Tag Archives: art history

CFP: The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400, Valladolid, June 7–8, 2019

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 Tabernacle-shrine from Mule,
Iceland, now in the Nationalmuseet
in Conpenhagen; c.1250.
Photo: Justin Kroesen

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

How to Submit: Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es.

Deadline: Friday 18th of January 2019.

All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Museu de Lleida: diocesà i comarcal.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th  of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th  of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

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Call for Articles: The Iberian Peninsula under Debate: Historiography, Cultural Encounters and Identities (5th-16th centuries)

 

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A Sé Velha de Coimbra, por Roque Gameiro (1917)

Roda da Fortuna. Revista Eletrônica sobre Antiguidade e Medievo (Electronic Journal about Antiquity and Middle Ages) seeks submission for a thematic dossier, “The Iberian Peninsula under Debate: Historiography, Cultural Encounters and Identities (5th-16th centuries).”

 

Heiress of the Hispanic-Visigothic tradition, the territorial organization of the Iberian Peninsula was the result of a singular historical reality. The Muslims’ invasion of the region in the 8th century intensified the cultural heterogeneity already existing in the region, adding to political-religious conflicts and an ever-changing border. This state of hostility and also, at various moments, of interaction solidified in the experience of Al-Andalus. This peculiar region offers an important and broad interpretative possibility. With the advance of the Christian frontier after the formation of the Portuguese kingdom and the conquests of Cordova (1236) and Seville (1248), the map of the Peninsula changed definitively.

This thematic dossier intends to gather articles that discuss the Iberian experience during the Middle Ages, up to what has been defined as “maritime expansion” in modern historiography. Encompassing multiple research possibilities and varied approaches in such fields as representations, identities, and religious confessions, the debates on the Iberian worlds constitute an enormous challenge to the historian.

The deadline for submitting articles, reviews, and translations are:
– Submission of proposals: until April 30, 2019
– Acceptance of works: July 2019
– Dossier published: August 2019

Proposals must be sent to the e-mail: revistarodadafortuna@gmail.com 

Click here for more information.

 

ARTES Members’ Visit to the Año Murillo in Seville (30 November – 2 December 2018)

murillo

ARTES have organised a trip to Seville for members from 30th November to 2nd December 2018, the main aim being a curator-led tour of the exhibition Murillo IV Centenario, opening that week, as well as visits to the Cathedral, Hospital de los Venerables and de la Caridad, Alcázar, Casa de Pilatos and other sites of art historical significance.

Members must make their own travel and accommodation arrangements but should plan to arrive by Friday evening. A full programme (from Friday night to Sunday early evening) will be posted nearer the time.

murilloII

 ARTES members wishing to join the trip should RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com.    Places will be limited to 15 and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis.*

*We may ask for a deposit to secure a place with the money put towards the cost of dinner on Saturday night.


Images: Moses Striking the Rock at Horeb, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

Jesus Multiplies the Loaves and Fishes, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

Conference: Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain, Edinburgh College of Art, October 26, 2018

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Photomontage by Jean Harold, sent to Picasso by Jean Cocteau and captioned, on the back: by “Picasso – Negro period”

This international symposium opens up discussion of Spanish art and culture in relation to the construction of discourses of coloniality in 20th-century Spain, especially in the Francoist period.

It attempts to identify methodological approaches that would allow us to understand the consolidation of hegemonic colonial discourses and how they continue in Spain today. This examination involves an analysis of constructs of Otherness in two directions – inwards and outwards. On the one hand, how did artists, performers, writers, or other cultural brokers, based in Spain, exoticise other cultures as well as their own culture as part of official rhetoric (e.g. state-funded exhibitions relating to colonial territories in Africa; translations of Chinese texts/images, state administration of rural Spain). On the other hand, the analysis is concerned with Spanish (self-)representation as Other within international contexts (eg. Picasso in African attire; flamenco in imagery for tourism/political campaigns; Hispanic Studies as a political contestation to the dictatorship).

Organisation: María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya) of the R&D Research Group “Experiences of the Political in Francoist Spain” (MINECO) with Claudia Hopkins in the School of History of Art, University of Edinburgh.

Schedule

9am – 9.30am: Registration

9.30am – 10am: Welcome and introduction, Yayo Aznar (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia) and María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

10am – 1pm: Panel 1:  Appropriating the exotic, Chair: Paloma Gay-Blasco (University of St Andrews)

  • 10am – 10.30am: Neil Cox (University of Edinburgh), [Talk on Picasso – title tbc]
  • 10.30am – 11am: Esther Planas (University of the Arts London), Dissociative Fugue Disorder. Auto-exoticism as bio politics: Ways of questioning the production of culture during Francoism
  • 11am – 11.15am: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 11.15am – 11.45am: Francisco Aix (Universidad de Sevilla), Flamenco as a means to identity. An Andalusian perspective
  • 11.45am – 12.15pm: Alicia Fuentes Vega (Universidad Complutense Madrid), Title to be confirmed  
  • 12.15pm – 1pm: Panel discussion

2pm – 5pm: Panel 2: On the meaning of colony in Francoism, Chair: Richard Williams (University of Edinburgh)

  • 2pm – 2.30pm: Helena Miguélez-Carballeira (Bangor University), The Spanish rural subject and the Instituto Nacional de Colonización (1939-1971): A Biopolitical Perspective
  • 2.30pm – 3pm: Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh), The Dream of a Spanish-Moroccan Brotherhood. Art and Exhibitions, 1936-1956
  • 3pm – 3.15pm: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 3.15pm – 3.45pm: Carles Prado Pons (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya). A triangulated alterity: China in Spain, 1880-1930
  • 3.45pm – 4.15pm: José Saval (University of Edinburgh). Latin American Boom or Boomerang: the impact of the periphery in the metropolis.
  • 4.15pm – 5pm: Panel discussion and closing remarks

Free to attend, booking required. Click here to reserve a ticket. 

Click here for more information.

ARTES Event: Curator’s Tour of ‘Ribera: Art of Violence,’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery, 28 September 2018

ribera-apollo-and-marsyas-banner

ARTES members are invited to join ARTES’s committee member Dr Edward Payne for a special tour of the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence at Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-curated by Edward and ARTES member Dr Xavier Bray.

The curator-led tour will take place in the morning of Friday 28 September. The event will run as follows:

9.00–9.15 Coffee and welcome at Gail’s, 91 Dulwich Village, London SE21 7BJ, UK

9.15–9.45 Introduction: Why Ribera? Why violence? Why Dulwich Picture Gallery?

9.45–10.00 Private viewing of the exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (doors open to the general public at 10.00)

10.00–11.30 Curator-led tour of the exhibition followed by Q&A and general discussion

This event is free but spaces are limited. Please write to artesiberia@gmail.com to book your place.

01613386710_h-british-museum-cropped-large-banner

Ribera: Art of Violence is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

Click here for more information about the exhibition and related events.

 

ARTES Event: Curator’s Tour of ‘Ribera: Art of Violence,’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery, 28 September 2018

ribera-apollo-and-marsyas-banner

ARTES members are invited to join ARTES’s committee member Dr Edward Payne for a special tour of the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence at Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-curated by Edward and ARTES member Dr Xavier Bray.

The curator-led tour will take place in the morning of Friday 28 September. The event will run as follows:

9.00–9.15 Coffee and welcome at Gail’s, 91 Dulwich Village, London SE21 7BJ, UK

9.15–9.45 Introduction: Why Ribera? Why violence? Why Dulwich Picture Gallery?

9.45–10.00 Private viewing of the exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (doors open to the general public at 10.00)

10.00–11.30 Curator-led tour of the exhibition followed by Q&A and general discussion

This event is free but spaces are limited. Please write to artesiberia@gmail.com to book your place.

01613386710_h-british-museum-cropped-large-banner

Ribera: Art of Violence is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

Click here for more information about the exhibition and related events.

 

ARTES Event: Curator’s Tour of ‘Ribera: Art of Violence,’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery, 28 September 2018

ribera-apollo-and-marsyas-banner

ARTES members are invited to join ARTES’s committee member Dr Edward Payne for a special tour of the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence at Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-curated by Edward and ARTES member Dr Xavier Bray.

The curator-led tour will take place in the morning of Friday 28 September. The event will run as follows:

9.00–9.15 Coffee and welcome at Gail’s, 91 Dulwich Village, London SE21 7BJ, UK

9.15–9.45 Introduction: Why Ribera? Why violence? Why Dulwich Picture Gallery?

9.45–10.00 Private viewing of the exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (doors open to the general public at 10.00)

10.00–11.30 Curator-led tour of the exhibition followed by Q&A and general discussion

This event is free but spaces are limited. Please write to artesiberia@gmail.com to book your place.

01613386710_h-british-museum-cropped-large-banner

Ribera: Art of Violence is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

Click here for more information about the exhibition and related events.