Tag Archives: The National Gallery

News: the National Gallery acquires a still life by Juan de Zurbarán

n-6669_432pxThe National Gallery, London, has recently acquired Still Life with Lemons, Lilies, Carnations, Roses and a Lemon Blossom in a Wicker Basket, the first work by Juan de Zurbarán to enter a public collection in the UK. On display at the Gallery since 25 April 2018, the work was painted in about 1643–49 by the son of leading Golden Age artist Francisco de Zurbarán. Long overshadowed by his father, Juan was a skilled still life painter documented in Seville between 1620 and 1649. Works by his hand are extremely rare as his career was cut short at 29 by the plague which halved the city’s population.

 

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Job: Curatorial Fellow in Spanish Paintings, The National Gallery, London

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Diego Velázquez, The Toilet of Venus (‘The Rokeby Venus’)
1647-51, The National Gallery, London

Department: Curatorial
 

Salary: £26,126 – £32,734
Type: Fixed Term Full-Time
Closing date: 25 April 2018
Interview date:16th May 2018

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This is a new curatorial position at The National Gallery generously supported by Centro de Estudios Europa
Hispanica (CEEH).

This post is a 22 month traineeship for a candidate with a scholarly background in European paintings and a special interest in Spanish paintings, who wishes to pursue a museum career. The Curatorial Fellow will have the opportunity to be involved in a full range of curatorial activities, including special projects, with a particular focus on Spanish paintings from 1450 to post-1800.

Click here to apply

Velázquez at Kingston Lacy: Lecture by Dr Gabriele Finaldi, 21 July

Philip IV hunting Wild Boar (La Tela Real)
Diego Velázquez, Philip IV hunting Wild Boar (La Tela Real), probably 1632-7, oil on canvas, 182 x 302 cm. The National Gallery, London, inventory no. NG197

A unique landscape by artist Diego Velázquez, painted for King Philip IV of Spain, is on loan from the National Gallery in London for the first time, and is exhibited at the National Trust’s Kingston Lacy in Dorset.
La Tela Real takes pride of place in the dining room, while Kingston Lacy’s The Judgement of Solomon by Sebastiano del Piombo is on loan to the National Gallery, where it joined a major exhibition charting Sebastiano’s extraordinary friendship with Michelangelo, master of the Italian High Renaissance.

La Tela Real is a landscape scene depicting a type of boar hunt, staged by the Spanish kings on feast days and to honour special guests. The quarry was hunted within a canvas (tela) enclosure (so giving the name La Tela Real, i.e. ‘The Royal Enclosure’). Owing to the tremendous expense and labour involved, only the king could afford such a spectacle.
Identifiable figures include Philip IV, in the right mid-ground, meeting the charge of the boar. Immediately to his left is the powerful Count-Duke of Olivares (first minister to the king) and beyond him most likely the Infante Don Carlos, Philip’s brother. The king’s first wife, Isabella of Bourbon, watches the events from the comfort and safety of one of the carriages inside the enclosure.

La Tela Real is exceptional amongst Velázquez’s body of work. An extremely rare and individual landscape, it was designed around 1636-8 for The Torre de la Parada, Philip IV’s hunting lodge near Madrid. At Kingston Lacey it will be possible to enjoy an intimate encounter with this artwork, similar to that enjoyed by the king and his court in its original private, royal setting.

Moreover, it will be possible to enjoy the painting together with Kingston Lacy’s remarkable collection of Spanish paintings, assembled by William John Bankes and proudly displayed in his opulent ‘Spanish Room’. The finest works include Velázquez’s portrait of Cardinal Camillo Massimi, and a near-contemporary copy of the artist’s Las Meninas, one of the most enigmatic and famous images in the history of Western art.

To reveal the story of La Tela Real and the fascinating associations with Kingston Lacy’s own outstanding collections, Dr Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery,  will give a lecture  looking at Velázquez as an artist along with the history surrounding Philip IV of Spain and the art of boar hunting.

The lecture will take place on 21 July. Tickets are £12 per person, with a welcome drink from 6.30pm, time to explore the state rooms at Kingston Lacy, before the lectures start at 7pm.

Tickets must be booked in advance on 0344 249 1895 or online.
Visitors can see La Tela Real on display until September. The house at Kingston Lacy opens via a timed ticket system. Tickets can be booked online.

GOYA PORTRAITS – THE NATIONAL GALLERY LONDON – LUNCHTIME TALKS

EXHIBITION EVENTS

GOYA THE PORTRAITS

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The National Gallery, Sainsbury Wing Theatre

Lunchtime Talks – Free, no booking
Courses – £14/£12 concession/£10 members

October-December 2015

1.00-1.45pm

OCTOBER

Francisco de Goya, The Duchess of Alba (detail), 1797. © Courtesy of The Hispanic Society of America, New York

Lunchtime talk
Thursday 29 October 
Goya & the Duchess of Alba
Marcus B. Burke
Senior Curator, Museum Department, The Hispanic Society of America, New York

NOVEMBER

Course (Sainsbury Wing Theatre)
Thursday 12 November

11am-1pm
Fashioning identity
Tutor: Aileen Ribeiro
£14/£12 concessions/£10 members
Professor Aileen Ribeiro of the Courtauld Institute of Art explores themes of costume and national identity in Spain, England and France during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Altamira

Lunchtime talk
Monday 16 November
The Altamira Family, Goya and Portraiture
Xavier Salomon
Chief curator, The Frick Collection, New York

Study day
Saturday 21 November
11am-3.30pm
Sainsbury Wing Theatre
Subversive portraits: Goya and his legacy
Speakers: Juliet Wilson Bareau, Emma Barker, Xavier Bray, Gill Perry and Yinka Shonibare
£25/£14 concessions/£10 members and OU students
Explore portraits by Goya and other artists in the context of Napoleonic Europe, and discover why Goya has been such a key figure for modern and contemporary artists from Manet to Jake and Dinos Chapman. Held in collaboration with the Open University.

Lunchtime talk
Monday 30 November
Public faces, private views: Goya’s letters and the problem of portraiture
Sarah Symmons
Visiting Fellow, University of Essex

DECEMBER

godoy
Monday 7 December
Goya’s patron: Manuel Godoy
Isadora Rose-de Viejo

Monday 21 December
Painted Cloth: Goya and Dress
Jacqui Ansell

ARTES Visit – Exhibition – El Greco at the National Gallery – 18 June 2015

ARTES Members Private Visit

EL GRECO Adoration in the Name of Jesus

The National Gallery London 

El Greco at the National Gallery

Thursday 18 June 2015

8.50 am – 10.00 am (meeting at West Entrance)

This visit is at the kind invitation of Curator Letizia Treves of the National Gallery will be talking about the El Greco display. She will be joined by Xavier Bray from the Dulwich Picture Gallery will be talking about El Greco’s interest in sculpture and by Véronique Gerard Powell will be talking about the Louvre Crucifixion.

Please note, numbers for this event are limited. If you would like to attend or are interested in membership , please contact Morlin at artesiberia@gmail.com . While this visit is free for ARTES members, there will be a charge for guests.

Gabriele Finaldi, National Gallery, London

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Gabriele Finaldi to take up his new position as Director of the National Gallery, London, on 17 August 2015.
Dr Finaldi, a British citizen, is currently Deputy Director for Collections and Research at the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid where he has been since 2002. He was formerly a curator at the National Gallery, London, between 1992 and 2002, where he was responsible for the later Italian paintings in the collection and also the Spanish collection.

Exhibition: Goya portraits: National Gallery, London

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Forthcoming exhibition:
Goya Portraits
National Gallery, London
Wed 7 October 2015 – Sun 10 January 2016

The first exhibition in the UK to focus solely on Goya’s portraits. It will look at a wide range of works across his career, from official commissions depicting monarchs and generals through to informal images capturing close friends and colleagues. Among them, court servants in Madrid,such as Andrés del Peral (c.1797), who was appointed guilder to the court of Charles III in 1785, only a year before Goya’s own appointment as court painter. The exhibition will present new research on the artist and sitters by its curator Xavier Bray, Chief Curator, Dulwich Picture Gallery and ARTES member.