Tag Archives: Spanish Art

Conference: ‘Ribera’s Art of Violence: New Intersections and Interventions’, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, December 10, 2018

Join us for a study day inspired by the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence. Examining Ribera’s art from various interdisciplinary perspectives, the event will bring together established and emerging voices to explore new approaches to the artist, his works, myths and audiences. The study day will be structured around the exhibition’s five thematic sections: Religious Violence; Skin and the Five Senses; Crime and Punishment; The Bound Figure; and Mythological Violence. Situating his paintings, prints and drawings within their historical context, this event will address the relevance of Ribera’s violent imagery in contemporary art and thought.

PROGRAMME
[Chaired by Edward Payne and Xavier Bray]

2–2.10pm
Introduction and Welcome: Edward Payne (Durham University) and Xavier Bray (Wallace Collection)

Session 1: Religious Violence

2.10–2.25pm
Jack Hartnell (University of East Anglia)
Backwards through Bartholomews: Tools and Techniques of Stripping Skin

2.25–2.35pm
Respondent: Helen Hills (University of York)

Session 2: Skin and the Five Senses

2.35–2.50pm
Carlo Avilio (University of Warwick)
See with the Fingers, Touch with the Eyes: Ribera and the Failure of Painting

2.50–3pm
Respondent: Joanna Woodall (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Session 3: Crime and Punishment

3–3.15pm
Stephen Cummins (Max Planck Institute)
Punishing Bodies in Ribera’s Naples: Torture, Incarceration and Slavery

3.15–3.25pm
Respondent: Helen Langdon (Independent Scholar)

3.30–4pm: Tea Break

Session 4: The Bound Figure

4–4.15pm
Caroline Fowler (Clark Art Institute)
Losing Control: Ribera’s Examination of Desire and Will

4.15–4.25pm
Respondent: TBC

Session 5: Mythological Violence

4.25–4.40pm
Bogdan Cornea (University of York)
Opening the Body, Opening Touch: Rethinking Violence in Ribera’s Apollo and Marsyas

4.40–4.50pm
Respondent: Gabriele Finaldi (National Gallery, London)

Keynote Address

4.50–5.20pm
Javier Moscoso (Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales)
The Liminality of Skin in the History of Pain

5.20–5.30pm
Concluding Remarks: Edward Payne (Durham University) and Xavier Bray (Wallace Collection)

5.30pm: Close

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Conference: ‘Ribera’s Art of Violence: New Intersections and Interventions’, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, December 10, 2018

Join us for a study day inspired by the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence. Examining Ribera’s art from various interdisciplinary perspectives, the event will bring together established and emerging voices to explore new approaches to the artist, his works, myths and audiences. The study day will be structured around the exhibition’s five thematic sections: Religious Violence; Skin and the Five Senses; Crime and Punishment; The Bound Figure; and Mythological Violence. Situating his paintings, prints and drawings within their historical context, this event will address the relevance of Ribera’s violent imagery in contemporary art and thought.

PROGRAMME
[Chaired by Edward Payne and Xavier Bray]

2–2.10pm
Introduction and Welcome: Edward Payne (Durham University) and Xavier Bray (Wallace Collection)

Session 1: Religious Violence

2.10–2.25pm
Jack Hartnell (University of East Anglia)
Backwards through Bartholomews: Tools and Techniques of Stripping Skin

2.25–2.35pm
Respondent: Helen Hills (University of York)

Session 2: Skin and the Five Senses

2.35–2.50pm
Carlo Avilio (University of Warwick)
See with the Fingers, Touch with the Eyes: Ribera and the Failure of Painting

2.50–3pm
Respondent: Joanna Woodall (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Session 3: Crime and Punishment

3–3.15pm
Stephen Cummins (Max Planck Institute)
Punishing Bodies in Ribera’s Naples: Torture, Incarceration and Slavery

3.15–3.25pm
Respondent: Helen Langdon (Independent Scholar)

3.30–4pm: Tea Break

Session 4: The Bound Figure

4–4.15pm
Caroline Fowler (Clark Art Institute)
Losing Control: Ribera’s Examination of Desire and Will

4.15–4.25pm
Respondent: TBC

Session 5: Mythological Violence

4.25–4.40pm
Bogdan Cornea (University of York)
Opening the Body, Opening Touch: Rethinking Violence in Ribera’s Apollo and Marsyas

4.40–4.50pm
Respondent: Gabriele Finaldi (National Gallery, London)

Keynote Address

4.50–5.20pm
Javier Moscoso (Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales)
The Liminality of Skin in the History of Pain

5.20–5.30pm
Concluding Remarks: Edward Payne (Durham University) and Xavier Bray (Wallace Collection)

5.30pm: Close

Clark Fellowships: CENTER FOR SPAIN IN AMERICA FELLOWSHIP, The Clark, deadline October 15, 2018

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The Clark Art Institute combines a public art museum with a complex of research and academic programs, including a major art history library. The Clark is an international center for discussion on the nature of art and its history.

Fellowships are awarded every year to established and promising scholars with the aim of fostering a critical commitment to inquiry in the theory, history, and interpretation of art and visual culture. In addition to providing an opportunity for sustained research for fellows, outside of their usual professional obligations, the Clark encourages them to participate in a variety of collaborative and public discussions on diverse art historical topics as well as on larger questions and motivations that shape the practice of art history.

Sponsored by the Center for Spain in America, this one-semester fellowship is intended to support the study of all aspects of Spanish art from the early medieval period to the beginning of the twentieth century, as well as the worldwide impact of Spanish art and artists. In addition to research for a publication and/or exhibition on specific artists or periods, we welcome projects examining collecting and connoisseurship of Spanish art—particularly in the Americas—and the influence and importance of Spanish art and its reception throughout the world.

Deadline: October 15, 2018

Click here for more information

Panel discussion: Spanish Women Artists in the UK, Edmond J. Safra Lecture Theatre, King’s College London, 11/09/2018, 7–9 pm

Spanish Women Artists in the UK

Four Spanish women artists based in the UK discuss their experiences and achievements in the Performing and Visual Arts:  Tamara Rojo, Artistic Director of the English National Ballet;  Angela de la Cruz, visual artist;  Paula Paz, associate director of the Cervantes Theatre; and Isabel del Rio, poet and writer.  The discussion will focus on how their Spanish background informs their work, on the unique artistic perspectives of biculturalism and bilingualism, and on their contribution to British Art and London’s cultural scene.
Event hosted by Idil Sukan, artist and photographer.
Tamara Rojo was appointed Artistic Director of English National Ballet in 2012.  She combines this role with her dancing career, performing as Lead Principal with the Company.  In January 2016 Tamara Rojo became D.A. Magna Cum Laude, presenting her thesis ‘Psychological Profile of the Elite Dancer – Vocational Characteristics of the Professional Dancer’ at Rey Juan Carlos University, and was awarded a CBE for her services to ballet in the Queen’s 2016 New Year’s Honours.
Angela de la Cruz studied Philosophy at the University of Santiago de Compostela.  In the late 80s she moved to London where she studied at Chelsea College of Art and later at Goldsmiths College and Slade School of Art.  She has exhibited in galleries all over the world, including the show entitled “After”, her first solo exhibition in the UK at Camden Arts Centre in April 2010.  In May 2010 she was nominated for the Turner Prize.
Paula Paz is co-founder and Associate Director of the Cervantes Theatre and the Spanish Theatre Company.  She is a theatre director and former professional ballet dancer and holds an MA with distinction in theatre directing from Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts.  She has directed The Little Pony, The Swallow, Darwin’s Tortoise, Knives in Hens, Eigengrau, History of a Staircase and Hay que deshacer la Casa.
Organized by Instituto Cervantes in collaboration with Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies (SPLAS) at King’s College London, The Spanish Women Network and the British Spanish Society.
For more information, click here. Free admission, RSVP.

Featured Exhibition: Gala Salvador Dalí: A Room of One’s Own in Púbol, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, until 14 October

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Salvador Dalí. Gala Placidia. Galatea of the Spheres, 1952. Fundació Gala- Salvador Dalí, Figueres © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018

Gala (7th September 1894 – 10th June 1982), born into a family of intellectuals from Kazan (Russia), spent her childhood in Moscow before moving to Switzerland and then Paris. There she befriended such prominent members of the surrealist movement as Max Ernst. In 1929 she travelled to Cadaqués, where she met Dalí. The two fell in love and started to live together, first during an eight-year exile in the United States and then in Portlligat, New York and Paris.

Gala, an enigmatic and intuitive lady famous as Salvador Dalí’s wife, muse and model, is the subject of this exhibition. Abandoning traditional stereotypes on the role of this figure, the show follows her transformation into a fully-fledged artist, exploring her artistic cooperation with Dalí and revealing the possible shared authorship of some works.

Click here for more information.

Call for Applications: Sculptural Workshops, Botín Foundation, Santander, 17–28 September 2018—deadline 10 August

901c9487cb6fed6497d73096ee245fbd-cristina-iglesias-land-artSince 1994, the Sculptural Workshops of the Botín Foundation have brought together in Santander young artists from all over the world, to work alongside major figures from the art world. For its next edition, which will take place between September 17 and 28, 2018, the sculptor Cristina Iglesias (San Sebastián, 1958) proposes a research workshop based on her work process, from intimate reflection in the studio through to the implementation of the project in the public sphere. Cristina Iglesias (winner of Spain’s National Sculpture Prize in 1999) is one of the most internationally recognized Spanish artists. Famous for her sculptural works, with suspended pavilions, lattices, corridors and labyrinths, the artist combines industrial materials and elements of nature in her works to create unusual places and spaces of experience. For two weeks, 15 artists will live with Iglesias exchanging experiences and shared work while developing their own personal project, which can also be shared with the public in an open day. The participants in the workshop will propose a project on a topic involving drawings, texts, plans, models or video, and in a place chosen by them that they will develop during their stay. Participants will also visit the city of Santander and its surroundings to discover places or contexts that will help them to develop their project. In addition the artists will visit the foundry in Éibar where Iglesias works, and her installation on the island of Santa Clara de San Sebastián.

The installation of the exhibition CRISTINA IGLESIAS: ENTRƎSPACIOS / INTERSPACES at the Botín Center 6 October 2018 – 24 February 2019 will allow them to discover in a practical way how the artist’s work occupies the space. As a final point of the workshop, the artists will present and defend their project before a panel of professionals who will study and evaluate the projects. The deadline for submitting applications to the workshop is August 10, 2018.

For further information about the workshop and grants towards accommodation and maintenance click here.

Job: Assistant Professor (Research): Pemberton Fellowship for the Study of Spanish Art, Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, University of Durham, UK

NNP-DURHAM_CONGREGATION_48This post is full-time and fixed term (1 September 2018 – 31 August 2019).

The Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art seeks to appoint an outstanding candidate to a one-year fixed-term Research Fellowship in Spanish and/or Neapolitan Art of the early modern period (1550-1750). This posts offer an exciting opportunity to make a major contribution to the development of research at the Zurbarán Centre in relation to Durham Castle (University College) at Durham University. The successful candidates will be expected to undertake internationally excellent research. There will also be the opportunity to contribute to teaching in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, with which the candidate will be administratively associated, to a maximum of 6 hours per week. The appointment is tenable from 1 September 2018 or as soon as possible thereafter.

We welcome applications from exceptional scholars with research interests Spanish art of the Golden Age and/or Italian art of the Classical and Baroque period, with a particular focus on major artistic centres such as Rome and Naples; in addition to painting, sculpture and architecture, we welcome applications centred also on decorative arts and garden history. The Pemberton Fellow will be associated with University College, located in Durham Castle, which houses a remarkable artistic collection which includes Spanish and Italian 17th-century art. The candidate will enjoy full board at Durham Castle (including meals and accommodation, subject to income tax and National Insurance deductions) as well as a contribution towards research related expenses.

Click here for more information