Tag Archives: art history

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New Exhibition and CEEH Publication: VALENTÍN CARDERERA Y SOLANO, Biblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid, September 27, 2019 – January 12, 2020

VALENTÍN CARDERERA Y SOLANO (Huesca, 1796 – Madrid, 1880) was a painter, scholar, communicator, collector and traveller. His life was marked by his efforts to safeguard Spain’s historical heritage and he journeyed around much of the Spanish mainland to bear witness in his drawings and watercolours to significant monuments, many at risk of disappearance as a result of the modernising drive ushered in by the new liberal order. Member of the Romantic generation and friends with the Madrazo family, Carderera was also in contact with some other figures like Richard Ford and Prosper Mérimée, with whom he shared the same nostalgia for the past and the need to define his position in the complex debate between tradition and progress.

The exhibition—featuring more than a hundred pieces including paintings, drawings, engravings, manuscripts, books, maps and objects—pays tribute to Carderera’s work and the significant legacy he left in the Biblioteca Nacional de España. In 1867 the Spanish State adquired his collection of drawings and prints: more than 45.000 pieces which enriched the department of Fine Arts with engravings of Mantegna, Dürer and Rembrandt, among others, along with one of the very few drawings attributed to Velázquez. Click here for more information.

The exhibition opens on 27 September in the Biblioteca Nacional de España’s Sala Hipóstila. It was curated by José María Lanzarote Guiral and organised by the Biblioteca Nacional de España and Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica.

It is accompanied by a an exhibition catalogue which reconstructs Carderera’s intense life in six thematic sections, published by CEEH. Until 25 September, the catalogue can be purchased from the CEEH website at special discount price. Click here for more information.

Workshop: Science and Nature in Latin America (18th–20th century), University College London, 17 September, 15:00–17:00

Science and nature event poster

In the context of Latin America, traditional History of Science discourses have tended to focus on European actors and their agency. This interdisciplinary workshop will elucidate new and emerging perspectives on the history and theories of science, nature, and the enviornment in the region. By doing so, the workshop hopes to further develop the critical discussion around knowledge production and transfer in Latin America. Our speakers will all offer responses to the following key questions, using examples from their own research:

What can your research say about hierarchies of power and knowledge in Latin America?

What does the History of Science and Nature in Latin America say or contribute to the history of the region in a broader sense?

Participants:

Nicola Miller (UCL)

Helen Cowie (University of York)

Lesley Wylie (University of Leicester)

Sophie Brockmann (De Montfort University)

Ximena Urbina (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso)

A discussion will follow the individual presentations, and the event will conclude with a free drinks reception. All welcome.

This event is organised by Elizabeth Chant. Please contact natalia.gandara.16@ucl.ac.uk or elizabeth.chant.17@ucl.ac.uk for further information. Free and open to all, please click here to book your place.

Thoma Foundation Grants in Spanish Colonial Art, deadline 25 October 2019

MARILYNN THOMA FELLOWSHIP IN SPANISH COLONIAL ART

The Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation offers Pre-doctoral and Post-doctoral fellowships annually in support of projects and research initiatives that will advance the field of Spanish colonial art. The Marilynn Thoma Fellowship is the only unrestricted research funding in the United States devoted exclusively to the field of Spanish Colonial art. Scholars may come from any discipline, but all projects must relate to the study of art and art history. Exceptionally accomplished scholars holding an MA may also apply. International scholars, particularly from Latin America, are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Applicants should propose projects that exhibit original scholarship and/or will make a significant contribution to the understanding of colonial Spanish American art and its history. Fellowships range in duration from one to two years, and eventuate in major measurable outcomes, including museum exhibitions, dissertations, book publications, scholarly essays, and lecture series. Projects will be considered from all of Spanish colonial Latin America and the Caribbean, however the Foundation will give strong preference to projects that make specific contributions to the history of painting and sculpture in colonial South America. 

Pre-doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship–$45,000 (1–year award) 

Post-doctoral Fellowship–$60,000/year (1–2 year award; indicate project length in application)
*Applicants should hold a PhD conferred between 2009-2019 

Applications are open from May 15 to October 25, 2019. Click here for more information.


THOMA FOUNDATION RESEARCH AND TRAVEL AWARDS IN SPANISH COLONIAL ART

Congruent with the Marilynn Thoma Fellowship, the Thoma Foundation offers annual grants to scholars, curators, art historians and advanced graduate students working on MA or PhD dissertations in support of projects and research initiatives that will advance the field of colonial art of Spanish America. These grants are meant to help defray the costs of research-related expenses. Funding is provided each year to several scholars selected by an international jury of undisclosed experts in the field, with travel commencing within one year + one month from the date of notification. 

Grants of up to $25,000 are available for projects lasting up to six months. 

Applications are open from May 15 to October 25, 2019. Click here for more information.

Click here for the Thoma Foundation website

Lecture: ‘Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance’, by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, Conference Room 1, National Gallery, London, 4 September 2019, 2:30–3:30pm

ARTES committee member Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, assistant curator of the exhibition “Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance” at The National Gallery, will give a lecture on the life and works of this Spanish painter.

Bartolomé Bermejo was a fifteenth-century Spanish artist whose painting technique, mixing Spanish and Netherlandish features, was unparalleled amongst his Iberian contemporaries. He had a limited output of less than twenty paintings of which seven are featured in the current National Gallery exhibition. This is the first time that six of these paintings are shown in the UK and the restoration of the National Gallery’s painting of Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil (1468) has enabled the Gallery to showcase Bermejo’s earliest masterpiece. Following the two major Bermejo retrospectives at the Prado Museum and the MNAC (Barcelona), this exhibition features paintings ranging from different periods of Bermejo’s career demonstrating his development as he moved throughout the Crown of Aragon (mostly encompassing territories in eastern Spain). This talk will focus on the seven paintings shown in the exhibition considering them within their context and retracing Bermejo’s artistic career. Bermejo’s Saint Michael, the Acqui Terme triptych and the Desplà Pietà (reproduced above), will receive special attention in the lecture, which will compare their donors, production, intended location and historical context.

This event is for a general audience and is organised by the Instituto Cervantes — London. Free, reistration required. Click here to register.

Featured Exhibition: ‘De Mena, Murillo, Zurbarán. Masters of the Spanish Baroque’, Sint-Janshospitaal, Bruges, until 6 October and MNHA, Luxembourg, 24 January–07 June 2020

20 works of Spanish religious sculpture and painting are currently on display in the monumental wards of the ancient hospital of Bruges. It is a rare opportunity to become acquainted with some lesser-known aspects of Spain’s Golden Age. The highlight of the exhibition, in addition to paintings by famous Spanish masters like Murillo and Zurbaran, is a group of six hyper-realistic sculptures by the greatest sculptor of the Spanish Baroque, Pedro de Mena.
This project is in collaboration with the Luxemburg Musée National d’Histoire et d’Art and the exhibition will travel to this museum in 2020.
The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue in English, with texts by Ruud Priem, Sibylla Goegebuer, Malgorzata Nowara, Gilles Zeimat, and Noël Geirnaert. Click here for more information on the exhibition and here for the catalogue.

News on Journals: Latin American and Latinx Visual Culture/Metropolitan Museum Journal

Latin American and Latinx Visual Culture is a quarterly peer-reviewed journal dedicated to publishing the most current international research on the visual culture of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean, as well as that created in diaspora. A defining focus of the journal is its concentration of current scholarship on both Latin American and Latinx visual culture in a single publication. The journal aims to approach ancient, colonial, modern and contemporary Latin American and Latinx visual culture from a range of interdisciplinary methodologies and perspectives. The journal was first published in January 2019, and three issues are now available on the journal’s website.

The Metropolitan Museum Journal presents richly illustrated studies of works in the Museum’s collection, including prominent as well as lesser known pieces, and relating them to works in other collections. The journal’s editorial board has recently announced that starting with volume 55, authors who publish in the Metropolitan Museum Journal (MMJ) will no longer be responsible to provide or pay for high-resolution images. The editorial office at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will acquire all high-resolution images and obtain English-language, world publication rights for print and electronic editions of MMJ. Journal authors will no longer need to spend time and effort on securing images. Click here for more information on this innovative policy.