Category Archives: Lecture

Lecture: Dr Pedro Cardim, ‘Reassessing the Portuguese Colonial Past: New Scholarly Perspectives and Political Activism’, Centre for the Study of International Slavery/Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 6 February 2020

Thu, 6 February 2020

17:30 – 19:00 GMT

502 Teaching Hub, TR4

160 Mount Pleasant

Liverpool

L3 5TR

Free but please register at this link

Over the past two decades, Portugal’s colonial rule in Asia, South America, and Africa has been subject to increasingly intense debate both within academe and society at large. Innovative research has begun to question benign and Euro-centric approaches to the Portuguese imperial past and has now arrived at profoundly different views which expose the violent and exploitative character of colonial rule.

This set of new perspectives on Portugal’s colonial past, however, is also the result of an unprecedented involvement of activists and civic groups in public debate. One important example are the Associations of Portuguese of African descent, which campaign against still-prevailing forms of celebrating the Portuguese colonial past. These include the recent decision to create a ‘Museum of Discovery’ dedicated to Portugal’s maritime glory, or the monument dedicated to the Jesuit missionary António Vieira.

Scholarly revision and community activism both face hostile opposition. This talk discusses the main developments in an ongoing debate that continues to intensify, and that in itself highlights the importance of fostering critical debate about Portugal’s colonial past.

Professor Pedro Cardim’s main area of research is the history of the early modern Iberian world, with a focus on the interactions between Portugal and the Spanish Monarchy. He also works on the Portuguese colonial empire and the early modern Atlantic world. He has published numerous books and articles, including Portugal y la Monarquía Hispánica, ca.1550–ca.1715 (2017) and Polycentric Monarchies: How Did Early Modern Spain and Portugal Achieve and Maintain a Global Hegemony? (2012, with Tamar Herzog, Gaetano Sabatini and José Javier Ruiz Ibáñez). He has held visiting professorships at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, New York University, Université de Toulouse Jean Jaurès, and Universidad Pablo de Olavide (Seville).

For a podcast featuring Professor Cardim, see here: http://historyhub.ie/pedro-cardim-hispania-portugal-spanish-monarchy-16th-17th-century.

Islamic Art Circle Lecture: The Hadassah and Daniel Khalili Memorial Lecture in Islamic Art and Culture, Dr Heather Ecker, ‘The First Congregational Mosque of Córdoba’, 15 January 2020, 7–9pm, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, SOAS

Islamic Art Circle Lecture: The Hadassah and Daniel Khalili Memorial Lecture in Islamic Art and Culture, Dr Heather Ecker, ‘The First Congregational Mosque of Córdoba’, 15 January 2020, 7–9pm, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, SOAS
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Islamic Art Circle Lecture: Professor Luis José García-Pulido, ‘Water to Create a Paradise on Earth. The Alhambra and its Hydraulic Supply System’, SOAS, 4 December 2019, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Wolfson Lecture Theatre, 7:00–9:00pm

Islamic Art Circle Lecture: Professor Luis José García-Pulido, ‘Water to Create a Paradise on Earth. The Alhambra and its Hydraulic Supply System’, SOAS, 4 December 2019, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Wolfson Lecture Theatre, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

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Zurbarán Fellow Public Lecture: Dr Luis Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez, ‘The empire strikes back: Baroque art and Spanish contemporary culture’, 12th November at 5.30 pm, Kenworthy Hall, St Mary’s College, Durham University

Hispanic identity has been shaped during the last century by a conscious selection of historical periods of its history. After the loss of the last colonies of the former Spanish Empire at the end of the 19th century, the nation had hit rock bottom in political terms. To counterbalance this decline, writers, poets, essayists and scholars from the so-called generation of ’98 aimed for the restoration of the cultural splendor of the Spanish Golden Age, a period of flourishing in the arts and literature that spans from Philip II’s reign until the death of Charles II in 1700, the last of the Habsburg monarchs. This wish has been constant through the 20th century and is also connected with the rise of neobaroque aesthetics and postmodernism. Baroque has become a multifaceted concept and, nowadays, is more a space of reflection than a chronological or formal label. The lecture will explore the continuity of baroque art in Spanish contemporary culture such as art, photography, cinema, pop music, comics, cartoons, internet memes, football or television series, where the fascination with Spanish Golden Age is not only a matter of style or aesthetics but also political and identitary. From inspiration to appropriation, from art galleries to politics, baroque art is a powerful tool in contemporary Spain.

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Celebrating the Prado: A Day of Special Events at the National Gallery, London, 30 September 2019

The National Gallery will celebrate the 200th anniversary of Spain’s foremost artistic institution, the Museo del Prado in Madrid, with a day of special events. Read below or click here to discover what’s on.

In conversation: Celebrating 200 years of the Prado

Lunchtime talk, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London, Monday 30 September 2019, 1–1.45pm

Miguel Falomir © Archivo Fotográfico. Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

Discover Madrid’s Prado Museum: past, present and future. Miguel Falomir, Director of the Prado Museum, Madrid, joins Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery, to discuss the history and dynamic future of Spain’s most eminent art museum, which celebrates its bicentenary this year.

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Picasso and the Prado

Lunchtime talk, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London, Monday 30 September 2019, 2–2.45pm

Pablo Picasso in Antibes, Summer 1946

The Prado Museum in Madrid held a special place in Picasso’s heart and mind. As a young artist he visited the museum many times, drawn to the world of El Greco and Velázquez. Later, in 1936, the Spanish Republic awarded him the title of Honorary Director-in-Exile of the Prado Museum in gratitude for his support. In 1957 he created a series of 58 variations of Velázquez’s ‘Las Meninas’, the iconic work in the Prado. Art historian Gijs van Hensbergen tells the story of Picasso’s life-long relationship with the Prado.

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Black and light: Discover the mystique of the Prado Museum by night

Film Screening and Q&A, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London, Monday 30 September 2019, 3–5.20pm

© 2017- Alvaro Perdices

Join award-winning film-maker Álvaro Perdices for a screening of his stunning 2015 film ‘Negro y Luz’, an artistic essay on darkness and light exploring the Prado Museum at night.

3 pm Introduction to the film with Álvaro Pedrices
3.10 pm Film showing of Negro y Luz (2015)
5.30 pm Q&A with Álvaro Perdices
5.40 pm Close

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Lecture: ‘Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance’, by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, Conference Room 1, National Gallery, London, 4 September 2019, 2:30–3:30pm

ARTES committee member Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, assistant curator of the exhibition “Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance” at The National Gallery, will give a lecture on the life and works of this Spanish painter.

Bartolomé Bermejo was a fifteenth-century Spanish artist whose painting technique, mixing Spanish and Netherlandish features, was unparalleled amongst his Iberian contemporaries. He had a limited output of less than twenty paintings of which seven are featured in the current National Gallery exhibition. This is the first time that six of these paintings are shown in the UK and the restoration of the National Gallery’s painting of Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil (1468) has enabled the Gallery to showcase Bermejo’s earliest masterpiece. Following the two major Bermejo retrospectives at the Prado Museum and the MNAC (Barcelona), this exhibition features paintings ranging from different periods of Bermejo’s career demonstrating his development as he moved throughout the Crown of Aragon (mostly encompassing territories in eastern Spain). This talk will focus on the seven paintings shown in the exhibition considering them within their context and retracing Bermejo’s artistic career. Bermejo’s Saint Michael, the Acqui Terme triptych and the Desplà Pietà (reproduced above), will receive special attention in the lecture, which will compare their donors, production, intended location and historical context.

This event is for a general audience and is organised by the Instituto Cervantes — London. Free, reistration required. Click here to register.