Tag Archives: Belgium

International Study Day: Iberian Polychromed Sculpture, Musée L (Université Catholique de Louvain), Louvain, December 7, 2018

The Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA) in Brussels, in collaboration with the Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), organises  the first conference in Belgium devoted to Iberian polychromed sculpture and its relation to other Europeans regions. Referring to UCL’s Spanish sculpture collections, this conference brings together scholars specialised in the sculpture from Spain, Belgium, Italy and Mexico. The speakers will trace the sculptures from their production, their technics, their links and reception in other European regions.

1. Lectures (Auditoire du Musée L)

09:15-09:50 –  Welcome

09:50-10:00  – Introduction remarks – Eduardo Lamas-Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels)

The polychrome Sculpture in Spain and Latin America (chairwoman, Abigail Newman, Universiteit Antwerpen)

10:00-10:20 – Manuel García Luque (Universidad de Granada), El escultor Pedro de Mena y el naturalismo matérico

10:20-10:40 – Pablo Amador (Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional de México), Aspectos técnicos de la escultura policromada hispánica

10:40-11:00 – Géraldine Patigny (Université Libre de Bruxelles – Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), La sculpture polychromée espagnole dans les collections belges

11:00-11:15 – Questions and debate

11:15-11:30 – Coffee break

The Spanish polychrome Sculpture and Europe (chairman, Ralph Dekoninck, Université Catholique de Louvain)

11:30-11:50 – Roberto Alonso Moral (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), La migración de escultura entre Nápoles y España durante el siglo XVII y su impacto: algunos problemas de identificación

11:50-12:10 – Wendy Frère (Université Libre de Bruxelles), La polychromie dans la sculpture baroque des anciens Pays-Bas méridionaux et la Principauté de Liège

12:10-12:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum, London), Passion and Prejudice: Attitudes towards Spanish Sculpture in Britain in the Nineteenth Century

12:30-12:40 – Questions and debate

12:45-13:45 – Lunch

2. Study session: the Spanish Medieval and Early Renaissance Sculptures from Val-Duchesse (chairwoman, Corinne Van Hauwermeiren, CONSERVART)

14:00-15:00 Emmanuelle Mercier (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Erika Rabello (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Mathieu Somon (Université Catholique de Louvain).

15:00-15:15 – Questions and debate

15:15-15:30 – Concluding remarks

3. Visit to the Museum Collection

Free, booking required. Click here to reserve a place and for more information.

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ZURBARÁN: Master of Spain’s Golden Age

Exhibition

The Bozar Centre for Fine Arts,Rue Ravenstein 33, 1000 Brussels

Wed 29 January – Sun 25 May 2014

Francisco de Zurbarán, Portrait of Santa Casilda, oil on canvas, Museo Thyssen, Madrid.jpg,Santa Casilda, c.1635, oil on canvas, 171 x 107 cms, Museo Thyssen Bornemisza Madrid

A Cup of Water and a Rose, c.1630, oil on canvas, 21 x 30 cms, National Gallery London

 zurbaran-cup-water-rose-NG6566-fm

For more information see  http://www.bozar.be/activity.php?id=13203i

“Zurbarán,” first shown at the Palazzo dei Diamanti in Ferrara,  and now showing at Bozar in Brussels until 25 May 2014, is the first show dedicated to the artist since the landmark publication of the first volume of Odile Delenda’s catalogue raisonné of the artist’s work in 2009, which identified 286 paintings as being by his own hand. Expertly curated by Ignacio Cano Rivero and Gabriele Finaldi, this skillfully selected and lucidly presented show of 49 pieces offers a comprehensive survey of Zurbarán’s career and is studded with masterpieces.

Zurbarán’s father was a textile merchant in the village of Fuente de Cantos in southern Spain, where the artist was born in 1598. Francisco was apprenticed to a now forgotten local painter in Seville from 1614 to 1617, during which time he met Velázquez, who became a lifelong friend. But whereas the latter forged a career in the courts of Madrid and Rome, becoming the leading portrait painter of his age, Zurbarán had a vocation for religious painting (and a deep knowledge of Spain’s mystical thought and literature).

Having moved to Llerena, in his native province of Badajoz, in 1622, the artist received a commission for 15 canvases for his birthplace. By the mid 1620s he was also sending cycles of works to Seville, where in 1629 he was invited by the city council to take up residence and where he would spend most of the rest of his life.

Although Zurbarán never set foot outside Spain, by the time he was training as a painter Caravaggio’s work was well known there. But whatever lessons Zurbarán learned from Caravaggio, his own paintings, not to mention his subject matter, remained distinct from the outset, not least in the intense spirituality with which he infused his images.

The exhibition continues roughly chronologically, but also according to themes: “First Major Commissions,” “Visions and Ecstasies,” “Still-lifes,” “The Mystical in the Everyday,” “Passion and Compassion,” “Works for the Court and the New World” and “Last Years: Madrid.”

Zurbarán’s vibrant still-lifes have been a key element in stimulating the rediscovery of this artist in modern times, though he did only a handful of independent works in this genre. Two of the most celebrated, “A Cup of Water and a Rose” from the National Gallery in London, and “Still-life” from the Prado in Madrid, are on display here. The pious message of these pieces tends to be overlooked by modern viewers. For Zurbarán’s contemporaries, the rose in the National Gallery picture, for instance, would have had clear associations with the Virgin Mary, and the white cup with purity and the Immaculate Conception.

These still-lifes were evidently popular in the artist’s own times, as he produced several versions of some of them. And beautifully executed still-life elements play an important emblematic part in many of his other paintings — from skulls, flowers and bowls of fruit to the brilliantly lit earthenware jug, bread, olives and radishes, representing the eucharist and Christ’s humility, in “Supper at Emmaus,” on loan from the Museo Nacional de San Carlos in Mexico City.

The artist’s studio in Seville produced a large number of canvases specifically for export to the New World. These were typically sold at the annual fair in Portobelo, Panama, and most ended up in Peru, where many can still be found. A high proportion of these pictures, executed by Zurbarán’s assistants, were of Biblical patriarchs.

By the time Zurbarán was in his 50s, Seville was suffering an economic crisis as a result of a diminution in trade with America and of the wars in Europe, further worsened by a plague in 1649, to which he lost his son Juan, a promising still-life painter. He also found himself challenged by a new generation of artists, above all Murillo.

In 1658 Zurbarán moved to Madrid, where he remained until his death in 1664. As the last two rooms of the Ferrara show reveal, his style and palette underwent radical changes there, particularly under the influence of Raphael, whose works were by then well represented in the Royal Collection.

Extracted from review by RODERICK CONWAY MORRIS   The New York Times   Published: October 23, 2013