Tag Archives: Renaissance

Opens Today: Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain, NGA, Washington DC, until 17 February 2020

Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain will be the first major exhibition held outside Spain to celebrate the expressive art of the most important sculptor active on the Iberian Peninsula during the first half of the 16th century, Alonso Berruguete. The exhibition will present an impressive range of more than 40 works from across his career, including examples of his earliest paintings from his time in Italy, where he trained. His abilities as draftsman will also be celebrated with the largest group of his drawings ever to be assembled. The primary focus will be on his painted sculptures in wood, which generally decorated large altarpieces, or retablos. The Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid, Spain, will be lending a substantial group of some of his very best figures. A section of one of his altarpieces will be loosely reconstructed in the exhibition to convey an idea of how his sculptures were originally seen.

The exhibition is curated by C. D. Dickerson III, curator and head of sculpture and decorative arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

A fully illustrated catalog accompanying the exhibition will be the first general book on Berruguete published in English and will feature essays by Dickerson as well as Manuel Arias Martínez, deputy director, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid, and Mark McDonald, curator of Italian, Spanish, Mexican, and early French prints and illustrated books, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas.

It will travel to the Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, from March 29 to July 26, 2020.

Click here for more information.

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New Publication: Carmen Fracchia, ‘”Black but Human” Slavery and Visual Arts in Hapsburg Spain, 1480–1700’ (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2019)

In ‘Black but Human’ Carmen Fracchia, Reader in Hispanic Art History at Birkbeck, explores the emergence of the slave and freed slave subjects in the visual form of Imperial Spain. The book considers the links between visual regimes and early modern Spanish discourses on slavery and human diversity that are the historic roots of contemporary racism in the Hispanic world.

‘Black but Human’ is the first study to focus on the visual representations of African slaves and ex-slaves in Spain during the Hapsburg dynasty. The Afro-Hispanic proverb ‘Black but Human’ is the main thread of the six chapters and serves as a lens through which to explore how a certain visual representation of slavery both embodies and reproduces hegemonic visions of enslaved and liberated Africans, and at the same time provides material for critical and emancipatory practices by Afro-Hispanics themselves.

The African presence in the Iberian Peninsula between the late fifteenth century and the end of the seventeenth century was as a result of the institutionalization of the local and transatlantic slave trades. In addition to the Moors, Berbers and Turks born as slaves, there were approximately two million enslaved people in the kingdoms of Castile, Aragón and Portugal. The ‘Black but Human’ topos that emerges from the African work songs and poems written by Afro-Hispanics encodes the multi-layered processes through which a black emancipatory subject emerges and a ‘black nation’ forges a collective resistance. It is visually articulated by Afro-Hispanic and Spanish artists in religious paintings and in the genres of self-portraiture and portraiture. This extraordinary imagery coexists with the stereotypical representations of African slaves and ex-slaves by Spanish sculptors, engravers, jewellers, and painters mainly in the religious visual form and by European draftsmen and miniaturists, in their landscape drawings and sketches for costume books.

Click here for more information and to pre-order this book

New Exhibition and CEEH Publication: VALENTÍN CARDERERA Y SOLANO, Biblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid, September 27, 2019 – January 12, 2020

VALENTÍN CARDERERA Y SOLANO (Huesca, 1796 – Madrid, 1880) was a painter, scholar, communicator, collector and traveller. His life was marked by his efforts to safeguard Spain’s historical heritage and he journeyed around much of the Spanish mainland to bear witness in his drawings and watercolours to significant monuments, many at risk of disappearance as a result of the modernising drive ushered in by the new liberal order. Member of the Romantic generation and friends with the Madrazo family, Carderera was also in contact with some other figures like Richard Ford and Prosper Mérimée, with whom he shared the same nostalgia for the past and the need to define his position in the complex debate between tradition and progress.

The exhibition—featuring more than a hundred pieces including paintings, drawings, engravings, manuscripts, books, maps and objects—pays tribute to Carderera’s work and the significant legacy he left in the Biblioteca Nacional de España. In 1867 the Spanish State adquired his collection of drawings and prints: more than 45.000 pieces which enriched the department of Fine Arts with engravings of Mantegna, Dürer and Rembrandt, among others, along with one of the very few drawings attributed to Velázquez. Click here for more information.

The exhibition opens on 27 September in the Biblioteca Nacional de España’s Sala Hipóstila. It was curated by José María Lanzarote Guiral and organised by the Biblioteca Nacional de España and Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica.

It is accompanied by a an exhibition catalogue which reconstructs Carderera’s intense life in six thematic sections, published by CEEH. Until 25 September, the catalogue can be purchased from the CEEH website at special discount price. Click here for more information.

Lunchtime talk: Tobias Capwell, ‘Bermejo and the armour of an archangel’, Sainsbury Wing lecture theatre, National Gallery, London, 24 June 2019, 1–1.45 pm

Bartolomé Bermejo, ‘Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil’ (detail), 1468 © The National Gallery, London

What is conveyed by the armour in Bermejo’s Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil?

In this talk, Tobias Capwell reveals how Renaissance artists used the rich imagery of arms and armour to communicate messages about power and faith.

Tobias Capwell is Curator of Arms and Armour at the Wallace Collection in London, Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, and an internationally acknowledged expert on Medieval and Renaissance weapons.

Please click here for more information.

‘Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance’ Study Morning, Thursday 27 June 2019, 9:00 am, The National Gallery, London

ARTES members are cordially invited to an informal study morning in the exhibition Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance, which will open on 12 June at the National Gallery, London (until 29 September 2019).

Programme (27 June 2019)

9:00 am: Meet at The National Gallery’s West Entrance (Staff Entrance to the left of the main portico on Trafalgar Square)

9:15 am: Welcome, curator’s introduction and discussion in the exhibition (led by Letizia Treves)

11:00–11:20 am: Complimentary tea and coffee in the Former Viewing Room, Wilkins Building

11:20–11:30 am: Brief overview of the exhibition Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light (Akemi Herráez) in the Former Viewing Room

11:30 am: Self-guided tour (complimentary tickets will be provided) of Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light (Sainsbury Wing, Level -2)

Attendees may leave their belongings at the West Entrance on arrival. After 11.30 am these must be checked into the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery.

Please note that this study morning is by invitation only. Numbers are strictly limited and places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. We kindly ask you to RSVP to colloquia.RSVP@ng-london.org.uk by Thursday 6 June 2019.

CFP: Sacred Images in the Iberian Americas until 1700: Processes, Strategies and Agents, Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March 2019

1024px-our_lady_of_guadalupeSACRED IMAGES IN THE IBERIAN AMERICAS UNTIL 1700: PROCESSES, STRATEGIES AND AGENTS

This panel proposes an approach to the phenomenon of sacred images through three main elements: processes, strategies and agents. The mark of the sacred and the miraculous was achieved by different procedures: hierophanies, thaumaturgy, paranormal phenomena (sweating, weeping, mobility). Definitely, the agency of the sculpture or the painting of religious images blossomed in the Iberian Americas, in need of tradition and sacralization.
Texts about the inventio, the hierophany and other manifestations of the image relate the processes of creation and the evolution of these images until marked by the sacred. In most cases, they follow patterns, repeated to the point of being able to establish a rhetoric of the sacred image. In many cases, these stories, regardless of their historical veracity, provide us valuable information about the strategies devised by the agents. Empowered by their sacred image, these agents (religious orders, patrons…) are in a position to get economic benefits (charity, exemptions), political ones (preferential treatment), and they can build an identity at various levels (territorial, ethnic, political…). The huge amount of textual and visual sources allows to deal with case studies in order to understand the crucial role of the image, through the sacred, in the Ibero-American space of this time.
We invite submissions of proposals for 20 minutes presentations that explore case-studies or some of the many aforementioned aspects of sacred images in the Iberian Americas (also Iberian Asia can be considered) between 16th and 17th century.
Please submit abstracts (200 words maximum), along with a title and a CV (300 word maximum including full name, current affiliation and email address) to Escardiel González (escardielge@gmail.com) and Daniel Expósito Sánchez (daniel.exposito@upr.edu) by August 10, 2018.

More information in: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696697/Art-History-CfPs-for-RSA-2019-Toronto

Featured Exhibition: Michel Sittow. Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe, until 16 September at The Kumu Museum, Tallinn

michel_sittow_002

Born in Tallinn, Michel Sittow, studied in the studio of his father Clawes van der Sittow, a respected painter and wood carver. In 1484, the young artist headed to Bruges, the art centre of the Netherlands at the time, probably to work in the studio of Hans Memling, a German who was the town’s most sought-after master. There he learned the illusionist technique typical of the Netherlandish school of painting.

From 1492 to 1504, Michel Sittow was in the service of Isabella of Castile, and later worked as a portraitist for Philip the Handsome, Margaret of Austria, Ferdinand of Aragon and Christian II of Denmark. Sittow returned to his home-town of Tallinn, first in 1506 in connection with an inheritance dispute, when he joined the local artists’ guild. In 1514, Sittow left for Copenhagen at the invitation of King Christian II, and from there he went on to Spain and the Netherlands. The famous portraitist returned to Tallinn for good in early 1518.
With his diverse heritage (a family with German and Finnish-Swedish roots living in Tallinn) and cosmopolitan career, Sittow did not fit in with the national narrative of art history that prevailed in the first half of the 20th century. However, his cosmopolitan career is all the more relevant in the current European context.

The international exhibition project, which includes multi-faceted collaboration with centres in Europe and the United States, brings Sittow’s extraordinary works from distinguished museums and private collection to his first solo exhibition. This is a unique platform for a broader introduction and further research on the oeuvre of this remarkable artist. Most of Sittow’s small number of works (20 to 25 paintings) are on exhibit, thereby providing an excellent survey of his work as a portraitist and painter of religious works. It also allows us to view his art in a broader context, including in collaboration with Juan de Flandes and other contemporary Netherlandish artists. In addition to the paintings, another section of the exhibition is comprised of a timeline that provides an overview of the 500-year story of Michel Sittow, from his birth and successful career to his fall into oblivion and rediscovery.

The exhibition, which is a collaborative project of the Art Museum of Estonia and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will take place in 2018 in celebration of the centenary of the Republic of Estonia. This year also marks 500 years since Michel Sittow’s final return to his home-town of Tallinn.

Click here for more details.