Tag Archives: Medieval

The Treasury of San Isidoro de Leon, symposium, Leon, 11-12 September 2018

Programme1

Programme2

Advertisements

Updated Programme: COLLECTING SPAIN: SPANISH DECORATIVE ARTS IN BRITAIN AND SPAIN, Hochhauser Auditorium, Victoria and Albert Museum, 8 and 9 June 2018

V&ACoordinators: Ana Cabrera and Lesley Miller

This conference explores collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain from the 19thcentury onwards, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies aredrawnfrom the British and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organisedin joint sessions dealing with the same subject from British and then Spanish perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference includes poster sessions during the coffee breaks.

Click here to buy tickets

Programme

Friday, 8thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish Decorative Arts

10.00             Registration and collecting of conference packs; displaying of posters

10.20            Introduction

Ana Cabrera, V&A

10:30       Collecting, Display & Dissemination: The Changing Face of the Decorative Arts Collection at South Kensington, 1852-1873

Susanna Avery-Quash, National Gallery, London

Lustreware and Furniture

Chair: Holly Trusted, V&A

11.00             Collecting Spanish Lustreware at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Mariam Rosser-Owen, Asian Department, V&A

11:30            A Survey and History of the Collecting of Spanish Decorative Arts: Lustreware

Jaume Coll, Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia

12.00-12.30.     COFFEE BREAK

12:30      Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

Nick Humphrey, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A

13:00             Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid, 1880-1920

Sofía Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

13.30-14.30       LUNCH

Textiles and Fashion

Chair: Sonnet Stanfill, V&A

14:30             Following the Thread: Collecting Spanish Textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Ana Cabrera, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A

15:30             Textile Collecting in Catalonia

Silvia Carbonell, Centre de Documentació i Museu Tèxtil, Terrasa

16:00            Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Oriole Cullen, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

16:30             From Dress to Fashion: The Collection of The Museo del Traje

Helena López del Hierro, Museo del Traje, Madrid

16.30-17.00       TEA BREAK

Sculpture and Plaster Casts

Chair: Edward Payne, Auckland Castle Project

17.00             A Vogue for St Francis

Xavier Bray, Wallace Collection, London

17:30       Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the Profile of Spanish Art through Plaster Casts

Holly Trusted, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

18:00       Electrical Treasuries: The Decorative Arts Collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones, 1881-1915

María Bolaños, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

18.30-19.00       DISCUSSION

Saturday, 9thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish decorative arts continued

Silver

Chair: Antonia Boström, V&A

10:15       The Scholar, the Scoundrel and the Skater: How the V&A Collections of Hispanic Silver were formed

Kirstin Kennedy, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

10:45             Collecting Spanish Silver

Jesús Rivas, Universidad de Murcia

11.15-11.45COFFEE BREAK

Displaying, Interpreting and Conserving Spanish Decorative Arts

Chair: Christopher Wilk, V&A

11.45            Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative Analysis

Isabel Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

12.15             Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries at the V&A

Lesley Miller, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

12.45             The20th-century Galleries at the V&A

Corinna Gardner and Johanna Agerman Ross, Design, Architecture and Digital Department, V&A

13.15-14.15LUNCH

Displaying, Interpreting and conserving Spanish decorative arts

Chair: Joanna Norman, V&A

14.15             The Conservationof the Cast Courts. New Discoveries from Spanish Casts

Victor Borges, Conservation Department, V&A

14:45             Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland

Edward Payne, The Auckland Project

15.15             Closing remarks

Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Miguel González Suela, Directorate of the State Museum, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports

CFP: Maius Workshop Meeting: ‘Imagining Spain and Latin America Abroad’

Short, informal papers are invited for the next meeting of The Maius Workshop, a community of graduate students and early career researchers working on Iberian and Latin American arts, histories and cultures. For more information about the group, please visit their website.

sc25548

Édouard Manet
Monk in Prayer (1865)
MFA Boston

The meeting will take place in the Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute, London WC2R 0RN on June 11 2018, 6:00–7:30pm

The theme of the meeting is ‘Imagining Spain and Latin America abroad.’ Discussion may consider exchange, trade, and the foreign reception of Spanish and Latin American art and culture.

Informal presentations should last no longer than 15 minutes.

The Maius Workshop endeavours to create a supportive environment to present new ideas and talk through problems and open questions. Collaborative research is central to the group’s ethos, and it aims to encourage dialogue rather than showcase fully-resolved material.

If you are interested in attending or presenting your work, please email maiusworkshop@gmail.com before May 15, 2018.

New Online Course: MOOC Burgos: Deciphering Secrets of Medieval Spain

Med Seminar Seal.jpg

Roger Martinez is pleased to announce the launch of a new Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that specifically focuses on medieval Spanish paleography training. The course is called Burgos: Deciphering Secrets of Medieval Spain and it will be offered on a monthly basis on coursera.org at https://www.coursera.org/learn/burgos-deciphering-secrets-medieval-spain. The next class begins on 9 April 2018. This six-week course is intensive — it requires, on average, 10-12 hours of your time per week.

This is the first of three new MOOCs that offer intensive paleography training. Three additional MOOCs pertaining to the medieval/early modern history of Toledo, Plasencia, and Granada, will be launched over the next 3 to 9 months. These courses are in addition to an introductory course on medieval Spain titled, Coexistence in Medieval Spain: Jews, Christians, and Muslims, and another titled, Deciphering Secrets: The Illuminated Manuscripts of Medieval Europe.

Course Description: 
This advanced course focuses on two primary goals: (1) appraising how Jews, Christians, and Muslims shaped the history of medieval Spain and (2) mastering the craft of Spanish paleography, the skill of identifying Spanish handwriting in the 11th- through 15th-century manuscripts. Through the lens of the medieval history of Burgos, we dedicate 75% percent of our efforts to developing pragmatic expertise in the interpretation of Carolingian/French/Gothic handwriting.

Specifically, the course explores how the royal Castilian city of Burgos influenced, and was influenced by, Jews, Christians, and Muslims. We closely evaluate the Spanish Christian Reconquest, the Plague and the 14th-century Castilian civil war, anti-Jewish pogroms, the emergence of elite conversos (Jewish converts to Christianity), and the role of the king and Roman Catholic Church in the creation of Catholic Spain. Through onsite interviews in archives and museums in Burgos, we experience the medieval city, artifacts, and manuscripts. While we teach using Spanish manuscripts, very little or no knowledge of the Spanish language is necessary to complete the course.

Using an intensive array of paleography practices, exams, independent projects, and collaborative efforts, you will garner exceptional skills that you can apply to interpreting any medieval European handwriting. To demonstrate your mastery of paleography you will (1) create a 14th-15th-century alphabet, numeral, and abbreviation guide using manuscript images, and (2) transcribe one selection from a medieval manuscript.

Inquiries: rogerlmartinez@gmail.com

Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages (6th-16th century), 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquaryCall for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

courtauldlogo

Introducing the Maius Workshop

Morgan Beatus Angel Sun Rev 19The Maius Workshop is an interdisciplinary group that brings together graduate students and early career scholars dealing with Hispanic art (broadly considered to include literature, theatre, music, etc.) and history from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period. The aim of the Maius Workshop is to encourage dialogue among specialists in different stages of their academic life and to provide a forum for discussing methods of information gathering and research news. The group is kindly supported by ARTES.

The workshop is named after the tenth-century painter of the Morgan Beatus manuscript as it wishes to create an interdisciplinary space where scholars of art and history can interact. Through a series of reading group meetings, the Workshop aims to bring together young researchers tackling the study of Hispanic culture and history and to create a strong network of specialists of Medieval and Early Modern Iberia and Latin America.

Thanks to the new connections that the group will create, the meetings will develop current research rather than present finished projects. The group’s activities are directed to the diffusion of the interest in Iberian and Latin American cultural creations, with the long-term aim of establishing a permanent community open to all students of Hispanic art and history.

The Maius Workshop’s first meeting will take place on Monday 16 October at 6 pm at the Warburg Institute. This will be an informal meeting and an opportunity to meet postgraduate researchers with similar interests, to discuss how these interests can be drawn together in a reading group setting. The meeting is open to MA, PhD and early career researchers. Refreshments will be provided.

If you are interested in the activities of this research group or would like to attend the meeting, please fill in this form

ARTES Coll y Cortés 2017 post-doctoral scholarship report: Dr Francisco de Asís García García, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

 

Fig. 2. Woven silk fragments. Victoria and Albert Museum, 275 and 275A-1894

Woven silk fragments. Victoria and Albert Museum inv. 275 and 275A-1894

I have carried out a three-month fellowship in London from March 1st to May 31st, 2017, conducting research in several museums, libraries and academic institutions of the city. My main goal was to study a selection of textiles from the Furniture, Textiles and Fashion (FTF) Department of the Victoria & Albert Museum. I have undertaken this work as an Erasmus + Visiting Fellow at the V&A’s Research Department in collaboration with the Marie S.-Curie project Interwoven (no. 703711) led by Dr Ana Cabrera Lafuente. Dr Cabrera acted as my fellowship’s supervisor and this granted me the opportunity of working closely to a specialist. Thanks to this, I have acquired new knowledge and methodological skills in the field of textiles.

Fig. 1. Working session at V&A Clothworkers' Centre

Working session at the V&A’s Clothworker’s Centre

I based my study on the examination of raw materials, weaving techniques, decorative patterns and iconography of textile fragments and ecclesiastical vestments related to Medieval and Early-modern Iberia. These pieces were selected in accordance with the interests of the Interwoven project and my own. The research also paid attention to the dispersion of connected fragments and pieces among different institutions and collections, identifying them through a comparison of their catalogues and online databases. The reading of records and files held at the V&A’s Archive related to acquisitions from Spain in the early decades of the Museum helped me to complete the biographical information of certain pieces. The physical examination of the textiles was carried out with Dr Cabrera at the Clothworkers’ Centre for the Study and Conservation of Textiles and Fashion, while the bibliographical and writing work took place at the V&A’s FTF Department. This research will allow the Museum to update their textile collections’ data and widen the scope of information accessible on the Museum’s own database and its online version ‘Search the Collections’.

Fig. 3. The Warburg Institute Library. 1st floor

The Warburg Library, first floor

Beyond my work at V&A, I was able to devote a few daily hours to library research at the Warburg Institute, SOAS, and the British Library. During these sessions, I dedicated my time to the gathering of bibliographical material for an ongoing study on the role of textiles in the fashioning of clerical dignity and the valuation of the ecclesiastical space during the central Middle Ages in Iberia. I presented the preliminary results of this research during the ‘Work in Progress Seminars’ held in the V&A’s Research Department with a talk entitled ‘Ecclesiastical textiles and vestments from Medieval Iberia: promoting the clergy and shaping sacred space in a reforming church’ (May 2nd, 2017). Moreover, the access to the bibliographical resources held at these institutions enabled me to update and enrich the contents and critical apparatus of the forthcoming publication of my PhD dissertation, focused on the Romanesque sculpture of the Cathedral of Jaca.

During my stay in London I was pleased to attend conferences on Medieval Iberian art and Islamic studies, particularly the symposium ‘Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation’ (The Courtauld Institute of Art, March 16th, 2017) and the workshop ‘Researching the Islamic State: New Challenges and Opportunities’ (UCL, March 28-29th, 2017), as well as lectures and seminars on Medieval sculpture, Late Gothic fashion and Arabic palaeography –among other topics– at The Courtauld and SOAS. I was also able to exchange ideas with scholars specialising in textiles and in Spanish Medieval Art as Drs Lesley Miller, Tom Nickson, Rose Walker, Kirstin Kennedy and Nicola Jennings, and benefit from their advice and research experience.

By Dr Francisco de Asís García García, Universidad Complutense de Madrid