Tag Archives: influence

CFP: Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art and Artists of Late Medieval and Renaissance Iberia and Beyond, c. 1400–1550, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28–29 May 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline – Friday 10 January 2020

Anonymous Portuguese cartographer, Cantino Planisphere (detail), ca. 1502. Map on parchment, 220 x 105 cm. Biblioteca Estense Universitaria, Modena, Italy. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Travelling Objects, Travelling People aims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France and the Low Countries, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference will reconsider the dynamics of artistic influence in late medieval Iberia, and place European exchanges in a global context, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, it seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and issues of migration and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.

The theme of ‘travellers’—artists who reached or departed the region, at times more than once in their lives, but also objects and concepts imported and exported—will expand and inflect traditional narratives of late medieval and Renaissance art, underscoring the complexity of global interactions and exchanges which connected the Iberian peninsula to Europe and beyond. Bringing together international scholars working on Iberia and a range of related geographies, the conference seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to expand the field of analysis beyond Europe to encompass relationships with newly acquired dominions, from Madeira to Santo Domingo.

Topics for papers may include, but are not limited to:

  • Iberian artists employed abroad, from the master mason Guillelm Sagrera in Naples, to the sculptor Juan de la Huerta at the Chartreuse de Champmol
  • The close imitation of northern artists in such works as the Portuguese copies of Quentin Metsys’s The Angel Appearing to Saints Clara, Colette and Agnes (early 16th century, Museu de Setúbal / Convento de Jesus, Portugal)
  • ‘Iberian’ objects produced elsewhere, for example Christian ivory carvings made in Goa or Kongo, Afro-Portuguese spoons, and Mexican ‘feather-work’ adopting the vocabulary of northern European late Gothic painting
  • Works made for a non-Iberian audience but purchased and displayed by local patrons.

By encouraging conversations across such seemingly disparate topics and geographies, the conference aims to position the Iberian artistic landscape within the networks of artistic exchange that spanned the medieval and Renaissance worlds, challenging the significance of 1492 as a moment of rupture between the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods.

Proposals are welcome from postgraduate, early-career and established researchers working in all relevant disciplines. Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words together with a short CV and 100-word biography to Costanza.Beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and Sylvia.Alvares-Correa@history.ox.ac.uk by Friday 10 January 2020.

Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Successful candidates will be notified by 17 February. In the first instance, applicants are encouraged to apply to their home institution for travel and accommodation funding. The organisers hope to provide financial support for travel and accommodation to speakers who require it. This conference is made possible by the kind generosity of Sam Fogg.

Please click here for more information.

Closing Soon: Balenciaga and Spanish Painting, Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, until 22 September 2019

Francisco de Zurbarán
Saint Casilda, ca. 1635
Oil on canvas. 171 x 107 cm
© Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

The Spanish fashion designer’s approach to his designs was informed by his lifelong love of art sparked by his youthful admiration of the paintings owned by clients of his seamstress mother, in particular the Marquis and Marchioness of Casa Torres, who spent their summers in the Palacio Aldamar (also known as Vista Ona) in Getaría. Three of the paintings on display in this exhibition, and loaned by the Prado, were in that collection: Head of an Apostle by Velázquez; Saint Sebastian by El Greco; and Cardinal Luis María de Borbón y Vallabriga by Goya. The latter establishes a dialogue with a magnificent red dress suit with a short jacket loaned from the Museo del Traje in Madrid. Balenciaga frequently drew on the heritage of his Spanish homeland, going further than adding flamenco ruffles to his dresses and seeking inspiration by re-imagining bull fighters’ jackets. The exhibition explores the influence of four centuries of Spanish painting on the couturier’s work. Zurbarán was one inspiration, his drapery influencing Balenciaga’s bold sashes. In 1939 Velázquez’s portraits of the Infanta Magarita were reinterpreted by the dress designer’s work. Also notable is the interaction between a spectacular blue silk evening gown and cape and the mantle of the same colour seen in The Immaculate Conception by Murillo from the Arango collection. The curator Eloy Martínez de la Pera, has drawn together some 90 examples of Balenciaga’s work alongside 55 paintings, including works by El Greco, Murillo, Goya and the nineteenth-century artist Antonio María Esquivel. Paintings have been lent by the Prado, Bilbao, Seville and Valencia and costumes, some of which have never been displayed before and designs have been lent by the Balenciaga Museum in his hometown in Getaría, and archives in Paris. The exhibition also explores the impact of Philip II’s court making the use of black fashionable for clothing throughout Europe, and how Balenciaga chose to transform it in his own way. As the magazine Harper’s Bazaar wrote in 1938: “at the new Spanish house Balenciaga [in Paris] the black is so black that it hits you like a blow. Thick Spanish black, almost velvety, a night without stars, which makes the ordinary black seem almost grey.”

Click here for more information.

Opens Today: Balenciaga and Spanish Painting, Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, until 22 September 2019

Francisco de Zurbarán
Saint Casilda, ca. 1635
Oil on canvas. 171 x 107 cm
© Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

In the summer of 2019 the museum is presenting an exhibition that connects the work of Cristóbal Balenciaga, the most admired and influential fashion designer of all time, with the tradition of 16th– to 20th-century Spanish painting.

References to Spanish art and culture are a recurring presence in Balenciaga’s work. The simple, minimalist lines of religious habits or the architectural volume of their cloth are to be found in many of his designs. The billowing train of a flamenco dancer’s dress echoed in the flounces on some dresses, the glinting reflections on a bullfighter’s suit, brilliantly conveyed in the sequin embroidery on a bolero jacket, and the aesthetic of Habsburg court dress echoed in black velvets embellished with jet trim in some creations are just a few examples. Balenciaga constantly studied the history of art and made use of these influences, expressed through his own powerful and unique style, throughout his career, including his most avant-garde period, reviving historic garments and reinterpreting them in a strikingly modern manner.

The exhibition, curated by Eloy Martínez de la Pera, will include a carefully-selected group of paintings loaned from private Spanish collections and public museums, including the Museo Nacional del Prado and the museums of Fine Arts of Seville, Valencia and Bilbao. They will be accompanied by a group of important creations by Balenciaga, some of them never previously exhibited, loaned from national and international museums including the Museo Balenciaga in Guetaria, the Museo del Traje in Madrid and other international institutions and private collections.

Click here for more information.

New Publication: El Greco comes to America: the Discovery of a Modern Old Master (CEEH, Center for Spain in America and Frick Collection, 2017)

greco-666x800El Greco comes to America: The Discovery of a Modern Old Master, directed by Inge Reist and José Luis Colomer
Este libro es un homenaje a los soberbios ejemplos de la obra del Greco
conservados en Estados Unidos. El estilo tan personal del artista tenía
un aire de modernidad que atraía a los coleccionistas de aquel país,
gracias a lo cual los museos americanos poseen muchos de los mejores
Grecos que hay fuera de España. Once especialistas abordan el estudio
de coleccionistas particulares como Arabella Huntington, Louisine
Havemeyer, Henry Clay Frick, Peter Widener y Duncan Phillips, pero
analizan también el impacto de las exposiciones en las que pudieron
verse obras del cretense y el papel que desempeñaron artistas-asesores
como Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent y Roger Fry.

Partiendo de una rica documentación de archivo, en gran parte inédita
hasta ahora, los autores de este volumen demuestran el denuedo con el
que los coleccionistas americanos compitieron por las obras del Greco y
el lugar tan destacado que concedieron en sus casas a los cuadros del
cretense, que a menudo colgaron junto a otros de pintores más modernos
como Degas o Manet. Al hacerlo, y al fomentar la compra de cuadros del
Greco por parte de las instituciones públicas que financiaban, forjaron
la reputación internacional de este artista entre el público
contemporáneo, garantizando un aprecio por su estilo único que se
mantiene todavía.

SOBRE LOS DIRECTORES [10]

INGE REIST, doctora por la Universidad de Columbia, donde dio clase
durante unos años, es directora del Center for the History of
Collecting de la Frick Art Reference Library. Dirigió también el
Archivo Fotográfico de la Frick Collection y fue presidenta de la
Association of Research Institutes in Art History. Es experta en
historia del coleccionismo, tema sobre el que ha publicado trabajos y
dado conferencias en numerosos museos y congresos. Ha coeditado con Gail
Feigenbaum _Provenance: An Alternative Art History_ (2012), aunque sigue
interesándose por otras cuestiones, como prueba su «_All the World’s a
Stage: The Theater Conceit in Early Modern Italy_» para el Blackwell
Companion to Renaissance and Baroque Art (2012).

JOSÉ LUIS COLOMER es doctor en Literatura Comparada por la Universidad
de Bolonia y licenciado en Historia del Arte por la Sorbona. Actualmente
dirige el Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica y el Center for Spain in
America. Sus investigaciones abordan las relaciones culturales entre
España e Italia en el siglo XVII a través de agentes diplomáticos y
del intercambio de regalos artísticos entre las cortes europeas y los
reyes de España, así como el segundo viaje a Roma de Velázquez y sus
vínculos con personajes italianos en la corte de Madrid. En 2012
codirigió con Inge Reist el libro Collecting Spanish Art: Spain’s
Golden Age and America’s Gilded Age.

264 páginas; 156 ilustraciones
ISBN: 978-84-15245-73-5
50 €
Until 15 December, 10% online discount, http://www.ceeh.es