Tag Archives: Oxford

ARTES event: Picturing a New World – Cortés – Moctezuma, 1519–2019: A Special Study Afternoon and Conversation

A guest post by Anna Espinola Lynn and Clare Hills-Nova

On 23 October, 2019, ARTES, together with the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford, hosted a transdisciplinary session at the University’s Weston Library, focusing on Mesoamerican manuscripts. The event was designed to mark the 500th anniversary of the historic meeting between the Spanish explorer Hernán Cortés (1485–1547) and the Aztec ruler Moctezuma the Younger (1466–1520), just outside Tenochtitlan (now Mexico City), on 8 November 1519. Attendees included students, academics and representatives of other cultural institutions.

Attendance at this exclusive event was by invitation only. Would you like to take part in similar visits in the future? Join ARTES today!

MS. Arch. Selden. A. 72 (3). Image courtesy the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

The afternoon began in the Weston Library’s Visiting Scholars’ Centre. On view were the Selden Roll (MS. Arch. Selden. A. 72 (3)) alongside two modern books produced by Alfonso García Tellez, using the traditional, amate paper-based techniques evidenced by rare Pre-Hispanic codices and rolls.

The session began with Sir John Elliott’s essay on the Cortez-Moctezuma encounter before moving on to presentations by Giuseppe Marcocci (University of Oxford), Emily Floyd (UCL), and the Bodleian Libraries’ Head of Conservation, Virginia Lladó-Buisán. 

Giuseppe followed Sir John’s paper with a consideration of the roles vision and visual culture took on in the encounter between the Spanish visitors and the Mexica. Turning to contemporary accounts of the encounter that emphasize vision, as well as representations of the imagined or real Other, Giuseppe pointed to visual asymmetries active in colonial contexts as they participated in relations of power. 

Emily, meanwhile, provided a reading of the pre-colonial Selden Roll as it expressed the formation of a new cycle of rule in central Mexico. She discussed the multiplicity of ways the Roll can be read, and invited further conversation as to possible representations of time, succession, generation and regeneration. Regarding the name of the Selden Roll, Emily noted that this was associated  with its colonial history of collecting more than with the Roll’s actual content, commenting that ‘The Roll of New Fire’ had recently been adopted as a more appropriate title for it. 

Virginia followed up with insights into the processes and materials used in creating the Roll, drawing upon the results of recent research. Participants in this session had the unique pleasure of getting up close to the Selden Roll and asking those experts present questions about anything from shifts in hue or line quality, to contexts of production in pre-colonial and colonial environments, and on the multivalent symbolisms in the Roll. 

Following a compelling period of conversation around and about the objects, the afternoon concluded with a visit to the Weston Library’s Talking Maps exhibition, where the Codex Mendoza (Bodleian Library MS. Arch. Selden. A. 1) was on display. Here, they were able to extend the conversation regarding the authorship, readership and linguistic referents of the pre-colonial Roll of New Fire versus the colonial era’s Mendoza Codex. 

Images courtesy the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

Save the Date: Oxford Sorolla Symposium, 1 July 2019

A symposium to accompany the National Gallery’s major exhibition “Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light” (18 March–7th July 2019) will take place on at the Lecture Theatre, Weston Library, on 1 July 2019. The programme will include guest speakers such as Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery, Richard Ormond, former Deputy Director of the National Portrait Gallery, Blanca Pons-Sorolla, co-curator of the exhibition and Sorolla’s great grand-daughter, amongst others. The symposium will be followed by a musical soirée and the projection of the award-winning “Sorolla: Viajes de la luz” documentary at St Cross College and Pusey Chapel, Oxford.

Detailed information will be posted shortly.

Funding: I.M. Pei Graduate Scholarship in Islamic Art and Architecture (Oxford)

The Khalili Research Centre (University of Oxford) is offering a fully-funded graduate scholarship from the beginning of the academic year 2019–2020 for a student undertaking either doctoral research or a combined four-year programme consisting of a Master’s course proceeding to a D.Phil.

The Scholarship is awarded on the basis of academic merit and potential. The Scholarship will cover full course fees, and maintenance costs equivalent to the U.K. national minimum doctoral stipend. Applicants should first consult the Further Particulars that may be downloaded here.

Applicants, whether internal or external, should then apply to the University under the standard procedures for graduate degrees. The University’s application procedures are described at http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate. Applications should be made on-line (www.graduate.ox.ac.uk/applyonline) and submitted before 12:00 noon on Friday 11 January 2019.

Applicants to the M.St., M.Phil. or D.Phil in Islamic Art and Archaeology at the Khalili Research Centre may also be considered for other fully-funded scholarships. For further details, please visit: https://krc.web.ox.ac.uk/article/courses

ARTES AGM and Prize-Giving Ceremony Report, Oxford, 14 June 2018

home2On 14 June 2018 ARTES held its AGM and prize-giving ceremony in Oxford. It was a day packed with special visits to rarely-seen collections of Spanish art in the city. The day started at Campion Hall, a Jesuit private hall which hosts a fascinating private collection of religious art from Europe, Latin America, and from Christian missions elsewhere in the world.

The visit was followed by the group’s annual general meeting and prize-giving ceremony, held at the Taylorian, Oxford University’s centre for the study of Modern European languages and literatures. Artes presented the following prizes:

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Artes’ honorary president, Sir John Elliott (Regius Professor Emeritus, University of Oxford) with some of the prize winners

The Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal
Awarded to Javier Vicente Arenas (MA Student, Warburg Institute, London), for his essay titled Constructing a ‘Transmediterranean’ Identity: Rodrigo de Borgia’s Italian Angels in Valencia Cathedral (1472-81)

Prizes were also presented to two runners-up: Jamie Haskell (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay titled The Hispano-Moresque Haggadah and Helena Haugli (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay The Botella de Astorga Reliquary and the Transfer, Functions, and Meanings of a Fatimid Rock Crystal in Remote Christian Spain. 

ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholarships

Travel scholarships were awarded to:

Susy Oram, who will travel to Mexico to study Mudéjar art and architecture in the region during the viceregal period.

 

Danielle Smith, CEEH/David Wilkie Scholar for the Study of Spanish Art at the University of Edinburgh, who will travel to Madrid to carry out research for her PhD dissertation, titled ‘Colecciones de Trajes de España: exploring sartorial representation in Spanish printed books, 1777-1825′
Elizabeth Chant, a PhD candidate at the School of European Languages, Cultures, and Society, UCL, who will travel to Seville and Madrid to research ‘Illuminating the Map: Spanish Enlightenment Cartography of the Costa Patagónica
Stefanie Lenk, a curator and PhD candidate at the University of Oxford, who is studying the re-use of Roman altars in paleochristian and Visigothic churches in Spain.
 
This scholarship was awarded to Sylvia Alvares-Correa, who is working on a PhD titled ‘From Flanders to Portugal: the transmission of northern art, artists, and techniques to Portugal through the collection of Rainha Dona Leonor’s (1458-1525)’ at the university of Oxford.

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The day continued with a visit to Magdalen College, founded by William Waynflete in 1458. The College holds wide-ranging art collections, including a Spanish altarpiece representing  Christ Carrying the Cross in the College Chapel. Previously attributed to Valdés Leal, the work, which remains unstudied, was more likely produced by another Sevillian painter in seventeenth century.

Lecture: Barbaro Martinez-Ruiz, The Impossible Reflection: A New Approach to African Themes in Wifredo Lam’s Art (Cuba, 1902-1982), Oxford, 8 February 2018

Wifredo Lam, The Jungle, 1943, MOMA, New York

Thursday 08 February 2018, 5 pm, University of Oxford, Latin American Centre Seminar Room, 1 Church Walk, Oxford

Bárbaro Martínez-Ruiz (B.A the University of Havana, Ph.D. Yale University, 2004), is an Art Historian with expertise in African and Caribbean artistic, visual and religious practices, whose work challenges traditional disciplinary boundaries and examines the varied understandings of – and engagement with – ‘art’ and ‘visual culture’. Following professorships at Havana’s High Institute of Art from 1993-1997, the Rhode Island School of Design from 2002-2004 and Stanford University from 2004-2013, Martinez-Ruiz joined the University of Cape Town, where he has served as the head of the Art History and Discourse of Art Department since 2013. He is the 2017-2018 recipient of the Leverhulme Visiting Professorship, hosted by Oxford’s School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, and a Senior Fellow at St Antony’s College. His books include Kongo Graphic Writing and Other Narratives of the Sign, Temple University Press, 2013 (English) and El Colegio de México, 2012 (Spanish); Faisal Abdu’Allah: On the Art of Dislocation, Atlantic Center of Modern Art Press, 2012 and Art and Emancipation in Jamaica: Isaac Mendes Belisario and his Worlds, Yale University Press, 2007, for which he received the College Art Association Alfred H. Barr Award. Other recent publications include Ma kisi Nsi: L’art de habitants de region de Mbanza Kongo, in Angola figures de pouvoir. (Paris: Dapper Museum Press, 2010); Writing Bodies in the Bakongo Atlantic Experience, in Performances: Challenges for Art and Anthropology. (Quai Branly Museum Press, 2010); Funerary Pots of the Kongo in Central Africa, in African Terra Cotta: A Millenary Heritage. (Geneva: Musee Barbier Mueller Press, 2008), The Impossible Reflection: A New Approach to African Themes in Wifredo Lam’s Art, in Wifredo Lam. (Miami: Perez Art Museum Press, 2008). In addition to his research and teaching, Martinez-Ruiz is an active curator, whose shows have explored issues of visual communication, dislocation and hybridity in the work of contemporary artists across the African diaspora. He also serves as an editor for the Cuban Studies Magazine and Harvard’s Transition Magazine and was a researcher for Pacific Standard Time AL at the Getty Foundation and the Museum of Latin American Art, Los Angeles California from 2014-16.

Convened by Eduardo Posada-Carbo

Light and Lighting in al-­Andalus. Tom Nickson at the Khalili Research Centre, Oxford


THE ARCHAEOLOGY AND MATERIAL CULTURE OF THE MEDIEVAL ISLAMIC WEST RESEARCH SEMINAR

Dr Tom Nickson
(London, Courtauld Institute)

‘Light and Lighting in al-­Andalus’

Tuesday, 16 May 2017
2 PM
Khalili Research Centre, University of Oxford
3 St John Street, Oxford, OX1 2LG
Lecture Room 3

Audience: Members of the University only
Booking not required

Portuguese Women Artists (Oxford)

2017-01-portuguese-women-artiststayIdentities in Transit : Portuguese Women Artists since 1950

Wadham College & Taylor Institution LIbrary, Oxford

Workshop: Wadham College, 16-18 March, 2017 (NB: This is an invitation-only event)

Exhibition: Taylor Institution Library, 10-24 March 2017
Focusing on the transnational in the life and works of Paula Rego, Ana Hatherly, Lourdes Castro, Maria Velho da Costa and Menez.

Opening times: Mon-Fri, 9:00-18:30; Sat, 10:00-15:00.