Tag Archives: Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art

RECORDING: Madeleine Haddon (University Of Edinburgh), ‘The Cuban Maja: La Mulata In The Work Of Victor Patricio Landaluze’, Online talk for the Research Seminar Series organized by ARTES and the Zurbarán Centre For Spanish and Latin American Art

In advance of tomorrow’s final lecture in the ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre Online Seminar Series, please find the recording of Madeleine Haddon’s talk, ‘The Cuban Maja: La Mulata In The Work Of Victor Patricio Landaluze’, delivered on March 24th, 2021.

This talk is part of a series of 12 research seminars, many of which will also be recorded and available on the ARTES site. Please click here for more information on the seminar series.

Please join us for the final talk in the series tomorrow, March 31st, 6-7pm. The talk will be delivered by Laura Fernández-González (University Of Lincoln), and is titled ‘Conventual Possessions In The Iberian World: Inventories In Comparative Perspective’.

The series is free and open to all with an interest in the visual arts. Booking is essential. Please email the Zurbarán Centre (Zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk) to register and to receive a zoom link. Please note registration closes 24 hours before the seminar.

NIGEL GLENDINNING LECTURE: Jesús Escobar (Northwestern University), “All Roads Lead to the Plaza de Palacio: Architecture and Ceremony in Habsburg Madrid”, 17 March, 6-7pm, via Zoom

An annual event in honour of the great Hispanist Nigel Glendinning, organised by ARTES and the Instituto Cervantes. Part of the twelve-part seminar series hosted by ARTES and the Zurbarán Centre at Durham University.

17th March 2021, 18:00 to 19:00

Used by people of all classes and fronted by the architectural seat of imperial government, the Plaza de Palacio was the preeminent space of power in Habsburg Madrid. In the 1670s, during the regency of Mariana of Austria, it was lined with arcades and adorned with sculpture. This talk explores the plaza’s design within the context of late seventeenth-century European urbanism, demonstrating that its transformation reflects Madrid’s evolving image as the capital of an empire.

Jesús Escobar is Associate Professor at Northwestern University, Chicago. He arrived at Northwestern in 2008 and chaired the Department of Art History for seven years between 2010 and 2018. He is a scholar of art, architecture, and urbanism in early modern Spain and the larger Spanish Habsburg world. His first book, The Plaza Mayor and the Shaping of Baroque Madrid (Cambridge University Press, 2003; paperback, 2009), explored the interchange of architecture and politics in the evolution of Madrid from a secondary city of Castile to the seat of a global empire in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The book won the Eleanor Tufts Award from the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies and was published in a Spanish-language edition in 2008 by Editorial Nerea. His second book, Habsburg Madrid: Architecture and the Spanish Monarchy (Penn State University Press, forthcoming in 2022), examines government buildings and public spaces built and shaped between 1620 and 1700 from local, regional, and global vantage points. Other recent and ongoing projects consider the monastery-palace of El Escorial, transatlantic Renaissance and Baroque religious architecture in the Spanish Empire, and the historiography of seventeenth-century architecture in Spain. With Michael Schreffler of the University of Notre Dame, he is at work on another book tentatively titled Architecture in the Spanish World, 1500 to 1800.

Booking is essential. Please email the Zurbarán Centre (Zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk) to register and to receive a zoom link.

Please click here for more information about the ARTES/ Zurbarán Centre seminar series.

Image: Nicolas Guérard I, after Felipe Pallota, Aspecto del Real Palacio de Madrid, 4 de Marzo de 1704, The British Museum, no. 1859,0514.341.104, ©The Trustees of the British Museum.

TONIGHT: Jonathan Ruffer (The Auckland Project), ‘Juan Bautista Maíno – A Great Artist At The Spanish Gallery, Bishop Auckland’, ARTES and Zurbarán Centre Seminar Series, 6-7pm

Booking is essential. Email Zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk to register and to receive a zoom link.

More information: http://www.dur.ac.uk/zurbaran/news-events/events

RECORDING: Yarí Pérez Marín, ‘Illustrating medical treatment in colonial Latin America’. Online talk for the Research Seminar Series organized by ARTES and the Zurbarán Centre For Spanish and Latin American Art

Recording of a talk delivered online on January 27th, 2021 as part of the research seminar series organized by Durham University’s Zurbarán Centre For Spanish and Latin American Art with ARTES Iberian & Visual Culture Group, with the collaboration of Instituto Cervantes in the UK

This talk was delivered as part of a series of 12 research seminars, many of which will also be recorded and available on the ARTES site.

The weekly sessions usually take place on Wednesdays, 6.00-7.00pm, except the fourth session scheduled for Tuesday, 2 February. The talks last ca. 40 minutes and are followed by Q&A.

The series is free and open to all with an interest in the visual arts. Booking is essential. Please email the Zurbarán Centre (Zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk) to register and to receive a zoom link. Please note registration closes 24 hours before the seminar.

Please click here for more details

RECORDING: Piers Baker-Bates, ‘”In the Spanish Fashion”: An Italian-Spanish Cultural Relationship Reconsidered’. Online talk for the Research Seminar Series organized by ARTES and the Zurbarán Centre For Spanish and Latin American Art

Recording of Piers Baker-Bates’ talk delivered online on January 13th, 2021, as part of the research seminar series organized by Durham University’s Zurbarán Centre For Spanish and Latin American Art with ARTES Iberian & Visual Culture Group, with the collaboration of Instituto Cervantes in the UK

This is the first in a series of 12 seminars, many of which will also be recorded and available on the ARTES site.

The weekly sessions usually take place on Wednesdays, 6.00-7.00pm, except the fourth session scheduled for Tuesday, 2 February. The talks last ca. 40 minutes and are followed by Q&A.

The series is free and open to all with an interest in the visual arts. Booking is essential. Please email the Zurbarán Centre (Zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk) to register and to receive a zoom link. Please note registration closes 24 hours before the seminar.

Please click here for more information.

ARTES and the Zurbarán Centre at Durham University present a 12-week online seminar series, including the annual Glendinning Lecture

We are very pleased to announce that the Zurbarán Centre has teamed up with ARTES Iberian & Latin American Visual Culture Group to organise an exciting 12-week online Research Seminar Series starting on 13 January and running through to 31 March 2021. It provides a forum for engaging with the latest research by national and international scholars who specialise in Iberian and Latin American art and visual culture. The topics are rich and diverse, ranging from Nasrid architecture to twentieth-century art writing on Afro-Brazilian art.

The series also incorporates the prestigious annual Glendinning Lecture in honour of the eminent Hispanist Nigel Glendinning, organised by ARTES with the Instituto Cervantes. The lecture will be given by Professor Jesús Escobar (Northwestern University, Chicago), who will be speaking on ‘All Roads Lead to the Plaza de Palacio: Architecture and Ceremony in Habsburg Madrid’ (17 March).

Furthermore a special seminar (3 March) will be devoted to the collection of the new Spanish Gallery, due to open in Bishop Auckland in the summer of 2021. The series is free and open to anyone interested in the visual arts.

Please email the Zurbarán Centre (Zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk) to register and to receive a zoom link. Please note registration closes 24 hours before the seminar.closes 24 hours in advance of each seminar. Click here for

Text from the Zurbarán Centre newsletter and website

Zurbarán Doctoral Scholarship for the Study of Spanish Art, Durham University

The Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art at Durham University invites applications for a doctoral scholarship in Spanish art-historical studies, commencing in the academic year 2021/22. The scholarship has been created thanks to the generous support of the CEEH (Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica) in association with ARTES and The Auckland Project. It supports research projects on Spanish art from the Golden Age to around 1900, including the reception of Spanish art. The successful candidate will enjoy privileged access to the Spanish Gallery at The Auckland Project, which is due to open in 2021 in Bishop Auckland. The scholarship is tenable for three years full-time (or five years part-time). Details on the eligibility criteria and the application process can be found here. Interested candidates are advised to contact the Zurbarán Centre administration (Zurbaran.Centre@durham.ac.uk) at least four weeks in advance of the application deadline: 31 March 2021.

New webinar series: ‘Museums in the Wake of COVID-19’, presented by Durham University and the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art. First session on Tuesday 7 July 2020, 6.00 pm – 7.00 pm (UK time), via Microsoft teams

image: Durham University and the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art

The Covid-19 pandemic has forced us all to rethink our ways to travel, gather, and socialize. Museums and exhibition venues have not been exempt from necessary adjustments. These four informal early evening conversations are an occasion for reflecting upon the role of social media and the arts during lockdown and upon the challenges that the times post Covid-19 context will pose to the museum experience. They are intended as a dialogue on undertaking or prospect about the dialogue for new initiatives and positive responses to cope with the current uncertainty. 

We are delighted to be discussing these challenges with academics and curators, including representatives from the Real Academia de San Fernando, the Meadows Museum, the Sir John Soane’s Museum, the Bowes Museum, and the Royal Academy of Arts.  

We are pleased to announce below the speakers for our talks, scheduled at 6-7 pm (UK time) every Tuesday in July. Each session will include talks from experts on the topic. The 15-minute presentations will be followed by half an hour of informal conversation with the attendees.

Advanced registration is required for access to the webinar. Please send an email to one of the organisers Elisabetta Maistri (elisabetta.maistri@durham.ac.uk), or to Patricia Manzano Rodríguez (patricia.manzano-rodiguez@durham.ac.uk), both Ph.D. candidates at the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, University College, MLAC, Durham University.

The four sessions will be:

JULY 7: Social Media and the Art Museum

Irene Llorca, José Guerrero and Emma Calvo, Managers of the Covid Art Museum on Instagram.

Isabel Sánchez-Bella Solís, Real Academia de San Fernando (Madrid). 

JULY 14: Temporary Exhibitions after Covid-19 Outbreak

Dr Amanda W. Dotseth, Curator in the Meadows Museum (Dallas, Texas).

Patrizia Piscitello, Head of Exhibitions and Loans in Museo di Capodimonte (Naples).

JULY 21: Impact of Covid-19 in Temporary Exhibitions 

Helen Dorey MBE, FSA, Deputy Director and Inspectress at Sir John Soane’s Museum (London).

Dr Jane Whittaker, Head of Collections at the Bowes Museum (co. Durham).

JULY  28: Educational Mission of Museums and Covid-19 

Dr Rebecca Lyons, Director of Collections & Learning, Royal Academy of Arts (London)

Prof. Nuria Rodríguez Ortega, Head of the Art History Department of the Universidad de Málaga (Málaga).

Leonardo Impett, Bibliotheca Hertziana (Rome) and Durham University (to be confirmed). 

Zurbarán Fellow Public Lecture: Dr Luis Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez, ‘The empire strikes back: Baroque art and Spanish contemporary culture’, 12th November at 5.30 pm, Kenworthy Hall, St Mary’s College, Durham University

Hispanic identity has been shaped during the last century by a conscious selection of historical periods of its history. After the loss of the last colonies of the former Spanish Empire at the end of the 19th century, the nation had hit rock bottom in political terms. To counterbalance this decline, writers, poets, essayists and scholars from the so-called generation of ’98 aimed for the restoration of the cultural splendor of the Spanish Golden Age, a period of flourishing in the arts and literature that spans from Philip II’s reign until the death of Charles II in 1700, the last of the Habsburg monarchs. This wish has been constant through the 20th century and is also connected with the rise of neobaroque aesthetics and postmodernism. Baroque has become a multifaceted concept and, nowadays, is more a space of reflection than a chronological or formal label. The lecture will explore the continuity of baroque art in Spanish contemporary culture such as art, photography, cinema, pop music, comics, cartoons, internet memes, football or television series, where the fascination with Spanish Golden Age is not only a matter of style or aesthetics but also political and identitary. From inspiration to appropriation, from art galleries to politics, baroque art is a powerful tool in contemporary Spain.

Click here for more information.

Job: Professor and Director of the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, School of Modern Languages and Cultures Durham University, UK, deadline 17th January 2020

Responsible to: Head of Department

Grade: Grade 10

Salary Range: Competitive salary based on our professorial Pay Scales (starting at £64,606 and going considerably higher based on experience)

Working arrangements: The role is full time, but we will consider requests for flexible working arrangements including potential job shares.

Open date: 30 September 2019

Closing date: 17 January 2020 at 12pm midday     

Preferred start date: Successful candidates will ideally be in post by 01 September 2020.

We are seeking an outstanding academic leader and scholar in Spanish and Latin American Art and/or Visual Culture to direct the interdisciplinary Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, a collaborative venture with The Auckland Project.

The Director will be an internationally recognised authority in her/his field who will act as an intellectual entrepreneur, developing academic contacts within Durham University, as well as nationally and internationally, and work in close collaboration with The Auckland Project’s forthcoming Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland – the central impetus for the creation of the Zurbarán Centre – on research, programming, and the development of joint initiatives. The Director will be located in an appropriate academic department of Durham University (Faculty of Arts and Humanities).

Auckland Castle, at the heart of The Auckland Project, is one of the most important working episcopal palaces in Europe, the seat of the Prince Bishops of Durham since the twelfth century. For more than 250 years, Auckland Castle has been home to the internationally significant cycle of masterpieces from the Spanish Golden Age, Jacob and his Twelve Sons by Francisco de Zurbarán, the inspiration for The Zurbarán Centre. Financier Jonathan Ruffer set up Auckland Castle Trust in 2012 (now The Auckland Project) to secure the future of the Zurbaráns in Bishop Auckland.

Durham University formally established the Zurbarán Centre in October 2016. The Centre’s collaboration with the Spanish Gallery will provide an unusual opportunity to combine engagement with connoisseurship of a new permanent collection with scholarship of, particularly, Golden Age art, playing to Durham University’s established strengths in Spanish and Latin American studies. The Centre is an embedded part of Durham University located in Bishop Auckland, where the Director will be primarily based.

This represents an exciting opportunity to further the ambitions of both partner organisations to become the leading home for the study and appreciation of Spanish and Latin American art. Over the past three years, the Centre has fostered research in Spanish and Latin American art in a global context, with a special focus on the art of Medieval Spain, the Spanish Golden Age, Mexican national art, the 19th-century history of collecting, and Spanish and Latin American cinema and photography.