Tag Archives: PhD

Fellowships for Spanish Colonial Art

 

brooklyn_museum_-_virgin_of_carmel_saving_souls_in_purgatory_-_circle_of_diego_quispe_tito_-_overall

Virgin of Carmel Saving Souls in Purgatory, Peru. Circle of Diego Quispe Tito, 17th century, collection of the Brooklyn Museum

Marilynn Thoma Fellowship 

The Marilynn Thoma Fellowship is the only unrestricted research funding in the United States devoted exclusively to the field of Spanish Colonial art. Each year from May 1 to October 15, pre- and post-doctoral scholars from across the world are invited to apply for research support in the amounts of $45,000 and $60,000, respectively. Recipients are selected by an international jury of three undisclosed experts in the field and notified in mid-December, with travel commencing within 18 months following notification. Selected scholars design their research projects independently, using funding in any reasonable way to accomplish their goals.

Fellowships range in duration from one to two years, and eventuate in major measurable outcomes, including museum exhibitions, dissertations, book publications, scholarly essays, and lecture series. While proposals are accepted from all of Spanish colonial Latin America and the Caribbean, the Foundation gives strong preference to projects that contribute to the history of painting and sculpture in colonial South America.

To apply, please complete the application via Slideroom.
Research and Travel Awards in Spanish Colonial Art 

Congruent with the Marilynn Thoma Fellowship, applications for the Thoma Foundation Research and Travel Awards in Spanish Colonial art are open from May 1 to October 15 of every year. Awards of up to $15,000 are available to independent scholars and advanced graduate students completing MA or PhD dissertations to help defray the costs of research-related expenses. Funding is provided each year to several scholars selected by an international jury of undisclosed experts in the field, with travel commencing within one year + one month from the date of notification. The Awards support research projects ranging in duration from 1 week to 3 months.

To apply, please complete the application via Slideroom.

Please contact info@thomafoundation.org if you have questions.

Advertisements

Doctoral Studentship for Spanish Architecture at the University of Warwick

zamora_15825The university of Warwick is offering a Doctoral Studentship to a UK/EU candidate, focusing on ‘Petrifying Wealth: Religious buildings in Zamora, 11th-13th Centuries: building processes, forms and functions’

Outline of the project 

The construction of churches or church buildings is obviously as old as the dominance of Christianity in Western societies. The petrification of ecclesiastical wealth, however, implied a more recognisable and enduring presence for this institution throughout the medieval landscape, both urban and rural. The building of churches, and to a lesser extent monasteries, was also promoted by the laity. These were initiatives and investments that were partly religious in origin, in so far as they were ways to ensure the eternal salvation of the founders or of the community involved. The proliferation of masonry-built churches may also raise the question of other objectives of the secular world. Sometimes the laity invested in churches to provide a new, or at least a stronger, more formalised and more recognizable community identity.

Aims and Objectives
The aims and objectives therefore constitute four research strands:

• Contribution to the analysis of the material evidence both on a macro scale and regionally. Census and systematization through a database of churches in the regions selected through a Geographic Information System (GIS).

• Census and chronology of the foundations of family churches, paying particular attention to those endowed by women.

• Estimation of construction costs. Evaluation of aspects related to the production and transport of the materials used, the distance from the quarries of origin, the use of new stone and the reuse of old materials.

• Testing of the hypotheses concerning the functionality and use of the elements of the churches.

Methodology
Fieldwork in Zamora will identify the buildings that will form the focus of the study and these will then be examined archaeologically to determine the materials and the means of construction. Particular attention will focus on the precise recording of masons’ marks and on the compilation of a database of these marks and their locations for each building. These databases will be integrated into the larger database of the whole Petrifying Wealth project.

Outcome
The research will make a substantial contribution to the overall project and will form a discrete section of the database of material relating both to Spain and to the wider context of the project. It will inform further debate on the construction of stone buildings in medieval Europe and the means and methods of construction.

Studentship
The PhD studentship will be based at the CSIC in Madrid, and at the University of Warwick and will be supervised by Dr Therese Martin (CSIC) and Dr Jenny Alexander.

The student will be based in Madrid, have the status of a pre-doctoral fellow at the CSIC and will be expected to participate in CSIC activities. Although English is widely used at the CSIC, working knowledge of Spanish will be needed. Supervisions, by Skype and in person, will be at Warwick.

Applications are welcome from Students from the UK and the EU.

The studentship will cover home/EU fees (full time) and a stipend for UK students or EU students of 22,350 euros, rising to 27,000 euros per annum for three years.

Candidates ideally should have a First Class Honours degree in History of Art or a related discipline and a distinction-level Masters degree in History of Art or a related discipline.

Applications should include a statement of not more than 1,000 words indicating what skills and experience they will bring to the project, a current CV, a transcript of qualifications to date (and anticipated results if you are still studying for your MA), two letters of recommendation plus a writing sample (either a full essay or MA dissertation).

The deadline for applications is March 31st 2018 with interviews to be held in April 2018.

Applications should be made via the University of Warwick online application form.

Please make clear in your online application that you are applying for the Petrifying Wealth studentship.

If you wish to discuss the project in more details please email jennifer.alexander@warwick.ac.uk

Training and Support
Training needs will be assessed immediately after appointment as the level and type of training required will depend on the focus of the research proposal and the skills that the student brings to the discipline.

The student will also be able to participate in workshops offered by Warwick’s Centre for Advanced Doctoral Research Excellence (CADRE) and courses in information technology provided by Warwick’s IT services.

At the beginning of year 2 and 3 a review of training needs will be undertaken by the supervisors, and the regular supervision meetings will monitor this and identify any additional requirements.

Dissemination Plans
The research findings will be disseminated via a 80,000 word doctoral thesis, conference papers, and future publications such as articles, to be submitted beyond the completion date of the project. The results will be incorporated in the Petrifying Wealth database as part of a continuing research resource.

The Maius Workshop’s Second Meeting: Sacred Encounters, 11 December 2017 6-7:30pm, The Courtauld Institute of Art

Morgan Beatus Angel Sun Rev 19The Maius Workshop is an interdisciplinary group that brings together graduate students and early-career scholars dealing with Hispanic art (broadly considered to include literature, theatre, music, etc.) and history from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period. The Maius Workshop is kindly supported by ARTES.

The first meeting of the Maius Workshop took place in October at the Warburg Institute. The Maius Workshop’s second meeting will take place on Monday 11 December 2017 from 6.00 to 7.30 pm at the Research Forum Seminar Room of the Courtauld Institute.

We hope attendees will share documents, images and problems from their research related to this topic. While some members have already volunteered to present their research, there are still a few spaces left for informal presentations of 5 to 10 minutes. If you would like to present material from your research, please get in touch with us by Friday 8 December. 

If you are interested in presenting your evidence, please drop us an email by Friday 8 December. You can present your evidence in Powerpoint or handout format. If you would like us to print out your evidence to share with the group, please email it to us by Saturday 9. Secondary readings for discussion are also very welcome.

Otherwise, please come along for a lively discussion!

If you are planning to attend this event, please register on Eventbrite at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-maius-workshop-2nd-meeting-11-december-2017-tickets-39407191972

If you wish to contact us please use our email address, maiusworkshop@gmail.com

For more info visit: https://maiusworkshop.wordpress.com/ or https://www.facebook.com/groups/120148888676292/

The Maius Workshop’s first meeting: report

MaiusfirstmeetingThe first meeting of the Maius Workshop took place last Monday, 16 October, at the Warburg Institute. It was a well-attended event where we presented the aims of the research group, discussed our shared interests and needs and shared ideas about the most useful format for future sessions.

The Maius Workshop aims to bring together young researchers (MAs, PhDs and early career academics) working on Iberian and Latin American topics. It aims to create a collaborative network of researchers where shared problems and research obstacles can be discussed informally, and where personal encounters can foster interdisciplinary collaboration.

During our first meeting we decided that the network will:

  1. Share training resources and specific knowledge on e.g. archives, museum collections, languages, paleography…both in person during our meetings and online through our website.
  2. Offer an online platform for members to present themselves and their work on the web.
  3. Favour the creation of spin-off subject specific events to better cater to members’ very wid
    e interests.
  4. Run general meetings where members will have an opportunity to present problematic documents and objects from their current research in a friendly, collaborative and creative environment.

The first of these meetings, loosely titles ‘Sacred Encounters,’ will take place on 11 December (place TBC). Further information on this event will soon be published on our website. If you are interested in discussing your research at this event, please contact maiusworkshop@gmail.com.

 

Introducing the Maius Workshop

Morgan Beatus Angel Sun Rev 19The Maius Workshop is an interdisciplinary group that brings together graduate students and early career scholars dealing with Hispanic art (broadly considered to include literature, theatre, music, etc.) and history from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period. The aim of the Maius Workshop is to encourage dialogue among specialists in different stages of their academic life and to provide a forum for discussing methods of information gathering and research news. The group is kindly supported by ARTES.

The workshop is named after the tenth-century painter of the Morgan Beatus manuscript as it wishes to create an interdisciplinary space where scholars of art and history can interact. Through a series of reading group meetings, the Workshop aims to bring together young researchers tackling the study of Hispanic culture and history and to create a strong network of specialists of Medieval and Early Modern Iberia and Latin America.

Thanks to the new connections that the group will create, the meetings will develop current research rather than present finished projects. The group’s activities are directed to the diffusion of the interest in Iberian and Latin American cultural creations, with the long-term aim of establishing a permanent community open to all students of Hispanic art and history.

The Maius Workshop’s first meeting will take place on Monday 16 October at 6 pm at the Warburg Institute. This will be an informal meeting and an opportunity to meet postgraduate researchers with similar interests, to discuss how these interests can be drawn together in a reading group setting. The meeting is open to MA, PhD and early career researchers. Refreshments will be provided.

If you are interested in the activities of this research group or would like to attend the meeting, please fill in this form