Tag Archives: History

Symposium: Khipus: Writing Histories In and From Knots, The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Book Prize Symposium, Bard Graduate Center, New York, 1 February 2019

khipuimage.jpg,660x660

Khipu RN9027, from the Casa del Kipu deposit at Pachacamac; courtesy of Denise Pozzi-Escot, director, Pachacamac site museum; photograph by Rommel Angeles.

There has been much concern and criticism in the West over the absence of the voices of “peoples without history” in the writing of local, regional, and global histories. This concern has been especially profound insofar as it pertains to societies that did not have in the past, or that do not have today, their own traditions of written history. The Inkas of the Pre-Columbian Andes represent a striking case study in this regard, because, while Inka administrators had the use of an exceptionally complex and highly efficient instrument for record keeping, in the knotted-string khipu (or quipu, “knot”), we have not to date been able to draw historical information from these knotted records for writing a history of the Inka Empire. Gary Urton’s recently published book, Inka History in Knots: Reading Khipus as Primary Sources (Univ. of Texas Press, 2017), lays out a methodology for approaching khipu accounts as sources for writing Annales-style histories of the Inka state—i.e., histories based on administrative data, such as censuses, tribute records, storehouse accounts, etc. This symposium brings together eight Andean scholars to discuss and debate the question of whether or not, and if so how, we might draw on knotted cord accounts from the pre-Inka Wari, the Inka empire, and those from Andean subjects of the Spanish Colonial state in order to begin to understand how Andean peoples constructed representations of their own societies. The principal challenges will be, first, to identify the structures, physical features, organizational principles, and semiotic properties of cord accounts in these different periods in the Andean past, and second, to determine how we might draw on these constructions to begin to write histories of Andean societies based on Andean sources.

Programme:

9:30 am
Peter N. Miller
Bard Graduate Center
Welcome
Gary Urton
Harvard University
Introduction

9:50 am
Gary Urton
Harvard University
Finding Time for History in the Inka Khipus

10:30 am
Jeffrey C. Splitstoser
George Washington University
The Large Wari Khipu at Dumbarton Oaks

11:10 am
Coffee Break

11:30 am
Jon Clindaniel
Harvard University
Towards an Understanding of Non-numerical Inka Khipu Semiosis: Implications for the Interpretation of Inka History Using Primary Sources

12:10 pm
Bruce Mannheim
University of Michigan
Three Commensuration Problems in Interpreting Khipus

12:50 pm
Lunch Break

2 pm
Terence N. D’Altroy
Columbia University
The Dynamic Formation of Imperial Knowledge

2:40 pm
Sabine Hyland
University of St Andrews
“These Are Our Khipus!” The Ritual Khipu Boards of Casta, Peru

3:20 pm
Coffee Break

3:40 pm
José Carlos de la Puente Luna
Texas State University
Khipus as Legal Archives: Tribute, Justice, and Controlled Translation in Early Colonial Peru

4:20 pm
Frank Salomon
University of Wisconsin–Madison
The Long Afterlives of Central-Peruvian Khipu Patrimonies

5 pm
Panel Discussion

5:40 pm
Reception

Click here for more information

Advertisements

ARTES Members’ Visit to the Año Murillo in Seville (30 November – 2 December 2018)

murillo

ARTES have organised a trip to Seville for members from 30th November to 2nd December 2018, the main aim being a curator-led tour of the exhibition Murillo IV Centenario, opening that week, as well as visits to the Cathedral, Hospital de los Venerables and de la Caridad, Alcázar, Casa de Pilatos and other sites of art historical significance.

Members must make their own travel and accommodation arrangements but should plan to arrive by Friday evening. A full programme (from Friday night to Sunday early evening) will be posted nearer the time.

murilloII

 ARTES members wishing to join the trip should RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com.    Places will be limited to 15 and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis.*

*We may ask for a deposit to secure a place with the money put towards the cost of dinner on Saturday night.


Images: Moses Striking the Rock at Horeb, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

Jesus Multiplies the Loaves and Fishes, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

ARTES Members’ Visit to the Año Murillo in Seville (30 November – 2 December 2018)

murillo

ARTES have organised a trip to Seville for members from 30th November to 2nd December 2018, the main aim being a curator-led tour of the exhibition Murillo IV Centenario, opening that week, as well as visits to the Cathedral, Hospital de los Venerables and de la Caridad, Alcázar, Casa de Pilatos and other sites of art historical significance.

Members must make their own travel and accommodation arrangements but should plan to arrive by Friday evening. A full programme (from Friday night to Sunday early evening) will be posted nearer the time.

murilloII

 ARTES members wishing to join the trip should RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com.    Places will be limited to 15 and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis.*

*We may ask for a deposit to secure a place with the money put towards the cost of dinner on Saturday night.


Images: Moses Striking the Rock at Horeb, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

Jesus Multiplies the Loaves and Fishes, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

Conference: Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain, Edinburgh College of Art, October 26, 2018

image001

Photomontage by Jean Harold, sent to Picasso by Jean Cocteau and captioned, on the back: by “Picasso – Negro period”

This international symposium opens up discussion of Spanish art and culture in relation to the construction of discourses of coloniality in 20th-century Spain, especially in the Francoist period.

It attempts to identify methodological approaches that would allow us to understand the consolidation of hegemonic colonial discourses and how they continue in Spain today. This examination involves an analysis of constructs of Otherness in two directions – inwards and outwards. On the one hand, how did artists, performers, writers, or other cultural brokers, based in Spain, exoticise other cultures as well as their own culture as part of official rhetoric (e.g. state-funded exhibitions relating to colonial territories in Africa; translations of Chinese texts/images, state administration of rural Spain). On the other hand, the analysis is concerned with Spanish (self-)representation as Other within international contexts (eg. Picasso in African attire; flamenco in imagery for tourism/political campaigns; Hispanic Studies as a political contestation to the dictatorship).

Organisation: María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya) of the R&D Research Group “Experiences of the Political in Francoist Spain” (MINECO) with Claudia Hopkins in the School of History of Art, University of Edinburgh.

Schedule

9am – 9.30am: Registration

9.30am – 10am: Welcome and introduction, Yayo Aznar (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia) and María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

10am – 1pm: Panel 1:  Appropriating the exotic, Chair: Paloma Gay-Blasco (University of St Andrews)

  • 10am – 10.30am: Neil Cox (University of Edinburgh), [Talk on Picasso – title tbc]
  • 10.30am – 11am: Esther Planas (University of the Arts London), Dissociative Fugue Disorder. Auto-exoticism as bio politics: Ways of questioning the production of culture during Francoism
  • 11am – 11.15am: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 11.15am – 11.45am: Francisco Aix (Universidad de Sevilla), Flamenco as a means to identity. An Andalusian perspective
  • 11.45am – 12.15pm: Alicia Fuentes Vega (Universidad Complutense Madrid), Title to be confirmed  
  • 12.15pm – 1pm: Panel discussion

2pm – 5pm: Panel 2: On the meaning of colony in Francoism, Chair: Richard Williams (University of Edinburgh)

  • 2pm – 2.30pm: Helena Miguélez-Carballeira (Bangor University), The Spanish rural subject and the Instituto Nacional de Colonización (1939-1971): A Biopolitical Perspective
  • 2.30pm – 3pm: Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh), The Dream of a Spanish-Moroccan Brotherhood. Art and Exhibitions, 1936-1956
  • 3pm – 3.15pm: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 3.15pm – 3.45pm: Carles Prado Pons (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya). A triangulated alterity: China in Spain, 1880-1930
  • 3.45pm – 4.15pm: José Saval (University of Edinburgh). Latin American Boom or Boomerang: the impact of the periphery in the metropolis.
  • 4.15pm – 5pm: Panel discussion and closing remarks

Free to attend, booking required. Click here to reserve a ticket. 

Click here for more information.

ARTES Members’ Visit to the Año Murillo in Seville (30 November – 2 December 2018)

murillo

ARTES have organised a trip to Seville for members from 30th November to 2nd December 2018, the main aim being a curator-led tour of the exhibition Murillo IV Centenario, opening that week, as well as visits to the Cathedral, Hospital de los Venerables and de la Caridad, Alcázar, Casa de Pilatos and other sites of art historical significance.

Members must make their own travel and accommodation arrangements but should plan to arrive by Friday evening. A full programme (from Friday night to Sunday early evening) will be posted nearer the time.

murilloII

 ARTES members wishing to join the trip should RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com.    Places will be limited to 15 and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis.*

*We may ask for a deposit to secure a place with the money put towards the cost of dinner on Saturday night.


Images: Moses Striking the Rock at Horeb, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

Jesus Multiplies the Loaves and Fishes, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

ARTES AGM and Prize-Giving Ceremony Report, Oxford, 14 June 2018

home2On 14 June 2018 ARTES held its AGM and prize-giving ceremony in Oxford. It was a day packed with special visits to rarely-seen collections of Spanish art in the city. The day started at Campion Hall, a Jesuit private hall which hosts a fascinating private collection of religious art from Europe, Latin America, and from Christian missions elsewhere in the world.

The visit was followed by the group’s annual general meeting and prize-giving ceremony, held at the Taylorian, Oxford University’s centre for the study of Modern European languages and literatures. Artes presented the following prizes:

IMG_0485

Artes’ honorary president, Sir John Elliott (Regius Professor Emeritus, University of Oxford) with some of the prize winners

The Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal
Awarded to Javier Vicente Arenas (MA Student, Warburg Institute, London), for his essay titled Constructing a ‘Transmediterranean’ Identity: Rodrigo de Borgia’s Italian Angels in Valencia Cathedral (1472-81)

Prizes were also presented to two runners-up: Jamie Haskell (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay titled The Hispano-Moresque Haggadah and Helena Haugli (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay The Botella de Astorga Reliquary and the Transfer, Functions, and Meanings of a Fatimid Rock Crystal in Remote Christian Spain. 

ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholarships

Travel scholarships were awarded to:

Susy Oram, who will travel to Mexico to study Mudéjar art and architecture in the region during the viceregal period.

 

Danielle Smith, CEEH/David Wilkie Scholar for the Study of Spanish Art at the University of Edinburgh, who will travel to Madrid to carry out research for her PhD dissertation, titled ‘Colecciones de Trajes de España: exploring sartorial representation in Spanish printed books, 1777-1825′
Elizabeth Chant, a PhD candidate at the School of European Languages, Cultures, and Society, UCL, who will travel to Seville and Madrid to research ‘Illuminating the Map: Spanish Enlightenment Cartography of the Costa Patagónica
Stefanie Lenk, a curator and PhD candidate at the University of Oxford, who is studying the re-use of Roman altars in paleochristian and Visigothic churches in Spain.
 
This scholarship was awarded to Sylvia Alvares-Correa, who is working on a PhD titled ‘From Flanders to Portugal: the transmission of northern art, artists, and techniques to Portugal through the collection of Rainha Dona Leonor’s (1458-1525)’ at the university of Oxford.

IMG_0490

The day continued with a visit to Magdalen College, founded by William Waynflete in 1458. The College holds wide-ranging art collections, including a Spanish altarpiece representing  Christ Carrying the Cross in the College Chapel. Previously attributed to Valdés Leal, the work, which remains unstudied, was more likely produced by another Sevillian painter in seventeenth century.

Featured Exhibition: Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, until 22 July 2018

p05k41y3

Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (Mexican, 1713–1772). Portrait of Doña Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas (detail), c. 1762. Galería Coloniart, Collection of Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andrés Siegel, Mexico City. Photo © Rafael Doniz

The vitality and inventiveness of artists in eighteenth-century New Spain (Mexico) is the focus of Pinxit Mexici, an exhibition which presents some 110 works of art (primarily paintings), many of which are unpublished and newly restored. The exhibition surveys the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlights the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. It is the first major exhibition devoted to this neglected topic.

The exhibition is divided in thematic sections: Great Masters; Masters Storytellers and the Art of Expression; Noble Pursuits and the Academy; Paintings of the Land; The Power of Portraiture; The Allegorical World; Imagining the Sacred.

Click here to find out more.