Category Archives: ARTES

New Page Announcement: 3D Models

screenshot from the 3D model of the cloister of the Cathedral of Leon by Miguel Bandera

There is a new page on the ARTES website dedicated to 3D models of architecture and objects from the Iberian Peninsula (click here). A page dedicated to 3D models for Latin America is coming soon. Find them under the ‘Online Resources’ tab on the top of the site. These lists are not exhaustive, and will be updated regularly.

Have anything to add to the Iberian list, or ideas for the Latin American list? Please comment on this post with your suggestions (‘leave a reply’).

Museums online: content from the National Gallery of Ireland, the Museo del Prado, the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, and Google Arts and Culture

Virtual tour of ‘Murillo: The Prodigal Son Restored’ at the National Gallery of Ireland

Photo © National Gallery of Ireland. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682), The Departure of the Prodigal Son, 1660s.

The Gallery is scheduled to reopen on July 20th, but until then you can visit virtually. The online version features a 360 degree image of the exhibition with the possibility to zoom in on the paintings and read the accompanying labels and text panels.

‘Discovering the Collection’ video series from the Museo del Prado

The museum’s director, conservators, curators, archivists, and other experts present 5-10 minute talks focused on key aspects of the permanent collection, including individual works and entire areas, such as the rare books from the museum’s library (in Spanish).

‘Despite the Distance’ video series from the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga in Lisbon

The director, researchers, and the heads of various departments have recorded short talks from inside the museum during the lockdown to share details about the history and conservation of various works in the collection (in Portuguese).

Google Arts and Culture virtual collections

This site features virtual museum visits from around the world, which you can navigate with a map or alphabetically,such as the Muesu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya in Barcelona or the Museo Nacional de Arte in Mexico City. It is also worth exploring the other features of the site, including high definition images, narrated talks about individual works, virtual tours of famous sites, and much more.

Reopening Museums and Galleries in Spain Post Lockdown: A guide from the Spanish Ministry of Culture and Sport

Photo: ICOM

The Spanish government’s Ministry of Culture and Sport has recently published a document detailing how museums and galleries may be able to manage visitors and collections once lockdown has been fully lifted in Spain. Xanthe Brooke has written a summary of their guidance:

‘In addition to implementing hygiene and physical distancing rules the Dept. considers that in the short term at least there will be no room for block-buster exhibitions attracting mass tourism, nor social and educational activities attracting groups of visitors, and that cultural activities should resume with the limitation of capacity to one third. Museum libraries, archives and research rooms will not be available to the public until the de-escalation phases have been completed and, in any case, assistance by telematic means will prevail. 

Instead museums and galleries should continue to make their collections accessible by placing their collections online by digitisation, virtual reality, and other technological means. The Dept. goes on to state that though lower visitor numbers might increase the quality of the visit, it might also lead to a more ‘elitist museum’, and so museums must ensure that future visitors are diverse, and seek out methods in which participation can involve different sectors of society.

The Reina Sofía Museum of Contemporary Art has already announced that when it re-opens, sometime in early to mid-June, as well as abiding by hygiene and temperature advice, it will: aim to reduce its visitor numbers to 30% of its previous footfall; introduce a 1-way system around its rooms; and withdraw paper brochures, maps, plans and guides to the museum to prevent the transfer of the virus, and instead introduce an app for visitors’ mobile phones.’

Please find additional information on the guidance here (in Spanish): https://www.hoyesarte.com/artes-visuales/como-planificar-la-reapertura-de-los-museos_278418/

Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal 2020

12.124.1ARTES is delighted to announce the winner of the 2020 Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal, awarded with the generous support of the Office of Cultural and Scientific Affairs of the Spanish Embassy in London

Plate [detail], Portugal, ca. 1500–1525, embossed silver-gilt, 3.3 x diam. 22 cm. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image: Public Domain.

This year’s prize is awarded to Dr Simon Park, an early career scholar at the University of Oxford. Simon’s essay, ‘Chasing Wild Men (in Silver)’ examined silverwork in early Renaissance Portugal, and was highly commended by the committee.

We regret that the postponement of our AGM means we cannot award the prize in person, but congratulate Simon on a wonderful piece of research.

 

 

ARTES CEEH Scholars 2020

ARTES and CEEH are delighted to announce the first ever ARTES CEEH Scholars! Out of many excellent applications, we are very pleased to make the following four awards:

Scholarship for a PhD student in the UK (£3000)

Carter LyonCarter Lyon (University of Glasgow)

Title: Spanish Golden Age Art Theory in Practice: A case study of Vicente Carducho’s Self Portrait in the collection of Sir William Stirling Maxwell

Supervisors: Dr Mark Richter and Dr Hilary Macartney

PC.116_01

Vicente Carducho, Self Portrait (c. 1633-38). Oil on canvas. 102 x 83cm. The Stirling Maxwell Collection, Pollok House, Glasgow, PC.116. © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums and Libraries Collections

My research concerns the relationship between art theory and artistic practice in the Spanish Golden Age as evidenced in the works of the scholar-artist Vicente Carducho (1568-1638). At the core of my project are Carducho’s Self Portrait (c. 1633-38, Glasgow Museums) and his treatise Diálogos de la Pintura (1633). Adopting a technical art history methodology, I have conducted a technical study of Self Portrait that I will interpret in light of Carducho’s presentation of painting as a liberal art and his proposals for its practice. Consideration of Carducho’s professional activities and contemporary Spanish paintings and treatises will inform my analysis.

 

 

 

Scholarship for a PhD/post-doc student in Spain (£3000)

Alex MillonAlexandra Millón Maté (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Title: “Fancy pictures”? The British Reception of Murillo, 1650-1900

Supervisors: Professor Felipe Pereda Espeso (Harvard University) and Dr. María Cruz de Carlos Varona (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid).

The main purpose of this interdisciplinary project is to study the reception of genre painting by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Seville, 1617-1682) in the United Kingdom between 1650 and 1900. It is a project dedicated to one of the fundamental chapters of my doctoral thesis registered at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. To carry out this project, it is necessary to reside in London for at least 6-8 weeks to have daily access to the National Gallery Archive, the British Library, the City of London Archive, the Royal Academy Archive, the Tate Gallery Archive and Dulwich Picture Gallery Archive.

Alex Millon2

Esteban Murillo, Four Figures on a Step, c. 1655-60. Kimbell Art Museum painting

In the same way, it will be very important for my work to have a longer access to the archives of Nigel Glendinning and Enriqueta Harris both at the Warburg Institute and at the University of London, as well as the collection and auction documentation area of The Courtauld Institute of Arts. Exceptionally, this project also includes some trips to other nearby cities to continue documentation work at Bedforshire Archives, Dyrham Park and Kingston Lacy, and just one more trip to Scotland. In Edinburgh I will visit the Spanish collection of the Scottish National Gallery and consult the documentary section dedicated to Murillo in his library and, in Glasgow, I will visit the collection of Sir William Stirling Maxwell at Pollok House.

ARTES CEEH Travel Scholarships (£1000 each)

RasbridgeVictoria Rasbridge (University College London)

Title: Intersecting Identities: Troubled and Troubling Representations of Queenship on the Early Modern Spanish Stage

Supervisor: Dr Alexander Samson

I plan to spend eight days in Almagro in early July, sufficient time to attend the three-day AHCT conference, explore the archives, and attend a variety of performances. Specifically, in the Museo Nacional de Teatro, I will examine the ‘Genealogía’ of the ‘Cofradía de la Novena’ manuscript found in the ‘archivo documental’. Its collection of members’ personal anecdotes pertaining to specific performances and roles will grant new insight into how visual representations and staged performances of queenship were adapted for different audiences in different spaces. Moreover, the unique opportunity to view the comedia in its original setting will allow me to experience first-hand how performance and staging have been adapted to the physical space of the corral and, in turn, how that space dictated or prevented specific staging choices.

Rasbridge1

Queen Mariana of Austria, Diego Velázquez [1652]. Oil on Canvas, 231 x 131cm . Madrid, Museo Nacional Del Prado

Following this, I intend to spend a further ten days in Madrid dividing my time between the Real Biblioteca and the BNE. Firstly, in the Real Biblioteca, I will investigate the numerous comedia manuscripts and personal correspondence detailing royal reactions to performances held in its ‘Conde de Gondomar’ collection. Secondly, in the BNE, I will consult the extensive ‘Teatro’ collection, particularly interesting for its copy of Calderón de la Barca’s ‘Triunfar muriendo’ and a rare 48-volume series of comedias (1652-1704). Using these materials, I will examine marginal annotations to uncover how important scenes have been staged and enacted.

 

Sarah Slingluff (University of Edinburgh)

Sarah SlinguffTitle: Material Culture of the Arab/Berber Conquest: Excavations at the fortress of Zorita Castle and Surveying the Museums of the thaghr al-awsaṭ

Supervisor: Dr Glaire Anderson

I intend to conduct research this July at Zorita Castle in order to discover the ways in which those who led the Arab/Berber conquest of the Iberian Peninsula lived. In addition to the excavation, I will document holdings of museums in Castile La Mancha, Extremadura, and Madrid relating to life in Islamic Spain. This research allows a comparison of early medieval elite and non-elite experiences in central Spain.

Sarah Slinguff2

View of the fortress of Zorita de los Canes, from Recopolis. Photo by Sarah Slingluff, March 2020

This work will support my doctoral thesis on both the life of non-elite peoples in early medieval Spain, but also on the ways that this experience is represented in Spanish institutions.

 

 

Several spaces still available for the ‘Bomberg and Spain’ discussion with exhibition curator Richard Cork at the National Gallery on Tuesday 25 February, 10:05 to 11 am [RSVP by Friday 21st]

You are cordially invited to an informal study morning in the exhibition Young Bomberg and the Old Masters (27 November 2019 – 1 March 2020)

David Bomberg
Study for ‘Sappers at Work: A Canadian Tunnelling Company, Hill 60, St Eloi’, about 1918–9
Oil on canvas
304.2 × 243.8 cm
Tate, London (T00319)
Purchased 1959
© Tate

10:05 am            

Meet at the exhibition in Gallery 1 (accessible via the Getty Entrance to the right of the main portico on Trafalgar Square).

Self-led tour of the exhibition and discussion (coordinated by National Gallery Spanish Paintings Curatorial Fellow Akemi Herráez). The discussion will take place during normal museum opening hours so please be mindful of other visitors.

10:30 – 11:00 am

Followed by curator Richard Cork’s overview of the exhibition and further discussion with a presentation including Bomberg’s paintings of Spain in the Wilkins Boardroom, Wilkins Building (Akemi Herráez will take the group from the exhibition to the conference room).

Attendees may check their belongings into one of the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery. There is a bench in the exhibition for those who wish to sit. Please note that this study morning is by invitation only. Numbers are strictly limited to a quota of 13 people and places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

We kindly ask you to RSVP to akemi.herraezvossbrink@ng-london.org.uk by Friday 21 February 2020.

ARTES Members’ Event: Discussion on Bomberg and Spain, The National Gallery, London, 25 February 2020, 10:05–11:00am (RSVP by 21 February)

You are cordially invited to an informal study morning in the exhibition Young Bomberg and the Old Masters (27 November 2019 – 1 March 2020)

David Bomberg
Study for ‘Sappers at Work: A Canadian Tunnelling Company, Hill 60, St Eloi’, about 1918–9
Oil on canvas
304.2 × 243.8 cm
Tate, London (T00319)
Purchased 1959
© Tate

10:05 am            

Meet at the exhibition in Gallery 1 (accessible via the Getty Entrance to the right of the main portico on Trafalgar Square).

Self-led tour of the exhibition and discussion (coordinated by National Gallery Spanish Paintings Curatorial Fellow Akemi Herráez). The discussion will take place during normal museum opening hours so please be mindful of other visitors.

10:30 – 11:00 am

Followed by curator Richard Cork’s overview of the exhibition and further discussion with a presentation including Bomberg’s paintings of Spain in the Wilkins Boardroom, Wilkins Building (Akemi Herráez will take the group from the exhibition to the conference room).

Attendees may check their belongings into one of the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery. There is a bench in the exhibition for those who wish to sit. Please note that this study morning is by invitation only. Numbers are strictly limited to a quota of 13 people and places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

We kindly ask you to RSVP to akemi.herraezvossbrink@ng-london.org.uk by Friday 21 February 2020.

Professor Trevor Dadson, 1948-2020

ARTES records with regret the death of Professor Trevor Dadson in January 2020. As Editor-in-Chief of the Hispanic Research Journal from 2012 to 2017, Trevor was a tremendous enthusiast of the annual visual arts issue, and a great supporter of its editors, Tom Nickson and Sarah Symmons.

Trevor was also an incredibly distinguished scholar whose work encompassed cultural, literary and social history. He dedicated his career to the study of the Spanish Golden Age, becoming one of the world’s foremost experts on the era. He  published dozens of books, chapters and research papers throughout his career and was made a Fellow of the British Academy in 2008. In that same year, the Spanish town of Villarrubia de los Ojos named a new street after him, and in 2015 he was awarded the title of Encomienda de la Orden de Isabel la Católica by King Felipe VI of Spain for his services to Spanish culture. In 2016, he was elected a Corresponding Fellow of the Real Academia Española and the Real Academia de la Historia.

His monographs include a major study in Spanish of the Moriscos of the Campo de Calatrava in Spain (2007), a history of the printing of the ‘Rimas’ by Lupercio and Bartolomé Leonardo de Argensola (2010), a study of Diego de Silva y Mendoza, Count of Salinas (2011), and an edition in Spanish of the travel diaries of Elizabeth Lady Holland and the novelist George Eliot, who both visited Spain in the nineteenth century (2012). Other books include the letters memorials of the Count of Salinas (Marcial Pons-CEEH, 2015), an edition of the Count’s unedited poetry based on the autograph originals (Real Academia Española, 2016), and a revised and updated second edition of his book on the Moriscos of Villarrubia de los Ojos (Iberoamericana-Vervuert.

In 2014 he published a book in English on the Moriscos of the Campo de Calatrava: Tolerance and Coexistence in Early Modern Spain (Tamesis Books); a revised edition of this work in Spanish was published by Cátedra in 2017. His latest projects included an edition of the more than 500 letters the Count of Salinas sent as Viceroy from Lisbon between 1617 and 1622, as well as editing a volume of studies on Islamic Culture in Spain to 1614 by L. P. Harvey (former Professor of Spanish at Queen Mary).

Trevor will be remembered as an exceptional scholar and energetic scholar. Our thoughts are with his family at this time.

[this obituary is adapted from one published by Queen Mary, where Trevor taught for many years: https://www.qmul.ac.uk/sllf/news/stories/remembering-trevor-dadson.html%5D

 

Book launch for ‘Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation’, Courtauld Institute of Art, 12th February, 6.30-8pm

Please join us for the launch of Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation, eds Tom Nickson and Nicola Jennings: https://courtauld.ac.uk/event/gothic-architecture-in-spain-invention-and-imitation-book-launch 

6.30pm, Research Forum South Room, Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, London WC1X 9EW

From the dazzling spectacle of Burgos Cathedral to the cavernous nave of Palma Cathedral or the lacy splendour of San Juan de los Reyes, Spain preserves a remarkable variety of inventive but little understood Gothic buildings. Yet Gothic architecture in Spain and the Spanish kingdoms has traditionally been assessed in terms of its imitation of northern European architecture, dismissed for its ‘old-fashioned’ or provincial quality, and condemned for its passive receptivity to ‘Islamic influence’. But did imitation really triumph over invention in the architecture of medieval Iberia? Are the two incompatible? Can inventio and imitatio offer useful or valid analytical tools for understanding Gothic architecture? And to what extent are invention or imitation determined by patrons, architects, materials or technologies? This essay collection brings together leading scholars to examine Gothic architecture from across Iberia from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century, and provides the first significant account of Spanish Gothic architecture to be published in English since 1865.

The launch directly follows a Medieval Work-in-Progress Seminar by Beate Fricke, ‘Colour and Chaos’, starting at 5pm in the same room. Attendance is free and all are welcome to attend. Details here: https://courtauld.ac.uk/event/colour-and-chaos