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TONIGHT: ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre Seminar Series | Andy Beresford, St Barbara, the Severed Breast, and the Problem of Pious Pornography

We are pleased to announce that the seventh seminar of our autumn online Research Seminar Series will take place tonight, Wednesday, 1 December at 6.00 PM, UK time:

Andy Beresford (Durham University), St Barbara, the Severed Breast, and the Problem of Pious Pornography

In recent years critics have argued that hagiography provides a doctrinally licit forum for visualizing and memorializing representations of the naked female body. Characterized as phallically charged objects of power and desire, implements of coercion and torture displace the act of rape while procedures of scopic objectification transform the saintly victim into a locus of voyeuristic and fetishistic pleasure. The male observer is figured by implication as a potential rapist in the hagiographic plot. Yet, how watertight is this thesis, and for whose benefit is the gaze sexualized? Perhaps more fundamentally, can an issue as complex as gender be fully and properly understood in a critical vacuum that excludes representations of the naked male subject? Is it really true that all male observers approach Barbara’s forced mastectomy by raping her with their eyes, or can theories of alterity be exploited as a hermeneutic for the development of a more nuanced and culturally sensitive approach towards the problem of sexualized violence? If so, what specifically could be said about the unique socio-cultural characteristics of early Iberian society and the mechanisms of narrative elaboration embraced by artists in the fourteenth- and fifteenth-century retable?

Andy Beresford is Professor of Hispanic Studies at Durham University. He has published widely on the legends of the saints, including books on St Agnes (2007), Sts Thaïs and Pelagia (2007), St Agatha (2010), and most recently, St Bartholomew (2020). He is currently working on a study of the corporeality of martyrdom in early Iberian art and literature.

Register here: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=i9hQcmhLKUW-RNWaLYpvlNMF-qNhnXNCmAShgOHLsKdUREU0M0RJTjAzSUpIVlFaTzZWRlQzSlQwSy4u

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

TONIGHT: ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre Seminar Series | Javier Ortiz Echagüe (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos), Charles Clifford in Madrid. Dreams of Modernity, 6pm GMT

We are pleased to announce that the sixth seminar of our autumn online Research Seminar Series will take place tonight, Wednesday, 24 November at 6.00 PM, UK time:   

In 1850, the Welsh photographer Charles Clifford settled in Madrid, where he lived until his death in 1863. During this period he developed an extensive work of documentation of historical monuments and cities all over Spain. His work in Madrid, however, is somewhat different. In the capital he does not document medieval or baroque monuments, but focuses on a city in transformation, in which large engineering projects and urban reforms play a fundamental role. In a period of political and economic instability, Clifford shows the attempt to turn Madrid into a modern capital, capable of taking on the great development it was to undergo in the last decades of the 19th century.

Javier Ortiz-Echagüe is a professor of art history at the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (Madrid). He has curated several exhibitions, such as Val del Omar’s Desbordamiento (Museo Reina Sofía 2010), Ortiz Echagüe. North Africa (Museo Nacional de Catalunya, Barcelona 2014) and, recently, Charles Clifford in Madrid. Dreams of Modernity (Fundación Canal de Isabel II, Madrid 2021). He is the author of the essay Yuri Gagarin and the Count of Orgaz. Mística y estética de la era especial (Fundación Museo Jorge Oteiza, Pamplona 2014), and coordinator, together with Horacio Fernández, of the catalogue Photobooks. Spain 1905-1977 (Museo Reina Sofía, 2014).

Register here: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=i9hQcmhLKUW-RNWaLYpvlNMF-qNhnXNCmAShgOHLsKdUREU0M0RJTjAzSUpIVlFaTzZWRlQzSlQwSy4u

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

TOMORROW: ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre Seminar Series | Claudia Hopkins, Romantic landscape painting as an Expression of National Fantasy

We are pleased to announce that the fifth seminar of our autumn online Research Seminar Series will take place tomorrow, Wednesday, 17 November at 6.00 PM, UK time:   

Claudia Hopkins, Romantic landscape painting as an Expression of National Fantasy

The Galician artist Genaro Pérez Villaamil (1807-1854), the founder of Spanish landscape painting, enjoyed royal patronage in Spain and attracted international collectors and art critics. His premature death was perceived as a major loss by the Spanish art world and reported in the international press. Yet, today, Villaamil is hardly known outside Spain. This neglect is symptomatic of the general indifference towards nineteenth-century Spanish art, especially in academia and the museum sector outside Spain. The purpose of this talk is therefore twofold: first, it will address the prejudiced positions that underpin the current understanding of the place (or absence) of Spanish artists, such as Villaamil, in narratives of nineteenth-century European art. Second, it will examine Villaamil’s landscape paintings as an expression of a cultural nationalism and consider their significance within the wider context of European painting. 

The talk relates to the exhibition España romántica: David Roberts y Genaro Pérez Villaamil (Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, Madrid, 6 Oct. 2021 – 16 Jan. 2022).

Register here: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=i9hQcmhLKUW-RNWaLYpvlNMF-qNhnXNCmAShgOHLsKdUREU0M0RJTjAzSUpIVlFaTzZWRlQzSlQwSy4u

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

TOMORROW: Zurbarán Centre/ARTES Seminar Series, 3 November, 6.00 PM | Adam Jasienski, ‘Hablando a nuestro modo’: Art and Didacticism in Early Modern Hispanic Writing

We are pleased to announce that the fourth seminar of the Zurbarán Centre-ARTES autumn Research Seminar Series will take place on Wednesday, 3 November at 6.00 PM (GMT).    

Adam Jasienski, ‘Hablando a nuestro modo’: Art and Didacticism in Early Modern Hispanic Writing

Discussions of painting and sculpture permeate early modern Spanish books of jurisprudence, religious doctrine, and political history. Why did writing about the making and viewing of art, broadly understood, lend itself to discussing difficult concepts in non-artistic fields? Painting and sculpture were intellectual endeavors that mediated between human and divine realms but they were also artisanal and handmade. This duality granted them broad conceptual applicability, encouraging numerous thinkers to deploy them metaphorically in the service of epistemology.

Please register here: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=i9hQcmhLKUW-RNWaLYpvlNMF-qNhnXNCmAShgOHLsKdUREU0M0RJTjAzSUpIVlFaTzZWRlQzSlQwSy4u

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

Luisa Roldán – Recording of the online discussion/book launch and a special offer to purchase the book now available

For those who missed it, please find the recording of the book launch for the new monograph, Luisa Roldán. Author Catherine Hall-van den Elsen was joined in conversation by ARTES co-founder Holly Trusted to explore the life and works of this celebrated sculptor of the Spanish Golden Age

Recorded talk published on Lund Humphries’ youtube channel

Order the book:

Customers in the UK and rest of the world (excluding North America) can order from Lund Humphries. Customers in North American can order the book from Getty Publications.

Special Offer:

To celebrate the launch of the first volume in the new series Illuminating Women Artists, both Lund Humphries and Getty Publications are offering a 20% discount on copies of Luisa Roldan. Enter code WomenArtists20 at checkout to apply the discount. Valid until end 31 October 2021.

For more information on Lund Humphries books and events sign up to their monthly newsletter here.

Zurbaran Centre-ARTES Seminar, 20 October, 6.00 PM | Lisandra Estevez, Jusepe de Ribera’s Otherness: Identity and Representation in Early Modern Iberian Art

We are pleased to announce that the second seminar of our autumn online Research Seminar Series will take place on Wednesday, 20 October at 6.00 PM, UK time:   

Lisandra Estevez: Jusepe de Ribera’s Otherness: Identity and Representation in Early Modern Iberian Art

This talk takes a closer look at Ribera’s otherness as an artist. It first considers Ribera’s marginalized status in Spain, possibly because of his Morisco (converted Muslim) or Converso (converted Jewish) ancestry. The artist was painfully cognizant of his low status and commented on Spain’s ill-treatment of him “as a cruel stepmother to her children,” as famously recorded by the art theorist and painter Jusepe Martínez. While his ancestry remains speculative, specific biographical details have suggested that he might have been of Morisco ancestry. Second, Ribera’s subject position as an “other” informed his interpretation of innovative and unconventional content. In specific, this presentation will consider Ribera’s representations of Turkish men, such as his drawing of The Turkish Dignitary and other Figures (1630s, Madrid, Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando) and A Potentate Accompanied by His Halberd Bearer, c. 1625-1630, Los Angeles, J. Paul Getty Museum). These proto-orientalist images have often been deemed fanciful or exotic, but a closer look at them reveals complex European and non-European identity constructs, respectively. Moreover, as an artist who might have left Spain due to social prejudices yet who promoted himself as a Spanish artist working in the Iberian dominion of Naples under the protection of its viceroys, Ribera paradoxically occupies a third or “in-between” space. Arguably, this intersectionality merits further introspection.

You can join the seminar by clicking on the following zoom link: https://durhamuniversity.zoom.us/j/92019390916?pwd=aVd1ZGFUVm96T01yRzFrQkNIVWtJZz09

Meeting ID: 920 1939 0916

Passcode: 017679

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

TONIGHT: ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre Seminar Series begins with a talk on the Factum Foundation at the Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland: Rethinking the relationship between Authenticity and Originality, 6pm BST

Join us tonight for the first talk in our ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre 2021 Autumn Seminar Series

Adam Lowe and Charlotte Skene Catling: In Ictu Oculi – In the Blink of an Eye. Rethinking the relationship between Authenticity and Originality

The seminar introduces the innovative exhibition display curated by the Madrid-based Factum Foundation and Skene Catling de la Peña at the new Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland, which incorporates a collection of facsimiles of paintings, sculptures and architecture. Among them are the sepulchre of Cardinal Tavera by Alonso Berruguete, a sculpture of the risen Christ by El Greco in its tabernacle from the Hospital de Tavera, the memento mori paintings by Valdés Leal from the Hospital de la Caridad, carvings and tiles from various buildings, such as the Casa de Pilatos.

This thought-provoking talk will address issues of technology, new approaches to museum display, aura and authenticity, whilst also providing insights into the creativity and thinking that underpinned the visual arts in early modern Spain.

You can join the seminar by clicking on the following zoom link: https://durhamuniversity.zoom.us/j/92019390916?pwd=aVd1ZGFUVm96T01yRzFrQkNIVWtJZz09

Meeting ID: 920 1939 0916

Passcode: 017679

For further information on Factum Foundation and their work at the Spanish Gallery (due to open on 14 October), please see: https://www.factumfoundation.org/ind/627/the-auckland-project

The seminar series has been jointly organised by the Zurbarán Centre and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group in association with the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes.

The event is free and open to all. Please click here for the full programme and more information on the seminar series.

2021 ICMA Forsyth Lecture Online: Julia Perratore, Assistant Curator, The Met Cloisters, ‘Representing Medieval Spain at The Met Cloisters’, Thursday, 14 October 14, 1-2 PM CT / 2-3 PM ET / 7-8 PM BST

Fuentidueña Chapel Gallery, The Met Cloisters, Copyright © 2021 International Center of Medieval Art.

Please click here to register.

Communities of Christians, Muslims, and Jews lived side by side in Spain for centuries, creating vibrant artistic traditions that often intersected. At The Met Cloisters, however, interactions between faiths in the medieval Iberian Peninsula have not always been visible. In the Forsyth lecture, Julia Perratore, Assistant Curator of Medieval Art, The Met Cloisters, will discuss the process of planning and implementing Spain, 1000-1200: Art at the Frontiers of Faith, an exhibition which addresses this aspect of the museum’s permanent display.

For the first time since its inauguration at The Cloisters in 1961, the Fuentidueña Chapel gallery, which typically focuses on the Christian tradition, will present a group of works that testify to the diversity of Spanish medieval art. By telling a more nuanced story in this space, the exhibition demonstrates the ease with which objects and artistic ideas transcended differences of belief. Placed in dialogue with each other, the silk textiles, ivory carvings, illuminated manuscripts, frescoes, and monumental sculptures featured in the show reveal a dynamic, interconnected past that often mirrors the present. The exhibit opened on August 30, 2021, and will continue through January 30, 2022.

The webinar is made possible by the International Center of Medieval Art’s Forsyth Lecture fund with additional support from the UA Department of Art and Art History Visiting Artists and Scholar lecture fund.

Local Organizer: Jennifer M. Feltman, The University of Alabama, Department of Art and History, in collaboration with Erika Loic, Florida State University, Department of Art History

Hosted by The University of Alabama

For more info, see https://art.ua.edu/news/cloisters-curator-to-speak-on-medieval-spain/

The ICOM-ICDAD 2021 Virtual Conference, ‘Revivals’, is open for registration

Please see the conference’s Eventbrite page to register.

Attendance is open to anyone regardless of ICDAD membership, but we urge attendees to join ICDAD to enjoy the full benefits of membership. 

Please note: when you register, you will receive a confirmation email that includes a Zoom link that is valid for all three days of the conference. 

The schedule is below (NB: all start times are listed for Paris and New York, respectively):

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21

16:00 Paris // 10:00 AM USA Eastern

Opening Remarks

Session 1: Creating History

Lieske Huits — “Modern Ornaments” or “Models of Ancient Production”? Egyptian Revival Jewelry from the Brogden Album

Martina Pall — The Revival of Chivalry in the 19th Century, Using the Example of a Room Stove

Christian Hörack — The Goldsmith Studio Bossard in Lucerne, a Swiss Contribution in the Age of Historicism

17:30 Paris // 11:30 AM USA Eastern

Session 2: ICDAD General Meeting

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22

14:00 Paris // 8:00 AM USA Eastern

Session 1: Material

Ludmila Budrina — Russian Tradition of the Artistic Application of Hard Stone (“pietra dura”)

Anaïs Alchus & Edouard Papet — Reconsidering an Icon of Revivals: the Life-Size Biscoúit Porcelain Statue of Bernard Palissy by Gille Jeune (1860)

Samantha Coleman — The Viennese Enamel Revival Objects in the Medeiros e Almeida Collection

15:30 Paris // 9:30 AM USA Eastern

Session 2: Cultural Identity

Virginie Desrante — Sèvres Porcelain Manufactory Heritage in the 19th Century: New Thoughts on Néo-Sèvres by Sèvres

Mark Sagona — Baroque Revival Currents in the Decorative Arts in Malta,1870-1900

Susan Rawles — Home-Making: Nostalgia and The Country House Style

10:45 Eastern/16:45 Paris

Session 3: 20th and 21st Century Revivals

Melinda Farkasdy — The Verőce Super Group: Emerging Ceramists, and The Passion for Wood Fired Pottery

Kim Mawhinney — Parian Porcelain to Political Power: The Influence of the Belleek Pottery on Contemporary Artists

Christian Roden — A Museum Makes Landfall: The Kungsholm, The American Swedish Historical Museum, and the Rise of Swedish Design in America

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23

8:00 Eastern USA/14:00 Paris

Session 1: National Romanticism

Cristina Neiva Correia — Revivals Fit for the King of Portugal: A Pair of Vases with Celebrities of the 15th and 16th centuries, by Sèvres

Ludmila Dementieva — “Encyclopedia” of Styles in the Objects of Russian Artistic Metal from the Collection of State Historical Museum

Anna-Sophie Laug — Rural Revival 1900: Vernacular Aesthetics in European Decorative Arts Between Historicism and Art Nouveau