Tag Archives: Spanish Art

Job: Professor and Director of the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, School of Modern Languages and Cultures Durham University, UK, deadline 17th January 2020

Responsible to: Head of Department

Grade: Grade 10

Salary Range: Competitive salary based on our professorial Pay Scales (starting at £64,606 and going considerably higher based on experience)

Working arrangements: The role is full time, but we will consider requests for flexible working arrangements including potential job shares.

Open date: 30 September 2019

Closing date: 17 January 2020 at 12pm midday     

Preferred start date: Successful candidates will ideally be in post by 01 September 2020.

We are seeking an outstanding academic leader and scholar in Spanish and Latin American Art and/or Visual Culture to direct the interdisciplinary Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, a collaborative venture with The Auckland Project.

The Director will be an internationally recognised authority in her/his field who will act as an intellectual entrepreneur, developing academic contacts within Durham University, as well as nationally and internationally, and work in close collaboration with The Auckland Project’s forthcoming Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland – the central impetus for the creation of the Zurbarán Centre – on research, programming, and the development of joint initiatives. The Director will be located in an appropriate academic department of Durham University (Faculty of Arts and Humanities).

Auckland Castle, at the heart of The Auckland Project, is one of the most important working episcopal palaces in Europe, the seat of the Prince Bishops of Durham since the twelfth century. For more than 250 years, Auckland Castle has been home to the internationally significant cycle of masterpieces from the Spanish Golden Age, Jacob and his Twelve Sons by Francisco de Zurbarán, the inspiration for The Zurbarán Centre. Financier Jonathan Ruffer set up Auckland Castle Trust in 2012 (now The Auckland Project) to secure the future of the Zurbaráns in Bishop Auckland.

Durham University formally established the Zurbarán Centre in October 2016. The Centre’s collaboration with the Spanish Gallery will provide an unusual opportunity to combine engagement with connoisseurship of a new permanent collection with scholarship of, particularly, Golden Age art, playing to Durham University’s established strengths in Spanish and Latin American studies. The Centre is an embedded part of Durham University located in Bishop Auckland, where the Director will be primarily based.

This represents an exciting opportunity to further the ambitions of both partner organisations to become the leading home for the study and appreciation of Spanish and Latin American art. Over the past three years, the Centre has fostered research in Spanish and Latin American art in a global context, with a special focus on the art of Medieval Spain, the Spanish Golden Age, Mexican national art, the 19th-century history of collecting, and Spanish and Latin American cinema and photography.

New Exhibition and CEEH Publication: VALENTÍN CARDERERA Y SOLANO, Biblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid, September 27, 2019 – January 12, 2020

VALENTÍN CARDERERA Y SOLANO (Huesca, 1796 – Madrid, 1880) was a painter, scholar, communicator, collector and traveller. His life was marked by his efforts to safeguard Spain’s historical heritage and he journeyed around much of the Spanish mainland to bear witness in his drawings and watercolours to significant monuments, many at risk of disappearance as a result of the modernising drive ushered in by the new liberal order. Member of the Romantic generation and friends with the Madrazo family, Carderera was also in contact with some other figures like Richard Ford and Prosper Mérimée, with whom he shared the same nostalgia for the past and the need to define his position in the complex debate between tradition and progress.

The exhibition—featuring more than a hundred pieces including paintings, drawings, engravings, manuscripts, books, maps and objects—pays tribute to Carderera’s work and the significant legacy he left in the Biblioteca Nacional de España. In 1867 the Spanish State adquired his collection of drawings and prints: more than 45.000 pieces which enriched the department of Fine Arts with engravings of Mantegna, Dürer and Rembrandt, among others, along with one of the very few drawings attributed to Velázquez. Click here for more information.

The exhibition opens on 27 September in the Biblioteca Nacional de España’s Sala Hipóstila. It was curated by José María Lanzarote Guiral and organised by the Biblioteca Nacional de España and Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica.

It is accompanied by a an exhibition catalogue which reconstructs Carderera’s intense life in six thematic sections, published by CEEH. Until 25 September, the catalogue can be purchased from the CEEH website at special discount price. Click here for more information.

Lecture: ‘Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance’, by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, Conference Room 1, National Gallery, London, 4 September 2019, 2:30–3:30pm

ARTES committee member Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, assistant curator of the exhibition “Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance” at The National Gallery, will give a lecture on the life and works of this Spanish painter.

Bartolomé Bermejo was a fifteenth-century Spanish artist whose painting technique, mixing Spanish and Netherlandish features, was unparalleled amongst his Iberian contemporaries. He had a limited output of less than twenty paintings of which seven are featured in the current National Gallery exhibition. This is the first time that six of these paintings are shown in the UK and the restoration of the National Gallery’s painting of Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil (1468) has enabled the Gallery to showcase Bermejo’s earliest masterpiece. Following the two major Bermejo retrospectives at the Prado Museum and the MNAC (Barcelona), this exhibition features paintings ranging from different periods of Bermejo’s career demonstrating his development as he moved throughout the Crown of Aragon (mostly encompassing territories in eastern Spain). This talk will focus on the seven paintings shown in the exhibition considering them within their context and retracing Bermejo’s artistic career. Bermejo’s Saint Michael, the Acqui Terme triptych and the Desplà Pietà (reproduced above), will receive special attention in the lecture, which will compare their donors, production, intended location and historical context.

This event is for a general audience and is organised by the Instituto Cervantes — London. Free, reistration required. Click here to register.

Pre- and Post-Doctoral Fellowships at the Meadows Museum, Dallas, Texas

Center for Spain in America (CSA) Curatorial Fellowship

Pre-doctoral fellowships are supported by the Center for Spain in America (CSA). The Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica (CEEH) and the Center for Spain in America (CSA) encourage studies on Spanish history, art and literature by establishing doctoral and postdoctoral scholarships at European and American universities, as well as at research centers whose holdings are particularly relevant to the knowledge of Spanish culture. They likewise establish assistantships for curatorial work at museums with significant holdings of Spanish painting.

Requirements:

  • Pre-doctoral students who have completed their course work
  • At least one year of curatorial experience in an art museum; demonstrated knowledge in the field of Spanish art; proficient in Spanish (reading, writing, and speaking).
  • Is appointed by and reports to the director and curatorial staff of the Meadows Museum.
  • Serves a full-time appointment of one year, beginning in September 2020.
  • Performs curatorial research and is responsible for projects as assigned.
  • Travel stipend for research as well as trips to Spain and other destinations as directed by the museum director to perform research and project-based assignments.

Applicants must submit:

  • A full résumé
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • A statement (not to exceed 1500 words) specifying:
    • 1) the applicant’s research goals;
    • 2) how these goals relate to or will benefit the Meadows Museum; and
    • 3) how resources at the Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University and travel related research might be used to accomplish those goals.
  • Applications and letters of recommendation must be received by November 22, 2019. Electronic submissions will not be accepted.

Mail to:

Anne Kindseth
Interim Director of Education
Meadows Museum
P.O. Box 750357
Dallas, Texas 75275-0357

For more information, please contact: akindseth@smu.edu

Mellon Curatorial Fellowship

Post-doctoral fellowships are supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which seeks to strengthen, promote, and defend the centrality of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse, fair, and democratic societies. To this end, its core programs support exemplary and inspiring institutions of higher education and culture.

Requirements:

  • Post-doctoral students who have earned their Ph.D. within the last five years
  • At least one year of curatorial experience in an art museum; demonstrated knowledge in the field of Spanish art; proficient in Spanish (reading, writing, and speaking).
  • Is appointed by and reports to the director and curatorial staff of the Meadows Museum.
  • Serves a full-time appointment of two years, beginning in September 2020.
  • Performs curatorial research and is responsible for projects as assigned.
  • Travel stipend for research as well as trips to Spain and other destinations as directed by the museum director to perform research and project-based assignments.
  • Author a scholarly article for publication and present at least two public lectures, as well as actively participate in the research and organization of special exhibitions or projects.
  • Culminate fellowship by organizing a scholarly, international, two-day colloquium focusing on new research in Spanish art history.

Applicants must submit:

  • A full résumé
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • A statement (not to exceed 1500 words) specifying:
    • 1) the applicant’s research goals;
    • 2) how these goals relate to or will benefit the Meadows Museum; and
    • 3) how resources at the Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University and travel related research might be used to accomplish those goals.
  • Applications and letters of recommendation must be received by November 22, 2019. Electronic submissions will not be accepted.

Click here for more information

Opens Today: Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance, National Gallery, London, until 29 September 2019

bjo_desktopbannerBermejo is one of the greatest Spanish artists of the second half of the 15th century.

This exhibition, in the National Gallery’s Room 1, brings two of his masterpieces: the triptych of the ‘Madonna of Montserrat’ from the cathedral at Acqui Terme, Alessandria (Italy) and the ‘Piedad Desplà’ from Barcelona Cathedral, to the UK for the first time.

In addition, The National Gallery’s own painting by Bermejo, the magnificent ‘Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil‘, returns on display following its recent conservation, revealing the painting’s exquisite details and the extent of Bermejo’s artistry.

Click here for more information, and click here for ARTES’ Study Morning in the exhibiton (27 June 2019).

Programme and Registration Details: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, 20th–21st June 2019, Senate Suite, Durham University Castle, Durham, UK


Organised by Stefano Cracolici and Edward Payne (Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, Durham University)

Free, but please register at this link: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/canons-and-repertoires-constructing-the-visual-arts-in-the-hispanic-world-registration-62569293441

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers will challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers will also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers will address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules.

PROGRAMME

Thursday 20 June 2019

09.30 – 10.00 Registration & Coffee
10.00 – 10.05Introduction & Welcome
10.05 – 11.20 Session 1: Historiographies
Chair: Stefano Cracolici (Durham University)
10.05 – 10.25 Why El Greco to Goya?
Edward Payne (Durham University)
10.25 – 10.45Frederic Leighton’s Vision of Spain
Véronique Gerard Powell (Sorbonne Université, Paris)
10.45 – 11.05  Nigel Glendinning and the Hispanic Research Journal: A Unique Voice in Spanish Cultural
History
Sarah Symmons (University of Essex)
11.05 – 11.20 Discussion
11.20 – 11.50 Tea & Coffee
11.50 – 12.50 Keynote Lecture:
Passion and Prejudice: Attitudes to Spanish Sculpture in Nineteenth-Century Britain
Holly Trusted (Victoria & Albert Museum, London)
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 15.15 Session 2: Geographies
Chair: Edward Payne (Durham University)
14.00 – 14.20 Beyond El Greco: The Travelling Artist between Italy and Spain—Artistic Translation and the
Sixteenth-Century Hispanic Canon
Piers Baker-Bates (The Open University)
14.20 – 14.40Maestros españoles en Chile: Espacios y repertorios
Marcela Drien (Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Santiago de Chile)
14.40 – 15.00 Geographic Limits and the History of the Spanish Avant-Garde
Maite Barragán (Albright College, Reading PA)
15.00 – 15.15 Discussion
15.15 – 16.30Session 3: Strategies
Chair: Tom Stammers (Durham University)
15.15 – 15.35Genaro Pérez Villaamil: Navigating Stereotypes
Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh)
15.35 – 15.55 Imaginary Architecture as Imagined Community: ‘The Market’ by Jenaro Pérez Villaamil
Matilde Mateo (Syracuse University)
15.55 – 16.15 Hieroglyphs of Providence: Pelegrín Clavé and Isabella I of Castile
Stefano Cracolici (Durham University)
16.15 – 16.30 Discussion
16.30 – 17.00 Tea & Coffee
17.00 – 18.00 Keynote Lecture
Canons and Repertoires in Hispanic Art: What does Stirling Maxwell have to do with them?
Hilary Macartney (University of Glasgow)

Friday 21 June 2019

9.30 – 10.00 Tea & Coffee
10.00 – 11.15 Session 4: Identities
Chair: Giovanna Capitelli (Università Roma Tre)
10.00 – 10.20 El arte español más allá de la península ibérica: ¿Qué significa ser un ‘artista español en la Nueva España’?
Luis Javier Cuesta Hernández (Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México)
10.20 – 10.40 Constructing the Monuments of the Nation: Victor Balaguer and the Struggle to Shape Monasteries as Spanishness
Josep-Maria Garcia-Fuentes (Newcastle University)
10.40 – 11.00 Thinking Spain from Barcelona: The Iconographic Repertoire of Spanish Art (1918–1922)
Lucila Mallart (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
11.00 – 11.15 Discussion
11.15 – 11.45Tea & Coffee
11.45 – 13.00Session 5: Remediations
Chair: Ludmilla Jordanova (Durham University)
11.45 – 12.05 Thinking through Painting: Artistic Practice as Metaphor in the Early Modern Hispanic World
Adam Jasienski (Southern Methodist University, Dallas TX)
12.05 – 12.25 From Mimesis to Montage: Sergei Eisenstein on El Greco
Dušan Radunović (Durham University)
12.25 – 12.45 ‘Ese Velázquez sí que era un genio’: el canon del arte español y la ficción televisiva
Luis Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez (Universitat de València)
12.45 – 13.00 Discussion
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 14.20Concluding Remarks
Amaya Alzaga Ruiz (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid)
14.20 – 15.00 Roundtable Discussion
15.00 – 16.00 Refreshment

CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019, deadline 31 March!

whitecanonsrepertoiresbanner

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.