Tag Archives: Francisco Goya

Madrid’s Palacio de Liria to Become a Museum

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish, 1746-1828), The Duchess of Alba in White, 1795. Oil on canvas. Colección Duques de Alba


As reported by El País and other Spanish newspapers, the Liria Palace, residence of the Dukes of Alba and home to Spain’s most important private collection, is being transformed into a museum and will soon open to the public every day of the week.

Touring from Madrid to Dallas, the recent exhibition Treasures from the House of Alba: 500 Years of Art and Collecting (Meadows Museum, 2015–16) has familiarised the public with masterpieces from this unparalleled collection. Yet the opening of a museum in the Liria Palace will allow visitors to experience the artworks in the spaces for which they were commissioned and collected.

Unlike such nearby collections as the Cerralbo o Lázaro Galdiano, the palace will continue to function as a residence. Works will be displayed according to the wishes of the last duchess of Alba, Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart y de Silva (1926–2014), who oversaw the partial opening of the palace to the public in 1975.

The museum’s opening date has not yet been announced.

Featured Exhibition: Prints of Darkness: Goya and Hogarth in a Time of European Turmoil, Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester, until August 2019

Goya-and-Hogarth_the-Whitworth_web_medFrancesco José de Goya Lucientes (1746-1828) and William Hogarth (1647-1764) were the most remarkable artists of their times. Both were famous painters, but their most compelling works are the prints that they made and published themselves. Often produced in serial format, like graphic novels, the prints were aimed at a more popular market than their paintings. This is the first exhibition to show Goya and Hogarth’s works together. It features a hundred prints, selected from the stellar collections of the Whitworth and the Manchester Art Gallery, and provides a unique opportunity to compare their extraordinary graphic work.

Both outsiders, Hogarth and Goya cast their candid gazes on their dysfunctional societies. Poverty, homelessness, warfare, violence, cruelty, sexual abuse and human trafficking, social inequity, political corruption, racism, superstition, hypocrisy, rampant materialism, nationalism, mental illness, and alcoholism all were subjected to their forensic scrutiny —no topic was off-limits. These challenging prints provoke a spectrum of responses, including shock, discomfort, laughter, pleasure, pain and empathy. The scenarios that Goya and Hogarth unflinchingly depicted are startlingly familiar to the contemporary viewer, and the images provoke us to turn our embarrassed gazes on our own society, and ourselves.

The exhibition is also timely, as it takes place during the troubled run-up to Britain’s exit from the European Union. Hogarth and Goya both lived through extended periods of warfare with France, and Hogarth claimed to hate the French, although he was a frequent visitor to Paris and hired French engravers for his print series Marriage a-la Mode. Angry, troubled, and ambivalent, Hogarth seems to embody the tortured mind-set of Britain on the eve of Brexit.

Click here for more information.

Exhibition: Goya portraits: National Gallery, London

2015-02-GoyaSelfPort
Forthcoming exhibition:
Goya Portraits
National Gallery, London
Wed 7 October 2015 – Sun 10 January 2016

The first exhibition in the UK to focus solely on Goya’s portraits. It will look at a wide range of works across his career, from official commissions depicting monarchs and generals through to informal images capturing close friends and colleagues. Among them, court servants in Madrid,such as Andrés del Peral (c.1797), who was appointed guilder to the court of Charles III in 1785, only a year before Goya’s own appointment as court painter. The exhibition will present new research on the artist and sitters by its curator Xavier Bray, Chief Curator, Dulwich Picture Gallery and ARTES member.

2015-02-Goya-TapestryCartoons
Goya in Madrid. The Tapestry Cartoons 1775-1794
Prado Museum, Madrid
28 November 2014 – 3 May 2015

Curators: Manuela Mena, Head Curator of the Goya and 18th Century Art Department, and Gudrun Maurer, Curator of the Goya and 18th Century Painting Department at the Museo del Prado

The exhibition of over 140 works proposes a new approach to Goya’s tapestry cartoons by treating them as illustrating the artist’s thought processes and development at the beginning of his career. Cartoons are shown alongside the tapestries for which they were made in the Escorial and Pardo palaces. They are compared  with the work of contemporaneous and historic artists to illustrate Goya’s sources and inspiration.

Goya’s War: Los desastres de la guerra: Colorado State Art Museum, Fort Collins

2015-02-Goya-Desastres
Goya’s War: Los desastres de la guerra Colorado State Art Museum, Fort Collins.

A collaboration of the Pomona College Museum of Art and the University Museums of the University of Delaware.

Curated by Janis Tomlinson, Director, University Museums, and circulated by the Pomona College Museum of Art.
Exhibition closes 4 APril 2015

Goya: Order and Disorder, Boston: Exhibition closes 19 January 2015

2015-01-Goya-OrderAndDisorder-MFA
Goya: Order and Disorder, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Exhibition closes 19 January 2015.
exhibition dedicated to Spanish master Francisco Goya (1746–1828).
The largest retrospective of the artist to take place in America in 25 years, this exhibition features 170 paintings, prints and drawings. It includes many loans from Europe and the US, including 21 works from the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, along with loans from the Musée du Louvre, the Galleria degli Uffizi, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art (Washington) and private collections. Also on display are some 60 works from the MFA’s collection of Goya’s works on paper.
The exhibition catalogue includes texts by Stephanie Loeb Stepanek, Frederick Ilchman, Janis A. Tomlinson, Clifford S. Ackley, Jane E. Braun, Manuela B. Mena Marqués, Gudrun Maurer, Elisabetta Polidori, Sue W. Reed, Benjamin Weiss, Juliet Wilson-Bareau.

Exhibition: Dibujos españoles en la Hamburger Kunsthalle, Prado, Madrid

2014-11-DibujosEsp-HambKunsthalle2014-11-SpanishDwgsHamb-KunsthalleSpanish Drawings from the Hamburger Kunsthalle: Cano, Murillo and Goya, Museo del Prado, 30 October 2014 – 8 February 2015.
Previously on display as The Grand Gesture: Drawings from Murillo to Goya from the Hamburger Kunsthalle, at the Meadows Museum, Dallas, this exhibition has moved to the  Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid.
A significant percentage of the collection, acquired for the Kunsthalle’s Kupferstichkabinett  (Department of Prints, Drawings and Photography) by its first Director, Alfred Lichtwark (1852-1914), is on view.
The exhibition is accompanied by a complete catalogue of all the drawings in the collection, written by Jens Hoffman-Samland with the collaboration of María Cruz de Carlos Varona, Gabriele Fialdi, José Manuel Matilla, Manuela Mena and Gloria Solache, curators at the Museo del Prado.
The exhibition has been co-organized by the Meadows Museum, SMU; the Museo Nacional del Prado; the Hamburger Kunsthalle; the Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica; and the Center for Spain in America.