Tag Archives: Painting

Featured Exhibition: Gala Salvador Dalí: A Room of One’s Own in Púbol, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, until 14 October

gala_placidia_esferes

Salvador Dalí. Gala Placidia. Galatea of the Spheres, 1952. Fundació Gala- Salvador Dalí, Figueres © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018

Gala (7th September 1894 – 10th June 1982), born into a family of intellectuals from Kazan (Russia), spent her childhood in Moscow before moving to Switzerland and then Paris. There she befriended such prominent members of the surrealist movement as Max Ernst. In 1929 she travelled to Cadaqués, where she met Dalí. The two fell in love and started to live together, first during an eight-year exile in the United States and then in Portlligat, New York and Paris.

Gala, an enigmatic and intuitive lady famous as Salvador Dalí’s wife, muse and model, is the subject of this exhibition. Abandoning traditional stereotypes on the role of this figure, the show follows her transformation into a fully-fledged artist, exploring her artistic cooperation with Dalí and revealing the possible shared authorship of some works.

Click here for more information.

Advertisements

Featured Exhibition: Michel Sittow. Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe, until 16 September at The Kumu Museum, Tallinn

michel_sittow_002

Born in Tallinn, Michel Sittow, studied in the studio of his father Clawes van der Sittow, a respected painter and wood carver. In 1484, the young artist headed to Bruges, the art centre of the Netherlands at the time, probably to work in the studio of Hans Memling, a German who was the town’s most sought-after master. There he learned the illusionist technique typical of the Netherlandish school of painting.

From 1492 to 1504, Michel Sittow was in the service of Isabella of Castile, and later worked as a portraitist for Philip the Handsome, Margaret of Austria, Ferdinand of Aragon and Christian II of Denmark. Sittow returned to his home-town of Tallinn, first in 1506 in connection with an inheritance dispute, when he joined the local artists’ guild. In 1514, Sittow left for Copenhagen at the invitation of King Christian II, and from there he went on to Spain and the Netherlands. The famous portraitist returned to Tallinn for good in early 1518.
With his diverse heritage (a family with German and Finnish-Swedish roots living in Tallinn) and cosmopolitan career, Sittow did not fit in with the national narrative of art history that prevailed in the first half of the 20th century. However, his cosmopolitan career is all the more relevant in the current European context.

The international exhibition project, which includes multi-faceted collaboration with centres in Europe and the United States, brings Sittow’s extraordinary works from distinguished museums and private collection to his first solo exhibition. This is a unique platform for a broader introduction and further research on the oeuvre of this remarkable artist. Most of Sittow’s small number of works (20 to 25 paintings) are on exhibit, thereby providing an excellent survey of his work as a portraitist and painter of religious works. It also allows us to view his art in a broader context, including in collaboration with Juan de Flandes and other contemporary Netherlandish artists. In addition to the paintings, another section of the exhibition is comprised of a timeline that provides an overview of the 500-year story of Michel Sittow, from his birth and successful career to his fall into oblivion and rediscovery.

The exhibition, which is a collaborative project of the Art Museum of Estonia and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will take place in 2018 in celebration of the centenary of the Republic of Estonia. This year also marks 500 years since Michel Sittow’s final return to his home-town of Tallinn.

Click here for more details.

Featured Exhibitions: ‘Zuloaga. Character and Emotion’, Centro Cultural Bancaja, Valencia (until 26 August 2018) and ‘Sorolla and Spirituality’ (until 2 September 2018)

ZuloagaZuloaga. Character and Emotion (until 26 August 2018)

This exhibition features some 66 paintings by the Basque artist, several of which are displayed in public for the first time. Ranging in date from 1888, when Zuloaga was 18, to 1945, the works trace the artist’s development from his training in Paris to the mature work inspired by Spanish artists such as Velázquez, Ribera, Zurbarán, Goya and El Greco. The curators, Sofía Barrón y Carlos Alonso, focus on Zuloaga as both a landscapist and a portraitist. They showcase his representations of turn-of-the-century aristocracy, bourgeoisie and intellectuals, as well as his intimate portraits of family members. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue and is organised in collaboration with the Museo Zuloaga in Pedraza (Segovia) and its president, the artist’s granddaughter, María Rosa Suárez Zuloaga.

SorollaSorolla and Spirituality (until 2 September 2018)

This exhibition features the work Yo soy el pan de la vida, exhibited to the public for the first time since its recent restoration, the result of a collaboration with the owners of the work, the Lladró family. Curated by Felipe Garín, the exhibition explores the religious themes which the Valencian artist explored briefly in the earlier part of his career. It comprises six works produced between 1883 y 1899, including ¡Triste herencia!, Monja en oración, Santa ClotildeMesa petitoria, and La Virgen María, all on loan from major public collections.

Featured Exhibition: Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, until 22 July 2018

p05k41y3

Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (Mexican, 1713–1772). Portrait of Doña Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas (detail), c. 1762. Galería Coloniart, Collection of Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andrés Siegel, Mexico City. Photo © Rafael Doniz

The vitality and inventiveness of artists in eighteenth-century New Spain (Mexico) is the focus of Pinxit Mexici, an exhibition which presents some 110 works of art (primarily paintings), many of which are unpublished and newly restored. The exhibition surveys the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlights the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. It is the first major exhibition devoted to this neglected topic.

The exhibition is divided in thematic sections: Great Masters; Masters Storytellers and the Art of Expression; Noble Pursuits and the Academy; Paintings of the Land; The Power of Portraiture; The Allegorical World; Imagining the Sacred.

Click here to find out more.

Opens today: Dibujos de Luis Paret (1746-1799) at the Biblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid

paret_cubierta-616x800Luis Paret y Alcázar (Madrid, 1746‒1799) has been hailed as a ‘spontaneous and joyful’ painter who allowed himself to be ‘overly’ influenced by French art. Labelled as the ‘Spanish Watteau’ and the most genuine representative of Rococo painting in the
country, he has long been considered the second most important painter of his day after Goya.

However, these considerations are a direct consequence of a historiographical discourse more concerned with contrasting the two artists than with attributing Paret’s heterodoxy (he was a pupil of La Traverse and court painter to the Infante Don Luis) to his eventful life, his artistic interests and his background.

The above factors provide a backdrop to Dibujos de Luis Paret (1746-1799). Open until 16 September, the exhibition is curated by Alejandro Martínez Pérez, a historian well versed in the Paret’s life and career who sets out to clarify the historiographical lacunae by examining the artist’s main instrument – his drawings – reconstructing his personal library and analysing his relationships with his patrons.

The show – featuring a total of 188 pieces including drawings (84), paintings, prints, books and manuscripts – has been made possible by the collaboration and loans of important private collections and institutions, both Spanish and foreign, such as the Museo Nacional del Prado, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the Real Academia
de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, the Rijksmuseum, the Real Academia Española, the Fundación Lázaro Galdiano and the Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas.

Organised by the BNE and the CEEH, the exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue raisonné of Luis Paret’s drawings, which is set to become a reference work for studies on the artist. Published by CEEH, the catalogue can be purchased here. Until 15 June, our readers can benefit from a 10% discount.

Fellowships for Spanish Colonial Art

 

brooklyn_museum_-_virgin_of_carmel_saving_souls_in_purgatory_-_circle_of_diego_quispe_tito_-_overall

Virgin of Carmel Saving Souls in Purgatory, Peru. Circle of Diego Quispe Tito, 17th century, collection of the Brooklyn Museum

Marilynn Thoma Fellowship 

The Marilynn Thoma Fellowship is the only unrestricted research funding in the United States devoted exclusively to the field of Spanish Colonial art. Each year from May 1 to October 15, pre- and post-doctoral scholars from across the world are invited to apply for research support in the amounts of $45,000 and $60,000, respectively. Recipients are selected by an international jury of three undisclosed experts in the field and notified in mid-December, with travel commencing within 18 months following notification. Selected scholars design their research projects independently, using funding in any reasonable way to accomplish their goals.

Fellowships range in duration from one to two years, and eventuate in major measurable outcomes, including museum exhibitions, dissertations, book publications, scholarly essays, and lecture series. While proposals are accepted from all of Spanish colonial Latin America and the Caribbean, the Foundation gives strong preference to projects that contribute to the history of painting and sculpture in colonial South America.

To apply, please complete the application via Slideroom.
Research and Travel Awards in Spanish Colonial Art 

Congruent with the Marilynn Thoma Fellowship, applications for the Thoma Foundation Research and Travel Awards in Spanish Colonial art are open from May 1 to October 15 of every year. Awards of up to $15,000 are available to independent scholars and advanced graduate students completing MA or PhD dissertations to help defray the costs of research-related expenses. Funding is provided each year to several scholars selected by an international jury of undisclosed experts in the field, with travel commencing within one year + one month from the date of notification. The Awards support research projects ranging in duration from 1 week to 3 months.

To apply, please complete the application via Slideroom.

Please contact info@thomafoundation.org if you have questions.

Three new acquisitions on show at the Prado Museum

Three important new acquisitions are temporarily on display at the Prado Museum in Madrid:

Saint John the Baptist in a Landscape, an oil on copper by Juan Bautista Maíno (1581–1649), strongly influenced by the artist’s Roman period.

12129_2

The copper plate for a print portraying an auto da fé in Madrid’s Plaza Mayor, engraved by in 1680 by Flemish artist Gregorio Fosman, one of the outstanding printmakers of the seventeenth century. The print is related to Francisco Rizi’s famous painting of the same subject, also in the Prado.

12129_3

Luis Paret’s A celestina [procuress] and the lovers, a work of 1784, inspired by the famous play La Celestina by Francisco de Rojas (1499), which foreshadows the satire of interpersonal relationships characteristic of Goya’s Caprichos 12129_1