada, will be launched over the next 3 to 9 months. These courses are in addition to an introductory course on medieval Spain titled, Coexistence in Medieval Spain: Jews, Christians, and Muslims, and another titled, Deciphering Secrets: The Illuminated Manuscripts of Medieval Europe.

Course Description: 
This advanced course focuses on two primary goals: (1) appraising how Jews, Christians, and Muslims shaped the history of medieval Spain and (2) mastering the craft of Spanish paleography, the skill of identifying Spanish handwriting in the 11th- through 15th-century manuscripts. Through the lens of the medieval history of Burgos, we dedicate 75% percent of our efforts to developing pragmatic expertise in the interpretation of Carolingian/French/Gothic handwriting.

Specifically, the course explores how the royal Castilian city of Burgos influenced, and was influenced by, Jews, Christians, and Muslims. We closely evaluate the Spanish Christian Reconquest, the Plague and the 14th-century Castilian civil war, anti-Jewish pogroms, the emergence of elite conversos (Jewish converts to Christianity), and the role of the king and Roman Catholic Church in the creation of Catholic Spain. Through onsite interviews in archives and museums in Burgos, we experience the medieval city, artifacts, and manuscripts. While we teach using Spanish manuscripts, very little or no knowledge of the Spanish language is necessary to complete the course.

Using an intensive array of paleography practices, exams, independent projects, and collaborative efforts, you will garner exceptional skills that you can apply to interpreting any medieval European handwriting. To demonstrate your mastery of paleography you will (1) create a 14th-15th-century alphabet, numeral, and abbreviation guide using manuscript images, and (2) transcribe one selection from a medieval manuscript.

Inquiries: rogerlmartinez@gmail.com