Tag Archives: Naples

Job: Assistant Professor (Research): Pemberton Fellowship for the Study of Spanish Art, Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, University of Durham, UK

NNP-DURHAM_CONGREGATION_48This post is full-time and fixed term (1 September 2018 – 31 August 2019).

The Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art seeks to appoint an outstanding candidate to a one-year fixed-term Research Fellowship in Spanish and/or Neapolitan Art of the early modern period (1550-1750). This posts offer an exciting opportunity to make a major contribution to the development of research at the Zurbarán Centre in relation to Durham Castle (University College) at Durham University. The successful candidates will be expected to undertake internationally excellent research. There will also be the opportunity to contribute to teaching in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, with which the candidate will be administratively associated, to a maximum of 6 hours per week. The appointment is tenable from 1 September 2018 or as soon as possible thereafter.

We welcome applications from exceptional scholars with research interests Spanish art of the Golden Age and/or Italian art of the Classical and Baroque period, with a particular focus on major artistic centres such as Rome and Naples; in addition to painting, sculpture and architecture, we welcome applications centred also on decorative arts and garden history. The Pemberton Fellow will be associated with University College, located in Durham Castle, which houses a remarkable artistic collection which includes Spanish and Italian 17th-century art. The candidate will enjoy full board at Durham Castle (including meals and accommodation, subject to income tax and National Insurance deductions) as well as a contribution towards research related expenses.

Click here for more information
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4 months to go! ‘Ribera: Art of Violence’ opens 26 September 2018 at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

ribera-martiri-de-sant-bartomeu-large-bannerThis autumn, Dulwich Picture Gallery will present the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

A scholarly catalogue will accompany the exhibition, showcasing the new research which has informed the display.

Ribera: Art of Violence is co-curated by ARTES committee member Dr Edward Payne (Head Curator of Spanish Art, The Auckland Project), author of a PhD thesis on the theme of violence in Ribera’s art (2012) and contributor to the catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings (2016), and Dr Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection), former Arturo and Holly Melosi Chief Curator at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and curator of the National Gallery’s exhibitions The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700 (2009) and Goya: The Portraits (2015).

Click here for a video presenting the exhibition, and here for a preview article in The Guardian. 

Conference: Inmaculada Hispánica. Imaginarios visuales en una monarquía confesional, EEHAR, Rome, 6 June 2018

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The Catholic Church did not define the mystery of the Immaculate Conception of Mary as a dogma until 1854. Yet as early as 1616 Felipe III created the Real Junta de la Inmaculada and proclaimed the Spanish Crown as the greatest supporter of the doctrine. Ever since, the Spanish Monarchy was at the centre of an intense propaganda campaign intended to promote belief in the immaculate conception. Art played a key role in this project.

This seminar will explore the different aspects of this marketing operation in the Iberian kingdoms, in the Italian Viceroyalties and in Rome itself. From Madrid, Palermo and Seville, the speakers will unveil the images of one of the most striking campaigns of visual propaganda in history.

Coordinator: Rafael Valladares (EEHAR-CSIC)

Director: Pablo González Tornel (Universitat Jaume I)

Participants:

Pablo González Tornel (Universitat Jaume I): Inmaculada Hispánica. Propaganda y persuasión en la España del Seiscientos.
Piers Baker-Bates (Open University, London): Inmaculada Hispánica in Rome: visual propaganda in the service of doctrine.
Maurizio Vitella (Università degli Studi di Palermo): Iconografia della Purissima Regina nel Viceregno di Sicilia.
Benito Navarrete Prieto (Universidad de Alcalá): La Inmaculada como instrumento político desde Murillo al nacionalcatolicismo.

Location: Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma. Via di Sant’Eufemia 13. 00187 Roma.
Date and time: miércoles 6 de junio de 2018, 16:00 horas.

Click here for the programme in Spanish and Italian.

Closing soon: Picasso and Naples: Parade

Picasso and Naples: Parade
Museo di Capodimonte, Naples,
and the Antiquarium, Pompeii
8 April-10 July 2017

Exhibition across two venues celebrating the centennial of Picasso’s trip to Italy in 1917. The artist arrived in Rome on February 18, 1917, in the company of Jean Cocteau, with whom he was working on the designs for Parade, a ballet for Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes (with music by Eric Satie).Spending a little over two months in Italy, Picasso visited Naples twice, in March and April 2017. The displays include examples of Picasso’s stage and costume designs not only for Parade but also for Petrushka.

Catalogue

Click here for Joffrey Ballet’s revival of Parade

EXHIBITION Art in Naples, a Golden Age 20 June – 11 Oct 2015 Musée Fabre, Montepellier, France

The Musée Fabre is showing Art in Naples, a Golden Age from 20 June to 11 October 2015. This follows on from the highly successful Caravaggio exhibition held in 2012.

In the XVIIth century Naples – second to Paris – was the most populated city in Europe and nearly Paris’ equal as a centre of art and culture. It was in Naples, rather than in Rome, that the naturalistic forms, monochrome palette and sharply directed ‘cellar’ lighting invented by Caravaggio and introduced by him to the city by in 1606, evolved and developed, primarily in the work of Caracciolo, Stanzione and, above all, Ribera, who, with his immediate followers dominated Neapolitan art in the first half of the century. These artists, whose best paintings are of great, often tragic, intensity, coexisted with painters of highly-finished exquisite canvases, often on a small scale, such as Cavallino and Guarino, whose approach ultimately derived from an earlier, less intense and more voluptuous phase of Caravaggio’s work. But, in the second half of the century, painters such as Mattia Preti, Luca Giordano, and, in the genre of still-life, Giovanni Battista Recco, moved away from the extreme severity and concentration of the Caravaggesque tradition and gradually came to terms with the exuberance and amplitude of the Baroque with its sensual and fluid employment of colour and its grand patterns of movement, a development that culminated in the European-wide triumph of Solimena in the years around 1700.

The exhibition also illustrates the close connections between Neapolitan art and the city’s turbulent history, from the eruption of Vesuvius in 1631, through Masaniello’s revolt of 1647, to the devastating plague of 1656.

For more information about the exhibition and the Musée Fabre see:
Art in Naples a Golden Age – The Musée Fabre, Montpellier

musée fabre expo été naples
 
Musée Fabre
39 boulevard Bonne Nouvelle
34000 Montpellier
France
TEL: 00 33 4 67 14 83 00
Tram Line 1 Comédie or Corum
Tram Line 2 Corum

Opening times Tuesday to Sunday, 10am to 7pm
Closed Mondays. Open on July 14th and August 15th (Bank Holidays)
Entrance fee 10€   Concessionary fee 8€

Guided tours & times every day except Monday
In June, July & August at 11am & at 4pm
In September & October at 11am, 1pm & 4pm
Prices 13 €   With a Pass’Agglo/Pass’Métropole 10,50€   Concessionary rate 9,50€

expo naples fabre 2015
© Jusepe de Ribera, Le Pied Bot, 1642, huile sur toile, 164 x 93,5 cm, Paris, musée du Louvre, Photo © RMN-Grand Palais / Stéphane Maréchalle
 
expo naples 2015 musée fabre
© Bernardo Cavallino, Judith, vers 1650, huile sur toile, 101 x 94 cm, Stockholm, Nationalmuseum, Photo © Nationalmuseum, Stockholm