Tag Archives: Conference

CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019, deadline 31 March!

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The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.

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CFP: ‘Imperial Entanglements: Trans-Oceanic Basque Networks in British and Spanish Colonialism and their Legacy’, Museum of Liverpool, Liverpool UK, 9–10 August 2019

Port-cities in Britain are known and studied as crossroads and gateways of empire. People, ideas, goods, money, etc. flowed in and out of these porous urban environments. For many people, port-cities were not only a place of transience, they could also be a home city with a strong sense of community. From the 16th through the 19th centuries, some of those who called port-cities their homes were part of the Anglo-Spanish diaspora. From Cadiz to London or Bilbao to Liverpool, Spanish and British citizens crossed the oceans in order to participate in Anglo-Spanish trade and imperial expansion. These voyages inevitably led to the creation of Anglo-Spanish communities in the littoral regions of both empires. The growth and success of Anglo-Spanish communities in port-cities was driven in part by imperial ventures such as the textile industry, mining, and the slave trade. It is not always easy to reconcile the history of exploitative ventures with the immigrant communities whose creation they facilitated. However, it is important to bring together local and imperial histories in order to understand how Anglo-Spanish communities were built, thrived, and sometimes waned.

This conference seeks to bring together scholars interested in the lives of Anglo-Spanish communities across both the Spanish and British empires. The conference also seeks to address the tensions that investigating family and local history can bring to communities today. The conference will be open to the public in the hopes that those interested in the conference themes will come and engage with the ideas being presented. The themes of this conference were inspired by the histories of two Anglo-Basque families, the Zuluetas and the Larrinagas, both of whom have contentious legacies in London and Liverpool.

The organisers are particularly interested in paper or panel proposals in the areas of family history; literature; art history; business history; food history; urban history; slave-trade history; shipping history; and cultural history. Please click here for more information. Please send individual paper or panel proposals to Dr. Anna Brinkman (a.brinkman@warwick.ac.uk) by midnight on 25 March.

CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019 

CANONS AND REPERTOIRES: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019 

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.

Updated Programme: COLLECTING SPAIN: SPANISH DECORATIVE ARTS IN BRITAIN AND SPAIN, Hochhauser Auditorium, Victoria and Albert Museum, 8 and 9 June 2018

V&ACoordinators: Ana Cabrera and Lesley Miller

This conference explores collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain from the 19thcentury onwards, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies aredrawnfrom the British and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organisedin joint sessions dealing with the same subject from British and then Spanish perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference includes poster sessions during the coffee breaks.

Click here to buy tickets

Programme

Friday, 8thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish Decorative Arts

10.00             Registration and collecting of conference packs; displaying of posters

10.20            Introduction

Ana Cabrera, V&A

10:30       Collecting, Display & Dissemination: The Changing Face of the Decorative Arts Collection at South Kensington, 1852-1873

Susanna Avery-Quash, National Gallery, London

Lustreware and Furniture

Chair: Holly Trusted, V&A

11.00             Collecting Spanish Lustreware at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Mariam Rosser-Owen, Asian Department, V&A

11:30            A Survey and History of the Collecting of Spanish Decorative Arts: Lustreware

Jaume Coll, Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia

12.00-12.30.     COFFEE BREAK

12:30      Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

Nick Humphrey, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A

13:00             Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid, 1880-1920

Sofía Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

13.30-14.30       LUNCH

Textiles and Fashion

Chair: Sonnet Stanfill, V&A

14:30             Following the Thread: Collecting Spanish Textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Ana Cabrera, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A

15:30             Textile Collecting in Catalonia

Silvia Carbonell, Centre de Documentació i Museu Tèxtil, Terrasa

16:00            Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Oriole Cullen, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

16:30             From Dress to Fashion: The Collection of The Museo del Traje

Helena López del Hierro, Museo del Traje, Madrid

16.30-17.00       TEA BREAK

Sculpture and Plaster Casts

Chair: Edward Payne, Auckland Castle Project

17.00             A Vogue for St Francis

Xavier Bray, Wallace Collection, London

17:30       Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the Profile of Spanish Art through Plaster Casts

Holly Trusted, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

18:00       Electrical Treasuries: The Decorative Arts Collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones, 1881-1915

María Bolaños, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

18.30-19.00       DISCUSSION

Saturday, 9thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish decorative arts continued

Silver

Chair: Antonia Boström, V&A

10:15       The Scholar, the Scoundrel and the Skater: How the V&A Collections of Hispanic Silver were formed

Kirstin Kennedy, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

10:45             Collecting Spanish Silver

Jesús Rivas, Universidad de Murcia

11.15-11.45COFFEE BREAK

Displaying, Interpreting and Conserving Spanish Decorative Arts

Chair: Christopher Wilk, V&A

11.45            Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative Analysis

Isabel Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

12.15             Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries at the V&A

Lesley Miller, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

12.45             The20th-century Galleries at the V&A

Corinna Gardner and Johanna Agerman Ross, Design, Architecture and Digital Department, V&A

13.15-14.15LUNCH

Displaying, Interpreting and conserving Spanish decorative arts

Chair: Joanna Norman, V&A

14.15             The Conservationof the Cast Courts. New Discoveries from Spanish Casts

Victor Borges, Conservation Department, V&A

14:45             Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland

Edward Payne, The Auckland Project

15.15             Closing remarks

Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Miguel González Suela, Directorate of the State Museum, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports

Call for Papers: Iberian (In)tolerance (8 November: London)

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Paper proposals are being accepted for “Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges, and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era,” an LAHP Funded Postgraduate Students-led Conference to be held at Senate House, Bedford Room 37, University College, London.

Keynotes speakers include Prof. Trevor Dadson (Queen Mary University) and Prof. Alexander Samson (UCL)
Submission deadline: 20 June 2018

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.
We invite proposals for papers in English (15-20 minutes) that explore the relationships among Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the 17th century and how these relationships changed over time, as represented in literary works that mirrored and were influenced by the particular socio-political dynamics of the period.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• Literature and minorities: Conversos, New Christians, MarranosMoriscos.
• Literature and tolerance, convivencia
, cultural exchanges.
• Literature and legality: statutes of limpieza de sangre (blood purity), blood libel, Pardons of 1609 and 1627, Duke of Lerma, Duke of Olivares.
• Literature beyond the Iberian Peninsula, Spanish identity in France, the Netherlands, Portugal, etc.

Send your proposal here

Candidates will be notified by the 15th of July 2018.
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us here: iberianintolerance@gmail.com.

Organisers:
• Roser López Cruz (King’s College London)
• Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Call for Posters: Collecting Spain: Spanish Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain, V&A, London, 8th and 9th June 2018

 

V&ACall for posters

On 8th and 9th June 2018, the Victoria and Albert Museum is hosting a conference with the aim of studying the collecting history and practices in the Spanish Decorative Arts in Britain and in Spain, from 1850 to the mid-20th century. Research on collectors, art dealers, type of collections, and the development of the Decorative Arts museums in Britain and Spain is the focus of discussion at the conference. The speakers are scholars from English and Spanish museum and universities who will present papers on the collecting of different material from Iberia, such as ceramics, furniture, metalwork, sculpture and casts textiles and fashion, as well as on displaying, conserving and interpreting these artworks.

Call for Posters

This call for poster presentations invites the participation of students studying for Masters or PhD and young researchers who would like to present a poster dealing with one of the Conference topics.

The proposal should be provided in the form of an abstract of 400 words, accompanied by a short CV (an A4 page). It should outline the aims and objectives of the research, the methods, and findings to date. All posters will be peer-reviewed. The poster format will A0

Contact

If you have any questions, feel free to contact us. All correspondence, including your proposals for papers or posters and your CV as well as further questions, should be addressed to a.cabrera@vam.ac.uk and tao.chang@vam.ac.uk

Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.