Tag Archives: Conference

Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.

New Publication: Santa Teresa o la llama permanente. Estudios históricos, artísticos y literario (Madrid, 2017)

santa_teresa_portada-1-300x439Esther Borrego Gutiérrez and Jaime Olmedo Ramos eds., Santa Teresa o la llama permanente. Estudios históricos, artísticos y literarios (Madrid: Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica, 2017).
424 pp, 56 illus. colour and b&w.
Paperback € 33,66 (without IVA).
ISBN 9788415245711
Twenty essays from the proceedings of the International Congress on Saint Teresa of Avila, held in 2015 at the Universidad Complutense in Madrid. Essays include ones relating to artists associated with the saint and to the vision of women in Teresian literature, and a bibliographical appendix of all the principal works on Teresian literature from her own to the present day.

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 2018)

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Diego Rivera, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, 1931, SFAI, San Francisco

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 18)

Deadline: 7 August 2017

The Art History of Latin America has been written, for the most part,  in the 20th and 21st century.  As a discipline it is the product of two distinct points of view: the individual countries’ national art histories and visions generated from other regions, which privilege supra-national conceptions of geography and identity. Be they the Hispanic art histories of the 1930s, the North American passion for Mexican muralism of the 1930s, the European interests in alternative forms of Baroque in the post Second World War period, or the high modernist interpretations of modern art in Latin America during the post-War period, the discipline of art history has been shaped by scholarship generated outside the region, as much as from the scholarship generated within it. In this panel we invite scholars to study the effects of a globalized perspective on Latin American Art History, specifically by analyzing the contributions of other regions to the understanding of the concept of Latin American art.  We welcome papers studying any of the topics above, as well as the recent histories that stress critical notions such as race, gender and class to create new readings of Latin American Art History.

To submit a paper proposal, please send a 100-200 word abstract and a c.v. to Michele Greet (mgreet@gmu.edu) and Mercedes Trelles (MERCEDESTRELLES@AOL.COM) by August 7, 2017. Submissions for session proposals are due to LASA by Sept. 7. We will inform you of your acceptance prior to that date so that papers that cannot be included in the panel may be submitted individually.

CFP: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present

1923933798International Conference: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal, 27 and 28 November 2017
Deadline for paper proposals: 15 July

The project “Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations
and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present” emerges from the
collaboration of three research groups engaged in the development of
transnational perspectives in contemporary art history and curating and
in the study of relations between artistic production and migratory
processes – with a particular focus on Latin America and Southern
Europe. More specifically, the organization of this project involves:
the group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art” associated
to the research line Contemporary Art Studies at IHA/FCSH-UNL, the
group “Art in a Global Perspective” at CIEBA / FBAUL and the research
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P),
at the University of Barcelona.

Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic
transits from the 1960s to the present – inscribed in the program of
Lisbon 2017 Ibero-American Capital of Culture – aims at opening a
critical space of debate by engaging art historians, curators and
artists of different generations and nationalities to discuss the role
of different forms of dislocation – such as artistic migrations,
exiles, networking, circulations of ideas and theoretical
articulations, artworks and exhibitions – in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America. In this sense, the very
diverse and heterogeneous set of geographical and cultural areas
incorporated by the term “Latin America” are envisioned here as
specific and at the same time as territories strongly connected with
other locations through a complex network of itineraries, circulations,
appropriations and translations. In this network, different historical,
political and economic processes – among them, colonization and
decolonization – play significant roles. This project seeks to explore
the tensions and interrelations between local inscription and
connectivity, habitation and circulation, present enunciation and
revisiting the past.

Two different actions articulate the project Through, From, To Latin
America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to
the present: an international conference and a set of workshops in the
field of curating, artistic practice and art history. In fact, it aims
to offer different possibilities and forms of engagement to the
participants.

Call for papers
The group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art”
(Contemporary Art Studies – IHA/FCSH-UNL), the group “Arte numa
perspectiva global/Art in a global perspective” (CIEBA/FBAUL) and the
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P)
(University of Barcelona), together with the Program of Lisbon 2017
Ibero-American Capital of Culture, welcome communication proposals from
art historians, curators, art critics and artists for the international
conference Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and
artistic transits from the 1960s to the present (Lisbon, Auditorium of
Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa,
27 and 28 November 2017).
Proposals for communications can address, but are not limited to, the
following topics:
– The role of different forms of dislocation in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America;
– Interrelations between local inscription and connectivity, habitation
and circulation, present enunciation and revisiting the past;
– Analysis of artistic and curatorial projects that relate to the
questions proposed;
– Exploration of South-South transits and circulations between Latin
America, Southern Europe, Africa and Asia;
– Interconnections between artistic networks and social and political
movements since the Cold War;
– Analysis of how artistic and cultural networks interfered with (or
participated in) the geopolitics of Cold War and globalization.

Submissions
This two-days conference invites proposals of up to 400 words for
communications of 20 minutes. Please also include a brief biographical
note (150 words), institutional affiliation (or independent) and your
contact information. All documents sent should be in word or pdf format.
We can only accept one proposal for each applicant.

Proposals should be emailed by the 15th of July 2017 to the following
e-mail address:
americalatinaconferencia2017@gmail.com
The languages of the conference are Spanish, Portuguese and English.

Applicants will be notified of the results of the selection by late
July / early August 2017.

An edited volume with selected papers presented at the conference will
be proposed for publication.

For more in formation please check the website:
http://americalatinaconferenciainternacional2017.weebly.com

Conference: Visual culture and women’s political identity in the early modern Iberian world II

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Diego Velázquez, Queen Isabel of Bourbon, 1634-35, Oil on canvas, 301 x 314 cm, Museo del Prado, Madrid. Source: Web Gallery of Art

Conference: Visual culture and women’s political identity in the early modern Iberian world II, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies at the University of Nottingham, 21-22 September 2017


Following the opening conference devoted to this theme, held at CHAM, in November 2016, this second conference brings together an international group of researchers from a range of scholarly perspectives to explore, discuss and debate a series of case studies on the visual construction and projection of women’s political identity in medieval and early modern Spain and Portugal. The papers explore a number of critical perspectives that range from the portrayal of Queens and their household to the discourse on female piety and spirituality, both in the court and beyond to lower social strata. The role of women’s agency within the structures of patriarchal society and discourse that underscored much of visual culture is addressed in a number of insightful ways. Furthermore, the range of papers engages with prescient methodological issues facing the study of the visual dimensions of female political identity.

In addition this conference is pleased to announce a plenary lecture by Juliet Perkins, King’s College London.

Programme
Thursday 21st September

9:15 Welcome
9:30-11:00 Session 1) Iconographies of authority 
Chair: Jean Andrews
María Morrás, Departament d’Humanitats, Universitat Pompeu Fabra
La iconografía mariana en la Corona de Aragón y la orden de la Jarra

Inmaculada Rodríguez Moya, Universitat Jaume I
Reinas Fuertes: Poder, Religión Y Familia En La Representación De Las Mujeres Habsburgo

11:00-11:30 Coffee

11:30 – 1:00 Session 2) Religious identity in word and image
Chair: Jeremy Roe

Jean Andrews, University of Nottingham
Josefa in Óbidos: painting under the sign of Luisa de Guzmán 

Joana Serrado, University of Oxford
Six characters in search of a Canon: Saintliness as Feminist Subjectivity in the Early Modern Portuguese Empire

Lunch 1:00-2:00

2:00 – 4:00 Session 3) Iberian Queens and their courts
Chair: Carla Alferes Pinto, Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Laura Oliván, Universidad de Granada
Dresses, Portraits and Spaces: Female Identities at the Alcázar (1621-1665)

Mercedes Llorente, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
The portrayal of two Iberian Queens: Luisa Gusmão and Mariana of Austria

Susana Varela Flor, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Catherine of Braganza: the iconographic strategies of a Catholic Queen in a Protestant Kingdom (1662-1693)

4:00-4:30 Tea

4:30 Plenary Lecture

Juliet Perkins, King’s College London
Guilherme Debrie’s engravings for Theatro Comico Portuguez

Friday 22nd September

9:30-11:00 Session 4) The Queen’s household
Chair: Jeremy Lawrance

Vanessa de Cruz Medina, Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Objects and Agency: Visual Culture and the Political Identity of Ladies-in-Waiting to the Habsburg Courts

Jeremy Roe, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Luisa de Gusmão and the staging of political identity 

11:00- 11:30 Coffee

11:30-1:00 Session 5) Discussion
Concluding address: Jeremy Lawrance, University of Nottingham
Roundtable discussion

For enquiries please contact Jeremy Roe, jeremy.roe@fcsh.unl.pt

Call for Papers: Spain and Orientalism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries – Association of Art Historians conference (Edinburgh, 7-9 April 2016)

Jones - AlhambraSpain represents a unique and fertile context in which to explore attitudes to the art and culture of the Islamic world. Spain was routinely ‘orientalised’ by northern European cultures in the 19th century, as foreign visitors indulged in oriental reveries when reflecting on Spain’s Islamic past (711–1492) and admiring its ‘Moorish’ remains at the Alhambra palace in Granada, the mosque/cathedral in Cordoba, or the Giralda in Seville. For the Spaniard, however, this Islamic heritage raised potentially disorientating questions about cultural roots and national identity. Spanish attitudes to the Islamic past were further complicated by Spain’s ambivalent relations with the Islamic present in Morocco, ranging from war and conflict (1859–60) to Franco’s recruitment of Moroccans at the start of the Spanish Civil War.

This session builds on recent research by historians of art, literature and culture, whose work has revealed that the European discourse on the Islamic world is much more polyphonic than traditional postcolonial theory assumed. The session invites papers that examine 19th- and 20-century visual responses to Spain’s Islamic past and Spain’s nearest ‘Orient’, Morocco, by both Spanish and non-Spanish artists across all media (architecture, fine art, illustrated books, photography, film, fashion etc.). How did artists translate Spain’s Islamic world into visual formats? How was such imagery produced, viewed, and marketed? What were the artistic, ideological, political, and social positions on which visual responses were grounded? How important were they in the formation of broader attitudes to the Islamic world?

Email proposals for papers to the convenors Claudia Hopkins and Anna McSweeney by 9 November 2015. You can download a paper proposal form at http://www.aah.org.uk/annual-conference/sessions2016/session21