Tag Archives: art history

Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship, Society of Architectural Historians, deadline 30 September, 2018

 

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Cathedral of Santa María la Menor, Santo Domingo

This award provides support for travel related to research on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture.

The awards consist of a $2,000 stipend for a junior scholar and a $6,000 award for a senior scholar. The awardees will be notified in December and will be recognized at the SAH 72nd Annual International Conference in Providence, Rhode Island (April 24–28, 2019). The awards will be announced in the May 2019 issue of the SAH Newsletter.

This fellowship is intended to support the research of junior scholars (usually scholars engaged in doctoral dissertation research) annually, and senior scholars (scholars who have completed their PhD or equivalent terminal degree) every other year in even-numbered years (2020, 2022, 2024, etc.). The research to be supported must focus on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture, including colonial architecture produced by the Spaniards in the Philippines and what is today the United States. The applicant must be a current member of SAH.

Following completion of travel and research supported by the fellowship, each de Montêquin Fellowship awardee must submit a written report summarizing their research and explaining what travel was undertaken and how funds were spent. The report will be submitted to the SAH office no later than three months following the completion of work related to the fellowship. Awardees are required to upload images to SAHARA (a minimum of 50  for junior scholars and a minimum of 150 for senior scholars).

You will need two recommendations to apply for this fellowship, a description of the research project on Iberian or Ibero-American architecture to be funded (500 words maximum), a current curriculum vitae (5 pages max), and a statement of purpose.

Applications for the 2019 Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship will open at 3 pm CDT on August 1, 2018, and close on September 30, 2018.

Click here for more information and to complete the application form.

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Workshop: Transatlantic Spain: the Afro-Hispanic Experience of Slavery and Freedom (15th–19th centuries), Birkbeck, University of London, 6 July 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f463781942f1063291068392f12foriginalThis international workshop aims to contribute to the visibilization of enslaved and free peoples of Afro-Hispanic descent, by exploring their representation in the visual and literary regimes of early modern Spain and the New World, and to generate critical insights into the articulation of slave subjectivities.

This gathering, supported by CILAVS, the Centre of Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies at Birkbeck, University of London is organised by the Transatlantic Afro-Hispanic Study Group, that emerged from the international conference Border Subjects/ Global Hispanisms (Birkbeck, November 2017). The latter was the outcome of the institutional collaboration between the Department of Cultures and Languages at Birkbeck and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. This collaboration has already produced our first publication entitled, Post/Colonialism and the Pursuit of Freedom in the Black Atlantic (Routledge, 2018, ed. J. Branche), the result of an international conference held at the University of Pittsburgh in 2015.

To attend the workshop, please register here.

PROGRAMME

14:30pm-16:00

Jerome Branche (University of Pittsburgh, USA), Love and Affec(ta)tion: Re/Viewing Francisco de Quevedo’s ‘Boda de negros

Francisco de Quevedo’s ‘Boda de negros,’ (in)famous for its conceptista artistry as much as for its anti-immigrant and anti-black virulence, acquires an important historico-existential dimension when considered in the broader context of (Hispano)-Christian religious symbology of the seventeenth century. My paper proposes that the poem’s central trope of marital consummation, the performance of coitus by the black groom, simultaneously speaks to and reveals important additional registers of both sexual and racial dominance. On the one hand, the aromantic and bloody implications of bridal penetration sans affection figure as an early discursive projection of black brutality in Hispanic and western artistic discourse, as also do the poem’s references to cannibalism. On the other, the image of the nail (es/clavo), which he punningly deploys to also identify Tomé, the groom, partakes of the symbology of humiliation, servitude, and death (by crucifixion), that characterize Catholic traditions of mysticism, saintliness and self-negation. My paper proposes that a reflection on the image of the S and the nail deployed here by the poet, ubiquitous in the popular and religious iconography of the time, beyond the symbolism of Christian devotion/abjection, also speaks volumes in relation to the enslaved, incoming Africans, and to the material and epistemic violence visited and potentially visited on their bodies under the aegis of conquest and enslavement.

Baltasar Fra-Molinero (Bates College, Maine, USA), Black Women and the Inquisition: Race, Gender, Healing, and Power

More than two hundred women of African descent were prosecuted by the Inquisition of the Canary Islands between 1505 and 1834. Most cases involved accusations of witchcraft, or its lesser charge, sorcery. The accusations involved healing practices that the religious authorities considered unorthodox. The accusers could be priests as well as lay people who, in some cases, were coerced to testify against these women on the basis of their social reputation as healers outside the legal and professional channels. These women competed against the male practitioners of faculty medicine as well as against curanderosand saludadores, men and women who were authorized to use a mixture of empirical healing knowledge with religious prayers to obtain cures or remedies to the health of individuals or entire groups. This presentation explores the tensions created when Black women in the Canary Islands practiced medicine and magic healing while negotiating their social exclusion due to their gender and race. The reputation some of these Black women gained broke boundaries of religious and social prohibition. The Inquisition moved against many of these Black women on charges both of heresy—use of religious objects and words without authorization—and professional impropriety—practicing medicine without proper faculty—a crime that clearly fell outside the jurisdiction of the Holy Office.

Helen Melling (Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London, U.K.), Contested Visions of Black Wet Nurses in 18th & 19th Century Lima

Portraits of infants alongside their black wet nurses and nannies were incorporated into the family albums of the wealthiest Peruvian and European immigrant families in Lima from the 1860s, coinciding with the immediate post-abolition period in Peru. Although the creole elite’s preference in employing wet nurses of African-descent is examined and contested in late 18th century discourses, their presence in Peruvian visual culture does not arise until the advent of photography, producing the first images to make visible a practice that dates from Peru’s colonial and slaveholding past. The duplicity of these portraits resides in the dissonance between the marginal or supposedly ‘invisible’ presence of the wet nurse, and their centrality in the formation of an elite identity. This tension ruptures the fantasy of masterly ownership and creole ‘whiteness’, with the wet nurse constituting a deeply ambivalent symbol of the socio-racial pedigree of the elite.

16:15-16:30 Break

16.30-18.15

Carmen Fracchia (Birkbeck, University of London, U.K.), The Colour of Freedom in Hapsburg Spain (16th-17th Centuries)

This paper addresses the ways in which visual artists articulate and problematize the hegemonic associations of the appearance of (a) blackness as the social condition of slavery and the appearance of (b) whiteness as the social condition of freedom in the visual form. It will also focus on the hegemonic idea of ‘whiteness’ as the exclusive referent of the concept of humanity and on ‘blackness’ as the referent of Afro-Hispanic counter-culture as articulated in anonymous poems written individually and collectively by enslaved and liberated Afro-Hispanic people in the Spanish black confraternities.

José Miguel López García (University Autónoma of Madrid, Spain), In Pursuit of Freedom: Emancipated, Coartados, and Marrooned in Madrid (1701-1820)

During the Bourbon Dynasty, slaves in Madrid could obtain their freedom through letters of emancipation, deeds of ransom (coartación), or by running away. This paper, based on the analysis of 344 documents from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the early 19th century, considers the different degrees and routes to freedom that slaves could aspire to in a European capital city.

Luis Méndez Rodriguez (University of Seville, Spain), Narratives and Fictions Around Slavery: Towards A New Artistic Imaginary

This work analyzes the elements which defined artistic narratives and which allowed the spread of a visual culture of transatlantic slavery through the Hispanic world from the beginning of the seventeenth century. The Baroque created a set of archetypal images of Afro-Hispanic people, based eitheron their integration into, or their social exclusion from Hispanic societies. In this way, many groups congregated into ethnicbrotherhoods where they found a space to protect themselves from external threats, based on solidarity which allowed their visible participation in the public space. This paper also analyzes a set of images which formed an iconography of slavery. In the artistic context, some slaves not only achieved their freedom but also developed a profession and a certain social recognition. Their presence is studied in the development of a first artistic historiography based on documentary evidence, which also reveals how a fictional discourse of Afro-Hispanic lives was generated in the centuries that followed.

ARTES AGM and Prize-Giving Ceremony Report, Oxford, 14 June 2018

home2On 14 June 2018 ARTES held its AGM and prize-giving ceremony in Oxford. It was a day packed with special visits to rarely-seen collections of Spanish art in the city. The day started at Campion Hall, a Jesuit private hall which hosts a fascinating private collection of religious art from Europe, Latin America, and from Christian missions elsewhere in the world.

The visit was followed by the group’s annual general meeting and prize-giving ceremony, held at the Taylorian, Oxford University’s centre for the study of Modern European languages and literatures. Artes presented the following prizes:

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Artes’ honorary president, Sir John Elliott (Regius Professor Emeritus, University of Oxford) with some of the prize winners

The Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal
Awarded to Javier Vicente Arenas (MA Student, Warburg Institute, London), for his essay titled Constructing a ‘Transmediterranean’ Identity: Rodrigo de Borgia’s Italian Angels in Valencia Cathedral (1472-81)

Prizes were also presented to two runners-up: Jamie Haskell (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay titled The Hispano-Moresque Haggadah and Helena Haugli (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay The Botella de Astorga Reliquary and the Transfer, Functions, and Meanings of a Fatimid Rock Crystal in Remote Christian Spain. 

ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholarships

Travel scholarships were awarded to:

Susy Oram, who will travel to Mexico to study Mudéjar art and architecture in the region during the viceregal period.

 

Danielle Smith, CEEH/David Wilkie Scholar for the Study of Spanish Art at the University of Edinburgh, who will travel to Madrid to carry out research for her PhD dissertation, titled ‘Colecciones de Trajes de España: exploring sartorial representation in Spanish printed books, 1777-1825′
Elizabeth Chant, a PhD candidate at the School of European Languages, Cultures, and Society, UCL, who will travel to Seville and Madrid to research ‘Illuminating the Map: Spanish Enlightenment Cartography of the Costa Patagónica
Stefanie Lenk, a curator and PhD candidate at the University of Oxford, who is studying the re-use of Roman altars in paleochristian and Visigothic churches in Spain.
 
This scholarship was awarded to Sylvia Alvares-Correa, who is working on a PhD titled ‘From Flanders to Portugal: the transmission of northern art, artists, and techniques to Portugal through the collection of Rainha Dona Leonor’s (1458-1525)’ at the university of Oxford.

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The day continued with a visit to Magdalen College, founded by William Waynflete in 1458. The College holds wide-ranging art collections, including a Spanish altarpiece representing  Christ Carrying the Cross in the College Chapel. Previously attributed to Valdés Leal, the work, which remains unstudied, was more likely produced by another Sevillian painter in seventeenth century.

Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies at Birkbeck, U of London—Deadline 15 June 2018

Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies 18-19

Birkbeck School of Arts will award one fully funded Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies beginning in 2018-19. 

We invite outstanding applicants working in one or more than one of the constituent disciplines of Renaissance Studies (ca. 1400-1670) in the School of Arts at Birkbeck. Applications are welcomed within the fields of History of Art; English Literature; Drama and Theatre Studies; Intellectual History; Early Modern French Studies; Iberian and Latin American Studies and Visual Culture. The scholarship is equally open to candidates wishing to work in interdisciplinary ways and to those located within one of the single disciplines.

Supervision in Renaissance Studies in the School of Arts is wide in scope. For a list of Renaissance Studies specialists, who can act as supervisors, please visit the academic staff pages on the School’s departmental websites.

Eligibility

Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarships are open to Home/EU and International applicants applying for a full-time or part time M.Phil/PhD place within the School of Arts, starting in the 2018/19 academic year.

Funding

The Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarship awards will include a full fee waiver capped at the value of the full-time Home/EU rate for M.Phil/PhD degrees (currently £4,260), in addition to an annual stipend set at Research Council rates (currently £16,777; pro rata in the case of a part-time award).

Duration of Awards

Scholarships will be tenable for up to three years (subject to satisfactory academic progress) for full-time students, and at an appropriate pro rata rate and extended duration for part-time students.

How to Apply – Application Process

To apply for an award please download the funding application form here.

Please note that you will also need to apply for a place on a relevant PhD programme:

M.Phil/PhD Comparative Literature

M.Phil/PhD English and Humanities

M.Phil/PhD French

M.Phil/PhD German

M.Phil/PhD History of Art

M.Phil/PhD Iberian and Latin American Studies

Please consult the general guidance on applying online for an M.Phil/PhD place. You can find the School of Arts Guide for Applicants here. All prospective students are strongly advised to first make informal contact with a potential supervisor. For information about staff and the research environment at Birkbeck, please consult the School’s Departmental webpages.

Application Deadline: 6pm 15 June 2018.

Please be advised that all applicants wishing to be considered for funding may be required to attend an interview to discuss their proposal. Interviews will be held in w/c 18 and 25 June (if not before). Results will be announced in early July 2018.

The completed form should be emailed to SoAFA@bbk.ac.uk.

If you have any enquiries about this studentship and the scope of supervision within the School of Arts, please contact Dr Luisa Calè, Assistant Dean for Postgraduate Research (l.cale@bbk.ac.uk).

Featured Exhibition: Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, until 22 July 2018

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Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (Mexican, 1713–1772). Portrait of Doña Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas (detail), c. 1762. Galería Coloniart, Collection of Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andrés Siegel, Mexico City. Photo © Rafael Doniz

The vitality and inventiveness of artists in eighteenth-century New Spain (Mexico) is the focus of Pinxit Mexici, an exhibition which presents some 110 works of art (primarily paintings), many of which are unpublished and newly restored. The exhibition surveys the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlights the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. It is the first major exhibition devoted to this neglected topic.

The exhibition is divided in thematic sections: Great Masters; Masters Storytellers and the Art of Expression; Noble Pursuits and the Academy; Paintings of the Land; The Power of Portraiture; The Allegorical World; Imagining the Sacred.

Click here to find out more.

Updated Programme: COLLECTING SPAIN: SPANISH DECORATIVE ARTS IN BRITAIN AND SPAIN, Hochhauser Auditorium, Victoria and Albert Museum, 8 and 9 June 2018

V&ACoordinators: Ana Cabrera and Lesley Miller

This conference explores collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain from the 19thcentury onwards, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies aredrawnfrom the British and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organisedin joint sessions dealing with the same subject from British and then Spanish perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference includes poster sessions during the coffee breaks.

Click here to buy tickets

Programme

Friday, 8thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish Decorative Arts

10.00             Registration and collecting of conference packs; displaying of posters

10.20            Introduction

Ana Cabrera, V&A

10:30       Collecting, Display & Dissemination: The Changing Face of the Decorative Arts Collection at South Kensington, 1852-1873

Susanna Avery-Quash, National Gallery, London

Lustreware and Furniture

Chair: Holly Trusted, V&A

11.00             Collecting Spanish Lustreware at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Mariam Rosser-Owen, Asian Department, V&A

11:30            A Survey and History of the Collecting of Spanish Decorative Arts: Lustreware

Jaume Coll, Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia

12.00-12.30.     COFFEE BREAK

12:30      Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

Nick Humphrey, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A

13:00             Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid, 1880-1920

Sofía Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

13.30-14.30       LUNCH

Textiles and Fashion

Chair: Sonnet Stanfill, V&A

14:30             Following the Thread: Collecting Spanish Textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Ana Cabrera, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A

15:30             Textile Collecting in Catalonia

Silvia Carbonell, Centre de Documentació i Museu Tèxtil, Terrasa

16:00            Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Oriole Cullen, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

16:30             From Dress to Fashion: The Collection of The Museo del Traje

Helena López del Hierro, Museo del Traje, Madrid

16.30-17.00       TEA BREAK

Sculpture and Plaster Casts

Chair: Edward Payne, Auckland Castle Project

17.00             A Vogue for St Francis

Xavier Bray, Wallace Collection, London

17:30       Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the Profile of Spanish Art through Plaster Casts

Holly Trusted, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

18:00       Electrical Treasuries: The Decorative Arts Collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones, 1881-1915

María Bolaños, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

18.30-19.00       DISCUSSION

Saturday, 9thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish decorative arts continued

Silver

Chair: Antonia Boström, V&A

10:15       The Scholar, the Scoundrel and the Skater: How the V&A Collections of Hispanic Silver were formed

Kirstin Kennedy, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

10:45             Collecting Spanish Silver

Jesús Rivas, Universidad de Murcia

11.15-11.45COFFEE BREAK

Displaying, Interpreting and Conserving Spanish Decorative Arts

Chair: Christopher Wilk, V&A

11.45            Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative Analysis

Isabel Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

12.15             Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries at the V&A

Lesley Miller, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

12.45             The20th-century Galleries at the V&A

Corinna Gardner and Johanna Agerman Ross, Design, Architecture and Digital Department, V&A

13.15-14.15LUNCH

Displaying, Interpreting and conserving Spanish decorative arts

Chair: Joanna Norman, V&A

14.15             The Conservationof the Cast Courts. New Discoveries from Spanish Casts

Victor Borges, Conservation Department, V&A

14:45             Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland

Edward Payne, The Auckland Project

15.15             Closing remarks

Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Miguel González Suela, Directorate of the State Museum, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports

Featured Exhibition: ‘The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War’

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Thea Haberfeld                Landscape, 1943

Oil on canvas
35 x 52 cm
Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery

‘‘The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War,’ on show at the at the Sala Brasil of London’s Brazilian Embassy until 22 June, recreates an exhibition of modern Brazilian painting held at the Royal Academy and seven regional galleries in 1944. The show was part of a concerted politic and cultural effort to cement Brazilian-British relations after the South American country’s entrance in the Allied coalition in 1942. Having successfully eluded German U-boats during the trans-Atlantic crossing and overcome the reservations of major museum directors, the paintings in the exhibitions introduced more than 100.000 visitors to the nuances of a country which was then largely unknown. Attended by such major intellectuals as T.S. Eliot and H.G. Wells, the show was a major success, resulting in several new acquisitions by British museums.

 

 

Click here to read an extensive review of this exhibition on Apollo, or visit the exhibition’s website.

The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War’ is at the Sala Brasil Arts Centre, Embassy of Brazil, until 22 June.