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Programme and Registration Details: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, 20th–21st June 2019, Senate Suite, Durham University Castle, Durham, UK


Organised by Stefano Cracolici and Edward Payne (Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, Durham University)

Free, but please register at this link: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/canons-and-repertoires-constructing-the-visual-arts-in-the-hispanic-world-registration-62569293441

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers will challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers will also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers will address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules.

PROGRAMME

Thursday 20 June 2019

09.30 – 10.00 Registration & Coffee
10.00 – 10.05Introduction & Welcome
10.05 – 11.20 Session 1: Historiographies
Chair: Stefano Cracolici (Durham University)
10.05 – 10.25 Why El Greco to Goya?
Edward Payne (Durham University)
10.25 – 10.45Frederic Leighton’s Vision of Spain
Véronique Gerard Powell (Sorbonne Université, Paris)
10.45 – 11.05  Nigel Glendinning and the Hispanic Research Journal: A Unique Voice in Spanish Cultural
History
Sarah Symmons (University of Essex)
11.05 – 11.20 Discussion
11.20 – 11.50 Tea & Coffee
11.50 – 12.50 Keynote Lecture:
Passion and Prejudice: Attitudes to Spanish Sculpture in Nineteenth-Century Britain
Holly Trusted (Victoria & Albert Museum, London)
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 15.15 Session 2: Geographies
Chair: Edward Payne (Durham University)
14.00 – 14.20 Beyond El Greco: The Travelling Artist between Italy and Spain—Artistic Translation and the
Sixteenth-Century Hispanic Canon
Piers Baker-Bates (The Open University)
14.20 – 14.40Maestros españoles en Chile: Espacios y repertorios
Marcela Drien (Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Santiago de Chile)
14.40 – 15.00 Geographic Limits and the History of the Spanish Avant-Garde
Maite Barragán (Albright College, Reading PA)
15.00 – 15.15 Discussion
15.15 – 16.30Session 3: Strategies
Chair: Tom Stammers (Durham University)
15.15 – 15.35Genaro Pérez Villaamil: Navigating Stereotypes
Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh)
15.35 – 15.55 Imaginary Architecture as Imagined Community: ‘The Market’ by Jenaro Pérez Villaamil
Matilde Mateo (Syracuse University)
15.55 – 16.15 Hieroglyphs of Providence: Pelegrín Clavé and Isabella I of Castile
Stefano Cracolici (Durham University)
16.15 – 16.30 Discussion
16.30 – 17.00 Tea & Coffee
17.00 – 18.00 Keynote Lecture
Canons and Repertoires in Hispanic Art: What does Stirling Maxwell have to do with them?
Hilary Macartney (University of Glasgow)

Friday 21 June 2019

9.30 – 10.00 Tea & Coffee
10.00 – 11.15 Session 4: Identities
Chair: Giovanna Capitelli (Università Roma Tre)
10.00 – 10.20 El arte español más allá de la península ibérica: ¿Qué significa ser un ‘artista español en la Nueva España’?
Luis Javier Cuesta Hernández (Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México)
10.20 – 10.40 Constructing the Monuments of the Nation: Victor Balaguer and the Struggle to Shape Monasteries as Spanishness
Josep-Maria Garcia-Fuentes (Newcastle University)
10.40 – 11.00 Thinking Spain from Barcelona: The Iconographic Repertoire of Spanish Art (1918–1922)
Lucila Mallart (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
11.00 – 11.15 Discussion
11.15 – 11.45Tea & Coffee
11.45 – 13.00Session 5: Remediations
Chair: Ludmilla Jordanova (Durham University)
11.45 – 12.05 Thinking through Painting: Artistic Practice as Metaphor in the Early Modern Hispanic World
Adam Jasienski (Southern Methodist University, Dallas TX)
12.05 – 12.25 From Mimesis to Montage: Sergei Eisenstein on El Greco
Dušan Radunović (Durham University)
12.25 – 12.45 ‘Ese Velázquez sí que era un genio’: el canon del arte español y la ficción televisiva
Luis Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez (Universitat de València)
12.45 – 13.00 Discussion
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 14.20Concluding Remarks
Amaya Alzaga Ruiz (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid)
14.20 – 15.00 Roundtable Discussion
15.00 – 16.00 Refreshment

Specialist Workshop: “Golden Age Art and Globalization in Madrid’s Museums”, Madrid, Spain, September 2–12, 2019

Specialist Workshop “Golden Age Art and Globalization in Madrid’s Museums”
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, September 2–12 2019
Deadline for applications: Jun 2, 2019

Many of the objects that are admired today in Spain’s major museums arrived here in the Early Modern period. Collections of art,  
artifacts, and objects—everythig from paintings and sculptures to armor, textiles, feathers, books, exotic shells and even animal horns transmitted a variety of meanings, many of which are lost to the average museum visitor today.

Understanding these objects (their origins, how they arrived and how they were seen) introduces students to a deeper appreciation of how Spanish history and identity has been and is created in relationship with the rest of the world, and especially with Spanish-speaking  America and Asia.  The course will explore these issues using ten selected objects that will provide a view of early globalization focusing on questions raised by the objects themselves.  One of the topics to analyze will be the relationship of art to diplomacy, seeking to shed light on the value of paintings of distant places, peoples and animals as “proof” or “document” in the age before photography, or the place of “the others” (non-Europeans) in the history of Spanish and European societies in general, both in the past and in today’s globalized and multicultural world.  Attention will also be paid to questions such as commerce, consumption, religion, and  gender in a world of travelling objects and persons, always with an emphasis on elucidating how these travels created new meanings for objects in new contexts.

This course has a practical, object-based character, with practically all of the sessions taking place in museums, libraries and other collections in Madrid and its surroundings.  Presentations and discussions will take place in fromt of the objects themselves.  This experience will help students to work with objects and to be aware of the material aspects of globalization, further from what is expressed in academic texts and articles. It is expected too that all will feel  something of the fascination and intrigue experienced by contemporaries who saw these things for the first time.

For further details and inscriptions:  
http://formacioncontinua.uam.es/33421/detail/golden-age-art-and-globalization-in-madrids-museums.html

For enquiries, please contact:
mcruz.decarlos@uam.es / elena.alcala@uam.es / isabel.cervera@uam.es

Velázquez at Kingston Lacy: Lecture by Dr Gabriele Finaldi, 21 July

Philip IV hunting Wild Boar (La Tela Real)
Diego Velázquez, Philip IV hunting Wild Boar (La Tela Real), probably 1632-7, oil on canvas, 182 x 302 cm. The National Gallery, London, inventory no. NG197

A unique landscape by artist Diego Velázquez, painted for King Philip IV of Spain, is on loan from the National Gallery in London for the first time, and is exhibited at the National Trust’s Kingston Lacy in Dorset.
La Tela Real takes pride of place in the dining room, while Kingston Lacy’s The Judgement of Solomon by Sebastiano del Piombo is on loan to the National Gallery, where it joined a major exhibition charting Sebastiano’s extraordinary friendship with Michelangelo, master of the Italian High Renaissance.

La Tela Real is a landscape scene depicting a type of boar hunt, staged by the Spanish kings on feast days and to honour special guests. The quarry was hunted within a canvas (tela) enclosure (so giving the name La Tela Real, i.e. ‘The Royal Enclosure’). Owing to the tremendous expense and labour involved, only the king could afford such a spectacle.
Identifiable figures include Philip IV, in the right mid-ground, meeting the charge of the boar. Immediately to his left is the powerful Count-Duke of Olivares (first minister to the king) and beyond him most likely the Infante Don Carlos, Philip’s brother. The king’s first wife, Isabella of Bourbon, watches the events from the comfort and safety of one of the carriages inside the enclosure.

La Tela Real is exceptional amongst Velázquez’s body of work. An extremely rare and individual landscape, it was designed around 1636-8 for The Torre de la Parada, Philip IV’s hunting lodge near Madrid. At Kingston Lacey it will be possible to enjoy an intimate encounter with this artwork, similar to that enjoyed by the king and his court in its original private, royal setting.

Moreover, it will be possible to enjoy the painting together with Kingston Lacy’s remarkable collection of Spanish paintings, assembled by William John Bankes and proudly displayed in his opulent ‘Spanish Room’. The finest works include Velázquez’s portrait of Cardinal Camillo Massimi, and a near-contemporary copy of the artist’s Las Meninas, one of the most enigmatic and famous images in the history of Western art.

To reveal the story of La Tela Real and the fascinating associations with Kingston Lacy’s own outstanding collections, Dr Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery,  will give a lecture  looking at Velázquez as an artist along with the history surrounding Philip IV of Spain and the art of boar hunting.

The lecture will take place on 21 July. Tickets are £12 per person, with a welcome drink from 6.30pm, time to explore the state rooms at Kingston Lacy, before the lectures start at 7pm.

Tickets must be booked in advance on 0344 249 1895 or online.
Visitors can see La Tela Real on display until September. The house at Kingston Lacy opens via a timed ticket system. Tickets can be booked online.