Tag Archives: National Gallery London

News: the National Gallery acquires a still life by Juan de Zurbarán

n-6669_432pxThe National Gallery, London, has recently acquired Still Life with Lemons, Lilies, Carnations, Roses and a Lemon Blossom in a Wicker Basket, the first work by Juan de Zurbarán to enter a public collection in the UK. On display at the Gallery since 25 April 2018, the work was painted in about 1643–49 by the son of leading Golden Age artist Francisco de Zurbarán. Long overshadowed by his father, Juan was a skilled still life painter documented in Seville between 1620 and 1649. Works by his hand are extremely rare as his career was cut short at 29 by the plague which halved the city’s population.

 

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CONFERENCE – Michelangelo & Sebastiano – The National Gallery London – 23 & 24 June 2017

Book Launch – Sebastiano del Piombo & the World of Spanish Rome by Piers Baker-Bates

ARTES Committee Member Dr Piers Baker-Bates has published an examination of Sebastiano’s career as a transcultural artist through an analysis of his Spanish patrons in Rome.

This book will prove to be an important tool to the greater appreciation of the artist in advance of the National Gallery London’s forthcoming exhibition Michelangelo & Sebastiano (see link) curated by Matthias Wivel, from 15 March – 26 June 2017.

A discount is available to those ARTES members who would like to buy a copy. Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com for details.

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Upcoming Exhibition: Maíno in London

2016-08-MainoMaíno’s Adorations. Heaven on Earth

National Gallery, London
28 September 2016 – 29 January 2017

For the duration of the National Gallery’s Beyond Caravaggio exhibition the Museo Nacional del Prado has lent the National Gallery two of its masterpieces by Fray Juan Bautista Maíno (1581-1649) for a display in Room 1. Both paintings — The Adoration of the Shepherds and The Adoration of the Kings — were painted between 1612 and 1614, after the artist’s return from Italy, as part of the high altar of the Dominican church of San Pedro Martír in Toledo. Not only do they display Maíno’s Caravaggesque naturalism, which he had seen at first hand in Rome, but they also combine that with the classicising style of Anibale Caracci and Guido Reni, both of whom Maíno new personally.