Tag Archives: Painting

Extended: Murillo: The Self-Portraits now on until February 11, 2018

 

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Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Diego Ortiz de Zúñiga, ca. 1655, oil on canvas, private collection, United Kingdom; image courtesy of Sotheby’s

Until February 11, the Frick Collection in New York is celebrating Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, one of the outstanding painters of the Spanish Golden Age, who will turn 400 years old on 31 December. Well known for his religious paintings and his extraordinary depictions of street urchins, he was also an ingenious painter of portraits. This genre remains, however, the least studied aspect of his work. Inspired by the self-portraits in their holdings, New York’s Frick Collection and London’s National Gallery have co-organized a show which will move to London from February 28 through May 21, 2018.

As widely reported by the media, including the Guardian, an exceptional self-portrait by Murillo just discovered at Penrhyn Castle in Wales has been added to the show on account of its exceptionality.
Click here for more information on the show.
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ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholarship report: Sylvia Alvares-Correa (PhD Candidate, University of Oxford)

By Sylvia Alvares-Correa

joosvancleve

Joos van Cleve (attr.)
The Annunciation
1512-1520
Oil on oak panel
Museu de Arte Sacra do Funchal, inv. MASF35

joosvancleve2

Detail of figure 1

The generous award funds provided by ARTES Coll&Cortes allowed me to travel to Lisbon to investigate the transmission of Flemish art, designs, and techniques to Portugal in the late medieval period, on which my PhD research is based. The trip fortuitously overlapped with the exhibition ‘The Islands of White Gold, Art Commissions in Madeira: 15th and 16th Centuries’ at the Museu Nacional De Arte Antiga as well as the ‘Medieval Europe in Motion—The Middle Ages, A Global Context?’ conference hosted at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. Both introduced me to works of art and research with which I had not been familiar and underlined the complexity and ambiguity involved in defining artistic transmission.

quentinmetsys

Workshop or Circle of Quentin Metsys
Triptych of the Descent from the Cross
Oil on oak panel
Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Inv. 1285 Pint

The fluid movement of artists and designs between north and south during this period means that just because something looks Flemish doesn’t necessarily mean it is; unfortunately, ‘style’ is often the determinant factor in classifying the origin of artworks in museums as well as in literature. Production methods can help elucidate if not by who at least where an artwork was made. To this end, the research trip sponsored by ARTES Coll & Cortes allowed me to collect data on the different joinery methods used in 15th and 16th century panel painting. Specifically, I sought out works joined by perpendicular dowels. Internal dowels, the predominate joinery method found in the north, in some cases dictated by guild regulations, are less likely to disrupt the surface of the painting; perpendicular dowels, however, tend to protrude slightly to the surface over time and can often be discerned with the naked eye. Current research proposes that the latter joinery method was predominant exclusively in Portugal (though famously employed by Hugo van der Goes as well).

 

quentynmetsys2

Detail of figure 2

My preliminary investigations, however, yielded evidence that perpendicular dowels were utilized not only Portuguese panel paintings, but also in panels believed to be imported from Flanders. While it is too early to draw conclusions, the diversity of joinery methods observed suggest that either perpendicular dowels were not as uncommon to northern production as has been supposed or that certain works in Portuguese collections which have been classified as ‘Flemish’ were perhaps produced locally. I’m looking forward to delving in further!

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Murillo! Some Events in Seville

murillo_st_justa_and_st_rufina_2

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo 
Oil on canvas
200 x 176 cm
c. 1666
Museo de Bellas Artes, Seville

Baptised on 1 January 1618, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (d. 1682) became the leading painter of late seventeenth-century Seville. He completed several religious commissions, especially compelling and innovative representations of the Immaculate Conception. He was also an outstanding portraitist, as revealed in the exhibition Murillo: The Self-Portraitson view at The Frick Collection in New York until February 4. The painter also excelled in genre pictures of children, a production which made him extremely famous among foreign connoisseurs and collectors, especially in England and France in the eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century.

As noted in a contemporary document, Murillo had ‘all his life been a parishioner of la Magdalena [in Seville] without any notable absence’. His oeuvre and memory are closely connected to this city in the South of Spain, then a flourishing emporium for trade with Latin America.

Unsurprisingly, this year the city will celebrate Murillo’s 400th birthday with a number of large-scale cultural events and exhibition. Information on many of these can be found on a dedicated website, Murillo y Sevilla. Here are some highlights:

Murillo y los Capuchinos de Sevilla. Reconstrucción (Murillo and the Capuchins of Seville. Reconstruction), exhibition curated by Maria del Valme Muñoz at the Museo de Bellas Artes. Until 1 April 2018.

Murillo y su estela en Sevilla (Murillo and His Followers in Seville), exhibition curated by Benito Navarrete at the Espacio Santa Clara. Until 8 April 2018.

Murillo IV centenario (Murillo’s 4th centenary), exhibition curated by María Valme Muñoz e Ignacio Cano at the Museo de Bellas Artes. 29 November 2018–17 March 2019.

International Conference Murillo ante su centenario: perspectivas historiográficas y culturales (Murillo at 400: historiographical and cultural perspectives), 19–22 March 2018, Universidad de Sevilla.

Closing Soon: Zuloaga en el París de la Belle Époque, 1889-1914

1920px-countess_mathieu_de_noailles2c_by_ignacio_zuloaga

Ignacio Zuloaga
Portrait of the Countess Mathieu de Noailles
Oil on canvas
152 x 195.5 cm
1913
Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao

The art of Ignacio Zuloaga (Eibar 1870–1945 Madrid) is often associated with Romantic ideas of Spain’s Black Legend. This exhibition aims to show the painter in a different light, focusing on his connections with the innovations of Belle Époque Paris. The exhibition illuminates the Symbolist milieu in which the Spanish painter moved during his several stays in France. Curated by Leyre Bozal Chamorro and Pablo Jiménez Burillo, it features more than 90 works by such artists as Paul Gauguin, Pablo Picasso, Santiago Rusiñol, Émile Bernard and Auguste Rodin.

 

 

Zuloaga en el París de la Belle Époque, 1889-1914, Fundación MAPFRE Recoletos, Madrid, until 7 January 2018

Extended: Murillo: The Self-Portraits now on until February 11, 2018

 

6082

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Diego Ortiz de Zúñiga, ca. 1655, oil on canvas, private collection, United Kingdom; image courtesy of Sotheby’s

Until February 11, the Frick Collection in New York is celebrating Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, one of the outstanding painters of the Spanish Golden Age, who will turn 400 years old on 31 December. Well known for his religious paintings and his extraordinary depictions of street urchins, he was also an ingenious painter of portraits. This genre remains, however, the least studied aspect of his work. Inspired by the self-portraits in their holdings, New York’s Frick Collection and London’s National Gallery have co-organized a show which will move to London from February 28 through May 21, 2018.

As widely reported by the media, including the Guardian, an exceptional self-portrait by Murillo just discovered at Penrhyn Castle in Wales has been added to the show on account of its exceptionality.
Click here for more information on the show.

New Publication: El Greco comes to America: the Discovery of a Modern Old Master (CEEH, Center for Spain in America and Frick Collection, 2017)

greco-666x800El Greco comes to America: The Discovery of a Modern Old Master, directed by Inge Reist and José Luis Colomer
Este libro es un homenaje a los soberbios ejemplos de la obra del Greco
conservados en Estados Unidos. El estilo tan personal del artista tenía
un aire de modernidad que atraía a los coleccionistas de aquel país,
gracias a lo cual los museos americanos poseen muchos de los mejores
Grecos que hay fuera de España. Once especialistas abordan el estudio
de coleccionistas particulares como Arabella Huntington, Louisine
Havemeyer, Henry Clay Frick, Peter Widener y Duncan Phillips, pero
analizan también el impacto de las exposiciones en las que pudieron
verse obras del cretense y el papel que desempeñaron artistas-asesores
como Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent y Roger Fry.

Partiendo de una rica documentación de archivo, en gran parte inédita
hasta ahora, los autores de este volumen demuestran el denuedo con el
que los coleccionistas americanos compitieron por las obras del Greco y
el lugar tan destacado que concedieron en sus casas a los cuadros del
cretense, que a menudo colgaron junto a otros de pintores más modernos
como Degas o Manet. Al hacerlo, y al fomentar la compra de cuadros del
Greco por parte de las instituciones públicas que financiaban, forjaron
la reputación internacional de este artista entre el público
contemporáneo, garantizando un aprecio por su estilo único que se
mantiene todavía.

SOBRE LOS DIRECTORES [10]

INGE REIST, doctora por la Universidad de Columbia, donde dio clase
durante unos años, es directora del Center for the History of
Collecting de la Frick Art Reference Library. Dirigió también el
Archivo Fotográfico de la Frick Collection y fue presidenta de la
Association of Research Institutes in Art History. Es experta en
historia del coleccionismo, tema sobre el que ha publicado trabajos y
dado conferencias en numerosos museos y congresos. Ha coeditado con Gail
Feigenbaum _Provenance: An Alternative Art History_ (2012), aunque sigue
interesándose por otras cuestiones, como prueba su «_All the World’s a
Stage: The Theater Conceit in Early Modern Italy_» para el Blackwell
Companion to Renaissance and Baroque Art (2012).

JOSÉ LUIS COLOMER es doctor en Literatura Comparada por la Universidad
de Bolonia y licenciado en Historia del Arte por la Sorbona. Actualmente
dirige el Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica y el Center for Spain in
America. Sus investigaciones abordan las relaciones culturales entre
España e Italia en el siglo XVII a través de agentes diplomáticos y
del intercambio de regalos artísticos entre las cortes europeas y los
reyes de España, así como el segundo viaje a Roma de Velázquez y sus
vínculos con personajes italianos en la corte de Madrid. En 2012
codirigió con Inge Reist el libro Collecting Spanish Art: Spain’s
Golden Age and America’s Gilded Age.

264 páginas; 156 ilustraciones
ISBN: 978-84-15245-73-5
50 €
Until 15 December, 10% online discount, http://www.ceeh.es

Opening soon: Intacta María. Política y religiosidad en la España barroca, 30 November 2017 – 8 April 2018, Museo de Bellas Artes de Valencia

alegorc3ada_de_la_virgen_inmaculada2c_atribuida_a_juan_de_roelas_28museo_nacional_de_escultura_de_valladolid29The exhibition Intacta María. Política y religiosidad en la España barroca, opening on 30 November  2017, analyses the process through which devotion to the Immaculate conception was created and popularised in early modern Spain. While the Immaculate Conception only became dogma in 1854, as early as 1616 the Spanish Monarchy became a staunch supporter of the theory, turning its defence into a national priority. In the following years, the Immaculate Conception became Spain’s most heartfelt devotion and a sign of national identity. Art played an important role in this process, amounting to what we may describe as a marketing campaign. This will be the focus of the Museo de Bellas Artes’ forthcoming exhibition, featuring more than 50 paintings, sculptures, prints and books borrowed from notable Spanish museums and churches such as the Museo Nacional de Escultura de Valladolid, the Cathedral of Seville, the Biblioteca Nacional de España, and many others.

 

Please click here for more information on the exhibition.