Tag Archives: National Gallery London

CEEH Curatorial Fellow in Spanish Paintings at The National Gallery

This post, supported by the CEEH (Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica), is a 22 month traineeship for someone who has a good scholarly art historical background in European paintings and a special interest in Spanish paintings, who wishes to pursue a museum career. The Curatorial Fellow will have the opportunity to be involved in a full range of curatorial activities, including special projects, with a particular focus on Spanish paintings in the period 1450 to post-1800.

To apply or for more information, please see: https://nationalgalleryjobs.ciphr-irecruit.com/templates/CIPHR/jobdetail_1281.aspx

Reflections on the ARTES visit to ‘Artemisia’ at the National Gallery (by Susan Wilson)

We waited in Trafalgar Sq last Wednesday to go in at 9:30 for an ARTES private viewing of Artemisia. A cold grey London Morning with people out, hurrying through the handsome classical space, St Martins-in the Fields looking austere and fine. A grey day in winter suits the square.

Inside, empty rooms and the chance to take time to see the paintings. We all felt over-excited to be back in the National Gallery and were thankful to Letitzia Treves, the exhibition curator, and Lucy Chiswell, her assistant, for making the visit possible, as it was cancelled in November. We locked down, the very next day.

There was good discussion amongst the members, wide-ranging conversation, and reunions among friends after being isolated. Muffly chats in masks.

I am fond of the loan from Pozzuoli -St Januarius being taken to the coliseum in
Pozzuoli to be martyred with a huge wolf snarling, at his side, and giant bears/lions who look a bit sweet, sinking in homage at his feet, tamed by his presence, having come in to attack. It is for me, as a painter, a good example of how a commission is pieced together. Had Artemisia seen a lion? It is an excellent loan, tender, and compelling. A painting we mightn’t have seen, no matter how thoroughly we visit churches in the Bay of Naples.

Finest for me was Susanna and the Elders from Pommersfelden (detail included below). It is worth the visit alone, as is The Right Hand of Artemisia Gentileschi holding a Brush, a soft black and red chalk drawing on loan from the Prints and Drawings department of the the British Museum.

detail of ‘Susannah and the Elders’ (1610, Kunstsammlungen Graf von Schönborn, Pommersfelden), photographed by Susan Wilson

We do Plan more visits for the future!
Susan Wilson, ARTES

REMINDER: Artemisia Gentileschi Visit to the National Gallery on November 5th

Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Self Portrait as a Lute Player’, c. 1615-17, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut. Charles H. Schwartz Endowment Fund 2014.4.1 © Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

ONLY 2 PLACES STILL AVAILABLE

Please contact Susan Wilson at <susanruddwilson@gmail.com> asap if you wish to attend. 

We are pleased to let ARTES members know that a small visit to Artemisia Gentileschi will take place on Thursday  November 5th at 0915.

Gentileschi spent some years working in Naples (from 1630- until her death, thought to have occurred in 1652, when it was part of the Spanish Empire.) Her  patrons  included Phillip IV and his ambassadors and Viceroys, eg The Duke of Alcala. We thought it made sense to visit the exhibition and follow on developing our understanding of the Spanish in Naples. 

Due to the pandemic places are limited, to 10 only, masks must be worn and social distancing  of 2 metres observed. We cannot form groups as we go through the exhibition. 

If you want to include “Titian” please make an online booking for later that morning as  combining the two exhibitions is not now possible due to the pandemic.

Meet Susan Wilson at the Sainsbury Wing Entrance at 0900 to enter at 0915. 

Latecomers cannot be admitted. NB: If you reserve a place and cannot attend please let me know immediately as we can run a waiting list for this visit, but I would need to swap names over.

Please contact Susan Wilson at <susanruddwilson@gmail.com> asap if you wish to attend. 

ARTEMISIA GENTILESCHI VISIT TO THE NATIONAL GALLERY ON NOVEMBER 5TH

Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Self Portrait as a Lute Player’, c. 1615-17, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut. Charles H. Schwartz Endowment Fund 2014.4.1 © Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

We are pleased to let ARTES members know that a small visit to Artemisia Gentileschi will take place on Thursday  November 5th at 0915.

Gentileschi spent some years working in Naples (from 1630- until her death, thought to have occurred in 1652, when it was part of the Spanish Empire.) Her  patrons  included Phillip IV and his ambassadors and Viceroys, eg The Duke of Alcala. We thought it made sense to visit the exhibition and follow on developing our understanding of the Spanish in Naples. 

Due to the pandemic places are limited, to 10 only, masks must be worn and social distancing  of 2 metres observed. We cannot form groups as we go through the exhibition. 

If you want to include “Titian” please make an online booking for later that morning as  combining the two exhibitions is not now possible due to the pandemic.

Meet Susan Wilson at the Sainsbury Wing Entrance at 0900 to enter at 0915. 

Latecomers cannot be admitted. NB: If you reserve a place and cannot attend please let me know immediately as we can run a waiting list for this visit, but I would need to swap names over.

Please contact Susan Wilson at <susanruddwilson@gmail.com> asap if you wish to attend. 

Announcement: Museum and gallery re-openings in London

Colnaghi opened July 3rd, by appointment only

One of their current exhibitions, The Golden Age of Spanish Modern Art, ‘offers a re-evaluation of Spanish painting at the turn of the 20th century, presenting exquisite and innovative works by Spanish artists, particularly from Catalan, who trained in the academies of Barcelona and spent most of their working lives in Paris. Visit us this summer as we place these artists back on an equal footing with the other great European painters of their day’.

The National Gallery, opens July 8th, open daily 11am– 4pm and Friday until 9pm, advanced online booking required

Their exhibition, Titian: Love, Desire Death, which reunites for the first time since the sixteenth century Titian’s six poesie paintings commissioned in 1551 by Prince Philip of Spain, has been extended until 17 January 2021. The exhibition will no longer be traveling to the National Gallery of Scotland. Visitors will also be able to see the newly acquired painting by Sorolla, The Drunkard, Zarauz.

The Royal Academy, opens to members on July 9th and to the general public on July 16th, Thurs–Sun: 11am– 4pm, advanced online booking required

Its exhibition Picasso and Paper, has been extended until 2nd August 2020. The exhibition features more than 300 drawings, prints, collages, and sculptures by Picasso, spanning his entire career and including studies for Guernica and a 4.8-metre-wide collage.

Whitechapel Gallery, opens July 14th, Tues-Sun: 11am- 5pm, advanced online booking required

Their exhibition program has been extended through the summer, including In the Eye of Bambi: ‘La Caixa’ Collection of Contemporary Art as Selected by Verónica Gerber Bicecci, which will now remain on show until 9 August 2020. The artist and writer Verónica Gerber Bicecci (b. 1981, Mexico) explores the effects of human and environmental catastrophe on landscape and language in this free display of photography, video, and installation. More information can be found in Whitechapel Gallery’s original press release for the In the Eye of Bambi.

The National Gallery Acquires its First Painting by Joaquín Sorolla

Joaquín Sorolla, The Drunkard, Zarauz (1910), The National Gallery, London

On Tuesday, The National Gallery officially announced the acquisition of The Drunkard, Zarauz (1910) by the Spanish master Joaquín Sorolla (1863-1923). A year ago, the gallery featured the artist in the monographic exhibition Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light which was splendidly inaugurated with royal presence. The last exhibition on the artist in the United Kingdom took place at London’s Grafton Galleries in 1908 and was coordinated by the artist. Also, very few British Museums own paintings by Sorolla and these are not usually on display. This acquisition thus marks an important milestone by promoting him as one of Spain’s most renowned artists.

Known for his sunny beach scenes, this painting represents an unfamiliar period of his career anticipating the painting cycle of the regions of Spain commissioned for the Hispanic Society of America in New York (painted between 1911 and 1919). It also relates to his early career during which darker scenes of social subjects predominate. Set in the coastal town of Zarauz (Gipuzkoa), Sorolla was on a holiday with his family and, due to the bad weather, was constrained to indoor scenes including the local taverns. He was especially fascinated by the man facing him frontally, called Moscorra, who he represented on another occasion in a more pronounced inebriated state (Museo Sorolla, Madrid). Moscorra slumps forward with bloodshot eyes while another drunkard pushes another drink towards him. Sorolla masterfully captures this moment in a quick sketch with white highlights and earth-tones blurring the foreground and the background. He avoids idealisation, as portrayed in Velázquez’s Drunkards (1628-1629, Museo del Prado, Madrid), representing the issues of alcoholism in an increasingly industrialised Spain.

Documentary: ‘Titian: Behind Closed Doors’ now on BBC iPlayer

In the winter of 1550 the most famous painter in Europe came face to face with the most powerful man on earth. What emerged from this encounter between Prince Philip of Spain and the Renaissance master Titian is seen as one of the most extraordinary commissions in all of Western art history.

Given almost total creative freedom, Titian was free to explore any subject he pleased. He returned with a set of increasingly dark and explicit images about sexual pursuit, assault and violence. Known as The Poesie, these pictures are admired for their groundbreaking brushwork and innovative composition – yet they remain Titian’s most disturbing and puzzling creations.

Now, coinciding with the National Gallery’s exhibition, which brought the paintings together for the first time in 300 years, we ask why this illusive, dark and often disturbing set of paintings has come to be seen as Titian’s greatest work.

This film includes scenes showing Dr. Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery, closing the exhibition shortly after opening due to COVID-19.

First aired on 4 April 2020, the documentary is available on BBC iPlayer for the next 30 days. Click here to watch.

CANCELLED: ARTES Event: Self-Guided Tours of the National Gallery Exhibitions: Artemisia and Titian, Thursday 23 April 2020, 9:00 – 11:30 am

Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Self Portrait as Saint Catherine of Alexandria’, about 1615–17, National Gallery, London

Thursday 23 April 2020, 9:00 – 11:30 am

The National Gallery, London

You are cordially invited to self-guided tours of Artemisia and Titian. ARTES members will be able to access both exhibitions free of charge during the event (7 spaces are available).

9:00 am           

Entry via the Sainsbury Wing to the Artemisia exhibition (accessible via the Sainsbury Wing Entrance, to the far left of the main portico on Trafalgar Square, and descend to level -2). Names will be checked off a security list.

10:00 – 10:30 am

Coffee break at the National Gallery café.

10:30 – 11:30 am

Meet at the Titian exhibition entrance (via room 5) where exhibition curator Matthias Wivel will provide a brief introduction before the members’ self-guided tour.

Attendees may check their belongings into one of the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery. Please note that this event is by invitation only. Places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

We kindly ask you to RSVP to akemi.herraezvossbrink@ng-london.org.uk by Friday 17 April 2020.

Several spaces still available for the ‘Bomberg and Spain’ discussion with exhibition curator Richard Cork at the National Gallery on Tuesday 25 February, 10:05 to 11 am [RSVP by Friday 21st]

You are cordially invited to an informal study morning in the exhibition Young Bomberg and the Old Masters (27 November 2019 – 1 March 2020)

David Bomberg
Study for ‘Sappers at Work: A Canadian Tunnelling Company, Hill 60, St Eloi’, about 1918–9
Oil on canvas
304.2 × 243.8 cm
Tate, London (T00319)
Purchased 1959
© Tate

10:05 am            

Meet at the exhibition in Gallery 1 (accessible via the Getty Entrance to the right of the main portico on Trafalgar Square).

Self-led tour of the exhibition and discussion (coordinated by National Gallery Spanish Paintings Curatorial Fellow Akemi Herráez). The discussion will take place during normal museum opening hours so please be mindful of other visitors.

10:30 – 11:00 am

Followed by curator Richard Cork’s overview of the exhibition and further discussion with a presentation including Bomberg’s paintings of Spain in the Wilkins Boardroom, Wilkins Building (Akemi Herráez will take the group from the exhibition to the conference room).

Attendees may check their belongings into one of the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery. There is a bench in the exhibition for those who wish to sit. Please note that this study morning is by invitation only. Numbers are strictly limited to a quota of 13 people and places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

We kindly ask you to RSVP to akemi.herraezvossbrink@ng-london.org.uk by Friday 21 February 2020.

ARTES Members’ Event: Discussion on Bomberg and Spain, The National Gallery, London, 25 February 2020, 10:05–11:00am (RSVP by 21 February)

You are cordially invited to an informal study morning in the exhibition Young Bomberg and the Old Masters (27 November 2019 – 1 March 2020)

David Bomberg
Study for ‘Sappers at Work: A Canadian Tunnelling Company, Hill 60, St Eloi’, about 1918–9
Oil on canvas
304.2 × 243.8 cm
Tate, London (T00319)
Purchased 1959
© Tate

10:05 am            

Meet at the exhibition in Gallery 1 (accessible via the Getty Entrance to the right of the main portico on Trafalgar Square).

Self-led tour of the exhibition and discussion (coordinated by National Gallery Spanish Paintings Curatorial Fellow Akemi Herráez). The discussion will take place during normal museum opening hours so please be mindful of other visitors.

10:30 – 11:00 am

Followed by curator Richard Cork’s overview of the exhibition and further discussion with a presentation including Bomberg’s paintings of Spain in the Wilkins Boardroom, Wilkins Building (Akemi Herráez will take the group from the exhibition to the conference room).

Attendees may check their belongings into one of the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery. There is a bench in the exhibition for those who wish to sit. Please note that this study morning is by invitation only. Numbers are strictly limited to a quota of 13 people and places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

We kindly ask you to RSVP to akemi.herraezvossbrink@ng-london.org.uk by Friday 21 February 2020.