Tag Archives: Sculpture

Call for Applications: Sculptural Workshops, Botín Foundation, Santander, 17–28 September 2018—deadline 10 August

901c9487cb6fed6497d73096ee245fbd-cristina-iglesias-land-artSince 1994, the Sculptural Workshops of the Botín Foundation have brought together in Santander young artists from all over the world, to work alongside major figures from the art world. For its next edition, which will take place between September 17 and 28, 2018, the sculptor Cristina Iglesias (San Sebastián, 1958) proposes a research workshop based on her work process, from intimate reflection in the studio through to the implementation of the project in the public sphere. Cristina Iglesias (winner of Spain’s National Sculpture Prize in 1999) is one of the most internationally recognized Spanish artists. Famous for her sculptural works, with suspended pavilions, lattices, corridors and labyrinths, the artist combines industrial materials and elements of nature in her works to create unusual places and spaces of experience. For two weeks, 15 artists will live with Iglesias exchanging experiences and shared work while developing their own personal project, which can also be shared with the public in an open day. The participants in the workshop will propose a project on a topic involving drawings, texts, plans, models or video, and in a place chosen by them that they will develop during their stay. Participants will also visit the city of Santander and its surroundings to discover places or contexts that will help them to develop their project. In addition the artists will visit the foundry in Éibar where Iglesias works, and her installation on the island of Santa Clara de San Sebastián.

The installation of the exhibition CRISTINA IGLESIAS: ENTRƎSPACIOS / INTERSPACES at the Botín Center 6 October 2018 – 24 February 2019 will allow them to discover in a practical way how the artist’s work occupies the space. As a final point of the workshop, the artists will present and defend their project before a panel of professionals who will study and evaluate the projects. The deadline for submitting applications to the workshop is August 10, 2018.

For further information about the workshop and grants towards accommodation and maintenance click here.

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A New Acquisition on Display at the Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

dsc_0008Now on display at the Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid the museum’s newly acquired group of 19 individual polychrome sculptures by the Seville-born Luisa Roldán (1652-1706), forming the unusual subject of the Cavalcade of the Kings. These small-scale cedar-wood painted and gilded figures were acquired in December 2017 after being export-stopped and are the first examples of La Roldana’s work to enter the Valladolid museum. Amongst the mixed-race cavalcade, which is presumed to have formed the cortege for a much larger, but now dismantled, group, there is a fourth king, the King of Tharsis, the mythical Hispanic region cited in the Bible. The group is believed to have been carved before the sculptress moved to the Madrid court in 1689. A video clip showing some of the figures can be viewed here.

Fellowships for Spanish Colonial Art

 

brooklyn_museum_-_virgin_of_carmel_saving_souls_in_purgatory_-_circle_of_diego_quispe_tito_-_overall

Virgin of Carmel Saving Souls in Purgatory, Peru. Circle of Diego Quispe Tito, 17th century, collection of the Brooklyn Museum

Marilynn Thoma Fellowship 

The Marilynn Thoma Fellowship is the only unrestricted research funding in the United States devoted exclusively to the field of Spanish Colonial art. Each year from May 1 to October 15, pre- and post-doctoral scholars from across the world are invited to apply for research support in the amounts of $45,000 and $60,000, respectively. Recipients are selected by an international jury of three undisclosed experts in the field and notified in mid-December, with travel commencing within 18 months following notification. Selected scholars design their research projects independently, using funding in any reasonable way to accomplish their goals.

Fellowships range in duration from one to two years, and eventuate in major measurable outcomes, including museum exhibitions, dissertations, book publications, scholarly essays, and lecture series. While proposals are accepted from all of Spanish colonial Latin America and the Caribbean, the Foundation gives strong preference to projects that contribute to the history of painting and sculpture in colonial South America.

To apply, please complete the application via Slideroom.
Research and Travel Awards in Spanish Colonial Art 

Congruent with the Marilynn Thoma Fellowship, applications for the Thoma Foundation Research and Travel Awards in Spanish Colonial art are open from May 1 to October 15 of every year. Awards of up to $15,000 are available to independent scholars and advanced graduate students completing MA or PhD dissertations to help defray the costs of research-related expenses. Funding is provided each year to several scholars selected by an international jury of undisclosed experts in the field, with travel commencing within one year + one month from the date of notification. The Awards support research projects ranging in duration from 1 week to 3 months.

To apply, please complete the application via Slideroom.

Please contact info@thomafoundation.org if you have questions.

Updated Programme: COLLECTING SPAIN: SPANISH DECORATIVE ARTS IN BRITAIN AND SPAIN, Hochhauser Auditorium, Victoria and Albert Museum, 8 and 9 June 2018

V&ACoordinators: Ana Cabrera and Lesley Miller

This conference explores collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain from the 19thcentury onwards, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies aredrawnfrom the British and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organisedin joint sessions dealing with the same subject from British and then Spanish perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference includes poster sessions during the coffee breaks.

Click here to buy tickets

Programme

Friday, 8thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish Decorative Arts

10.00             Registration and collecting of conference packs; displaying of posters

10.20            Introduction

Ana Cabrera, V&A

10:30       Collecting, Display & Dissemination: The Changing Face of the Decorative Arts Collection at South Kensington, 1852-1873

Susanna Avery-Quash, National Gallery, London

Lustreware and Furniture

Chair: Holly Trusted, V&A

11.00             Collecting Spanish Lustreware at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Mariam Rosser-Owen, Asian Department, V&A

11:30            A Survey and History of the Collecting of Spanish Decorative Arts: Lustreware

Jaume Coll, Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia

12.00-12.30.     COFFEE BREAK

12:30      Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

Nick Humphrey, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A

13:00             Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid, 1880-1920

Sofía Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

13.30-14.30       LUNCH

Textiles and Fashion

Chair: Sonnet Stanfill, V&A

14:30             Following the Thread: Collecting Spanish Textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Ana Cabrera, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A

15:30             Textile Collecting in Catalonia

Silvia Carbonell, Centre de Documentació i Museu Tèxtil, Terrasa

16:00            Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Oriole Cullen, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

16:30             From Dress to Fashion: The Collection of The Museo del Traje

Helena López del Hierro, Museo del Traje, Madrid

16.30-17.00       TEA BREAK

Sculpture and Plaster Casts

Chair: Edward Payne, Auckland Castle Project

17.00             A Vogue for St Francis

Xavier Bray, Wallace Collection, London

17:30       Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the Profile of Spanish Art through Plaster Casts

Holly Trusted, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

18:00       Electrical Treasuries: The Decorative Arts Collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones, 1881-1915

María Bolaños, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

18.30-19.00       DISCUSSION

Saturday, 9thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish decorative arts continued

Silver

Chair: Antonia Boström, V&A

10:15       The Scholar, the Scoundrel and the Skater: How the V&A Collections of Hispanic Silver were formed

Kirstin Kennedy, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

10:45             Collecting Spanish Silver

Jesús Rivas, Universidad de Murcia

11.15-11.45COFFEE BREAK

Displaying, Interpreting and Conserving Spanish Decorative Arts

Chair: Christopher Wilk, V&A

11.45            Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative Analysis

Isabel Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

12.15             Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries at the V&A

Lesley Miller, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

12.45             The20th-century Galleries at the V&A

Corinna Gardner and Johanna Agerman Ross, Design, Architecture and Digital Department, V&A

13.15-14.15LUNCH

Displaying, Interpreting and conserving Spanish decorative arts

Chair: Joanna Norman, V&A

14.15             The Conservationof the Cast Courts. New Discoveries from Spanish Casts

Victor Borges, Conservation Department, V&A

14:45             Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland

Edward Payne, The Auckland Project

15.15             Closing remarks

Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Miguel González Suela, Directorate of the State Museum, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports

Conference: Collecting Spain: Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain, V&A, London, 8th–9th June 2018

V&ASpanish art has been collected in the UK since the 17th century. This conference will explore collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies will be drawn from the V&A and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organized in joint sessions dealing with the same subject from Spanish and then British perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media, while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference will include poster session during the coffee breaks.

Opening remarks on the history of collecting Spanish Decorative Arts by medium: Collecting, Display & Dissemination: the changing face of the decorative arts collection at South Kensington (1852-1873), Dr Susanna Avery-Quash (Senior Research Curator, History of Collecting, National Gallery)

  • Ceramics: Lusterware:
    M. Rosser-Owen (Asian Department, V&A): Collecting Spanish lustreware by the Victoria and Albert MuseumJaume Coll (Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia): A survey and history of collecting Spanish Decorative Arts: Lusterware 
  •  Textiles:
    Ana Cabrera (Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A): Following the thread: collecting Spanish textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum Spanish case

    Silvia Carbonell (Centro de Documentación Museo Textil, Tarrasa): Textile collecting in Catalonia
  • Silver:
    Kirstin Kennedy (Metalwork Department, V&A): The Scholar, the scoundrel and the skater: How the V&A collections of Hispanic silver were formed

    Jesús Rivas (Universidad de Murcia): Collecting Spanish silverwork
  • Furniture:
    Nick Humphrey (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A): Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

    Sofía Rodríguez (Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid): Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid (1880-1920)
  • Sculpture and Plaster Cast:
    Xavier Bray (Wallace Collection): A Vogue for St Francis

    Holly Trusted (Sculpture Department, V&A): Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the profile of Spanish Art through Plaster CastsMaria Bolaños (Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid): Electrical treasuries: the Decorative Arts collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones (1881-1915)

     

  •  Fashion:
    Oriole Cullen (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A): Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

    Helena López del Hierro (Museo del Traje, Madrid): From Dress to Fashion:the collection of The Museo del Traje

  • Displaying, interpreting and conserving collections of Spanish decorative arts:
    Isabel Rodríguez (Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid): Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative AnalysisCorinna Gardner and
    Johanna Agerman Ross (Design, Architecture and Digital, V&A): 20th century Galleries at the V&A

    Lesley Miller (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion, V&A): Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries

    Victor Borges (Conservation Department, V&A): The Conservation of the Cast Courts. New discoveries on the Spanish Casts

  • Closing speaker: Dr Edward Payne (Head Curator: Spanish Art, Auckland Castle): Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland
  • Closing remarks: Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Booking required: click here

Forthcoming Exhibition: ‘Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida’ at the Meadows Museum, Dallas

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Eduardo Chillida, Peine del Vento, 1977
San Sebastián, Guipuzkoa, Spain

This spring, the Meadows Museum will present Dallas’s first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Eduardo Chillida (1924–2002). Chillida, one of Spain’s most celebrated modern sculptors, is famous for his monumental iron and stone sculptures that shape both urban and rural landscapes. This exhibition includes 66 of the artist’s works, from his sculptures, to his drawings, collages, gravitations, graphic works, and a selection of his books. Co-curated by William Jeffett, chief curator of exhibitions for The Dalí Museum, and Ignacio Chillida, the artist’s son, the works in Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida come exclusively from the Museo Chillida-Leku in Hernani (San Sebastián, Spain); the exhibition travels to Dallas from the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. A complimentary exhibition, Chillida in Dallas: De Musica at the Meyerson, is curated by Meadows/Mellon/Prado Curatorial Fellow Amanda W. Dotseth and will focus on the landmark commission by Chillida at Dallas’s Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. The two exhibitions will open on February 4, 2018, and run through June 3.

The exhibition will be accompanied by an educational programme which will include:

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 10:30 A.M.
LUIS CHILLIDA, director, Fundación Eduardo Chillida-Pilar Belzunce
Memory, Mind, Matter: The Public Art of Eduardo Chillida in

Focus

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 12:15 P.M.
AMANDA W. DOTSETH, Meadows/Mellon/Prado curatorial fellow, Meadows
Museum
Medieval and Modern: Alabaster from Gil de Siloé to
Eduardo Chillida

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 6:00-7:00 P.M.
BEATRIZ CORDERO, professor, Saint Louis University, Madrid
Lightness and Rightness: Eduardo Chillida and James Johnson
Sweeney in the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 12:15 P.M.
JED MORSE, chief curator, Nasher Sculpture Center
Chillida in Dallas Part I: Chillida Downtown

SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 10:00 A.M.-1:00 P.M.
FAMILY DAY

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 12:15 P.M.
SCOTT WINTERROWD, director of education, Meadows Museum
Chillida in Dallas Part II: Chillida in Dallas

 

Opening soon: Intacta María. Política y religiosidad en la España barroca, 30 November 2017 – 8 April 2018, Museo de Bellas Artes de Valencia

alegorc3ada_de_la_virgen_inmaculada2c_atribuida_a_juan_de_roelas_28museo_nacional_de_escultura_de_valladolid29The exhibition Intacta María. Política y religiosidad en la España barroca, opening on 30 November  2017, analyses the process through which devotion to the Immaculate conception was created and popularised in early modern Spain. While the Immaculate Conception only became dogma in 1854, as early as 1616 the Spanish Monarchy became a staunch supporter of the theory, turning its defence into a national priority. In the following years, the Immaculate Conception became Spain’s most heartfelt devotion and a sign of national identity. Art played an important role in this process, amounting to what we may describe as a marketing campaign. This will be the focus of the Museo de Bellas Artes’ forthcoming exhibition, featuring more than 50 paintings, sculptures, prints and books borrowed from notable Spanish museums and churches such as the Museo Nacional de Escultura de Valladolid, the Cathedral of Seville, the Biblioteca Nacional de España, and many others.

 

Please click here for more information on the exhibition.