Tag Archives: Collecting

Symposium: ‘Collecting Murillo in Britain and Ireland,’ The Wallace Collection, London, 14 May 2018

 

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Bartolomé-Esteban Murillo, The Marriage of the Virgin, c.1660-1670, The Wallace Collection

‘Oh wonderful Spain. Think of this romantic land covered in Moorish ruins and full of Murillos’

Benjamin Disraeli’s 1830 letter attests to the prominence of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo in the minds British travellers and collectors. In celebration of the 400thanniversary of Murillo’s birth, the Wallace Collection, in collaboration with the Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica, will be exploring this further by hosting an international one-day symposium on 14th May 2018 entitled ‘Collecting Murillo in Britain and Ireland’.

Speakers include Thierry Morel, Veronique Gerard Powell, Xanthe Brooke, Hugh Brigstocke, Isabelle Kent, Xavier Bray, Claudia Hopkins, Thomas Bean, Hilary Macarney and Philip McEvansoneya. We are delighted to have this group of acclaimed scholars coming together to discuss new research surrounding the collecting of Murillo in Britain and Ireland.The seminars delivered will form the basis of a new volume on the subject to be published by CEEH.

Click here to buy a ticket to the symposium

Programme

09:30 – Registration

09:50 – Welcome

Session 1) Early Displays of Works by Murillo in Britain

10:00 – Sir Robert Walpole’s Spanish Pictures. Thierry Morel (Director and Curator at Large, Hermitage Museum Foundation)

10:30 – From Lord Godolphin to John Blackwood and Lawrence Dundas: the first British purchasers of Murillo. Véronique Gerard Powell (Honorary Senior Lecturer, Sorbonne University)

11:00 – tea and coffee break

Session 2) British Collectors in Seville and Madrid

11:30 – Collecting Murillo in Seville: the case of Julian Benjamin Williams (d.1866) and Frank Hall Standish (1799-1840). Xanthe Brooke (Curator of Continental European Art, Walker Art Gallery)

12:00 – William Eden: the discovery of Murillo with his friends in Spain. Travel and collecting. Hugh Brigstocke (independent scholar)

12:30 – The curious case of General Meade (1775 – 1849): his collection in Madrid and its dissemination. Isabelle Kent (Enriqueta Harris Frankfort Curatorial Assistant, The Wallace Collection)

13:00 – Break for lunch (not included)

14:00 – William Buchanan and James Irvine: In-situ talk in the Great Gallery. Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection) and Isabelle Kent

Session 3) Artists and Scholars travellers to Spain

14:30 – ‘All softness’ – Murillo through British artists’ eyes. Claudia Hopkins (Lecturer, University of Edinburgh)

15:00 – Hand-Book for Travellers in Spain and Richard Ford. Thomas Bean (private researcher)

15:30 – Accessing Murillo: Stirling Maxwell’s contribution to scholarship, collecting and taste in Britain. Hilary Macartney (Lecturer, University of Glasgow)

Session 4) Other Major Collectors

16:00 – Collecting and displaying Murillo in Ireland. Philip McEvansoneya (Lecturer, Trinity College Dublin)

16:30 – Close

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Conference: Collecting Spain: Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain, V&A, London, 8th–9th June 2018

V&ASpanish art has been collected in the UK since the 17th century. This conference will explore collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies will be drawn from the V&A and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organized in joint sessions dealing with the same subject from Spanish and then British perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media, while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference will include poster session during the coffee breaks.

Opening remarks on the history of collecting Spanish Decorative Arts by medium: Collecting, Display & Dissemination: the changing face of the decorative arts collection at South Kensington (1852-1873), Dr Susanna Avery-Quash (Senior Research Curator, History of Collecting, National Gallery)

  • Ceramics: Lusterware:
    M. Rosser-Owen (Asian Department, V&A): Collecting Spanish lustreware by the Victoria and Albert MuseumJaume Coll (Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia): A survey and history of collecting Spanish Decorative Arts: Lusterware 
  •  Textiles:
    Ana Cabrera (Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A): Following the thread: collecting Spanish textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum Spanish case

    Silvia Carbonell (Centro de Documentación Museo Textil, Tarrasa): Textile collecting in Catalonia
  • Silver:
    Kirstin Kennedy (Metalwork Department, V&A): The Scholar, the scoundrel and the skater: How the V&A collections of Hispanic silver were formed

    Jesús Rivas (Universidad de Murcia): Collecting Spanish silverwork
  • Furniture:
    Nick Humphrey (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A): Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

    Sofía Rodríguez (Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid): Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid (1880-1920)
  • Sculpture and Plaster Cast:
    Xavier Bray (Wallace Collection): A Vogue for St Francis

    Holly Trusted (Sculpture Department, V&A): Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the profile of Spanish Art through Plaster CastsMaria Bolaños (Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid): Electrical treasuries: the Decorative Arts collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones (1881-1915)

     

  •  Fashion:
    Oriole Cullen (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A): Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

    Helena López del Hierro (Museo del Traje, Madrid): From Dress to Fashion:the collection of The Museo del Traje

  • Displaying, interpreting and conserving collections of Spanish decorative arts:
    Isabel Rodríguez (Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid): Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative AnalysisCorinna Gardner and
    Johanna Agerman Ross (Design, Architecture and Digital, V&A): 20th century Galleries at the V&A

    Lesley Miller (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion, V&A): Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries

    Victor Borges (Conservation Department, V&A): The Conservation of the Cast Courts. New discoveries on the Spanish Casts

  • Closing speaker: Dr Edward Payne (Head Curator: Spanish Art, Auckland Castle): Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland
  • Closing remarks: Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Booking required: click here

Lecture: Edward Payne (The Auckland Project), ‘In the Shadow of Louis-Philippe: Building a Spanish Gallery in County Durham,’ Visual Cultures Forum, Queen Mary University of London, 22 March 2018

Backhouse_Bank

The Backhouse Bank in Bishop Auckland, soon to re-open as the Spanish Gallery

On 22 March 2018 at 6 pm ARTES Committee Member Edward Payne will lecture on ‘In the Shadow of Louis-Philippe: Building a Spanish Gallery in County Durham,’ at the Visual Cultures Forum of Queen Mary University of London. The lecture will offer a glimpse behind the scenes of an exciting project in the North East of England. It will provide an introduction to the origins of an unusual endeavour—building a Spanish art gallery a stone’s throw away from a bishop’s palace—as well as a sneak preview of the gallery’s contents, including recent acquisitions and plans for potential loans and narratives.

To reserve a place, please click here.

Symposium: ‘Collecting Murillo in Britain and Ireland’; The Wallace Collection, London, 14 May 2018

 

exhibition_98_fullimagepath__murillo-marriage-side

Bartolomé-Esteban Murillo, The Marriage of the Virgin, c.1660-1670, The Wallace Collection

‘Oh wonderful Spain. Think of this romantic land covered in Moorish ruins and full of Murillos’

Benjamin Disraeli’s 1830 letter attests to the prominence of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo in the minds British travellers and collectors. In celebration of the 400thanniversary of Murillo’s birth, the Wallace Collection, in collaboration with the Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica, will be exploring this further by hosting an international one-day symposium on 14th May 2018 entitled ‘Collecting Murillo in Britain and Ireland’.

Speakers include Thierry Morel, Veronique Gerard Powell, Xanthe Brooke, Hugh Brigstocke, Isabelle Kent, Xavier Bray, Claudia Hopkins, Thomas Bean, Hilary Macartney and Philip McEvansoneya. We are delighted to have this group of acclaimed scholars coming together to discuss new research surrounding the collecting of Murillo in Britain and Ireland.The seminars delivered will form the basis of a new volume on the subject to be published by CEEH.

Please follow this link to buy tickets for the conference.

Programme*

09:30 – Registration

09:50 – Welcome

Session 1) Early Displays of Works by Murillo in Britain

10:00 – Sir Robert Walpole’s Spanish Pictures. Thierry Morel (Director and Curator at Large, Hermitage Museum Foundation)

10:30 – From Lord Godolphin to John Blackwood and Lawrence Dundas: the first British purchasers of Murillo. Véronique Gerard Powell (Honorary Senior Lecturer, Sorbonne University)

11:00 – tea and coffee break

Session 2) British Collectors in Seville and Madrid

11:30 – Collecting Murillo in Seville: the case of Julian Benjamin Williams (d.1866) and Frank Hall Standish (1799-1840). Xanthe Brooke (Curator of Continental European Art, Walker Art Gallery)

12:00 – William Eden: the discovery of Murillo with his friends in Spain. Travel and collecting. Hugh Brigstocke (independent scholar)

12:30 – The curious case of General Meade (1775 – 1849): his collection in Madrid and its dissemination. Isabelle Kent (Enriqueta Harris Frankfort Curatorial Assistant, The Wallace Collection)

13:00 – Break for lunch (not included)

14:00 – William Buchanan and James Irvine: In-situ talk in the Great Gallery. Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection) and Isabelle Kent

Session 3) Artists and Scholars travellers to Spain

14:30 – ‘All softness’ – Murillo through British artists’ eyes. Claudia Hopkins (Lecturer, University of Edinburgh)

15:00 – Hand-Book for Travellers in Spain and Richard Ford. Thomas Bean (private researcher)

15:30 – Accessing Murillo: Stirling Maxwell’s contribution to scholarship, collecting and taste in Britain. Hilary Macartney (Lecturer, University of Glasgow)

Session 4) Other Major Collectors

16:00 – Collecting and displaying Murillo in Ireland. Philip McEvansoneya (Lecturer, Trinity College Dublin)

16:30 – Close

Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages (6th-16th century), 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquaryCall for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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Sorolla, Dallas, San Diego and Madrid

2014-05-SorollaAndAmericaSorolla and America, Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, 13 December 2013 – 19 April 2014; touring to San Diego Museum of Art, 30 May – 26 August and finally Fundación MAPFRE, Madrid, 23 September 2014 – 11 January 2015. Exhibition curated by the artist’s great-grandaughter Blanca Pons-Sorolla , presenting over 100 paintings, oil sketches and drawings, by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (1863-1923) covering his early socially realistic themes as well as his better known landscapes and beach scenes. Exhibition focuses on key American collectors Archer Huntington and Thomas Fortune Ryan and the impact on the artist and American cultural society of the exhibitions he held in the States in 1909 and 1911. Accompanied by bilingual English/Spanish editions of the catalogue.
The exhibition and its catalogue (by the artist’s great granddaughter and Mark Roglan, Director of the Dallas Museum) have received an enthusiastic and thoughtful review by Richard Brettell in April’s edition of The Burlington Magazine (pp 267-269), which makes interesting comparisons with other recent Sorolla exhibitions over the last decade.