Tag Archives: Visual Culture

CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019, deadline 31 March!

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The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.

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CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019 

CANONS AND REPERTOIRES: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019 

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.

Clark Fellowships: CENTER FOR SPAIN IN AMERICA FELLOWSHIP, The Clark, deadline October 15, 2018

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The Clark Art Institute combines a public art museum with a complex of research and academic programs, including a major art history library. The Clark is an international center for discussion on the nature of art and its history.

Fellowships are awarded every year to established and promising scholars with the aim of fostering a critical commitment to inquiry in the theory, history, and interpretation of art and visual culture. In addition to providing an opportunity for sustained research for fellows, outside of their usual professional obligations, the Clark encourages them to participate in a variety of collaborative and public discussions on diverse art historical topics as well as on larger questions and motivations that shape the practice of art history.

Sponsored by the Center for Spain in America, this one-semester fellowship is intended to support the study of all aspects of Spanish art from the early medieval period to the beginning of the twentieth century, as well as the worldwide impact of Spanish art and artists. In addition to research for a publication and/or exhibition on specific artists or periods, we welcome projects examining collecting and connoisseurship of Spanish art—particularly in the Americas—and the influence and importance of Spanish art and its reception throughout the world.

Deadline: October 15, 2018

Click here for more information

Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies at Birkbeck, U of London—Deadline 15 June 2018

Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies 18-19

Birkbeck School of Arts will award one fully funded Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies beginning in 2018-19. 

We invite outstanding applicants working in one or more than one of the constituent disciplines of Renaissance Studies (ca. 1400-1670) in the School of Arts at Birkbeck. Applications are welcomed within the fields of History of Art; English Literature; Drama and Theatre Studies; Intellectual History; Early Modern French Studies; Iberian and Latin American Studies and Visual Culture. The scholarship is equally open to candidates wishing to work in interdisciplinary ways and to those located within one of the single disciplines.

Supervision in Renaissance Studies in the School of Arts is wide in scope. For a list of Renaissance Studies specialists, who can act as supervisors, please visit the academic staff pages on the School’s departmental websites.

Eligibility

Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarships are open to Home/EU and International applicants applying for a full-time or part time M.Phil/PhD place within the School of Arts, starting in the 2018/19 academic year.

Funding

The Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarship awards will include a full fee waiver capped at the value of the full-time Home/EU rate for M.Phil/PhD degrees (currently £4,260), in addition to an annual stipend set at Research Council rates (currently £16,777; pro rata in the case of a part-time award).

Duration of Awards

Scholarships will be tenable for up to three years (subject to satisfactory academic progress) for full-time students, and at an appropriate pro rata rate and extended duration for part-time students.

How to Apply – Application Process

To apply for an award please download the funding application form here.

Please note that you will also need to apply for a place on a relevant PhD programme:

M.Phil/PhD Comparative Literature

M.Phil/PhD English and Humanities

M.Phil/PhD French

M.Phil/PhD German

M.Phil/PhD History of Art

M.Phil/PhD Iberian and Latin American Studies

Please consult the general guidance on applying online for an M.Phil/PhD place. You can find the School of Arts Guide for Applicants here. All prospective students are strongly advised to first make informal contact with a potential supervisor. For information about staff and the research environment at Birkbeck, please consult the School’s Departmental webpages.

Application Deadline: 6pm 15 June 2018.

Please be advised that all applicants wishing to be considered for funding may be required to attend an interview to discuss their proposal. Interviews will be held in w/c 18 and 25 June (if not before). Results will be announced in early July 2018.

The completed form should be emailed to SoAFA@bbk.ac.uk.

If you have any enquiries about this studentship and the scope of supervision within the School of Arts, please contact Dr Luisa Calè, Assistant Dean for Postgraduate Research (l.cale@bbk.ac.uk).

CFP: Revising the Hispanic Canon. Visibility and Cultural Capital at the Margins

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CFP: Revising the Hispanic Canon. Visibility and Cultural Capital at the Margins

Deadline: 13 May 2015

In recent years, meta-critical studies such as Ideologies of Hispanism (2005), Spain Beyond Spain (2005), Reading Iberia (2007), Un hispanismo para el siglo XXI (2011) and Iberian Modalities (2013) have sought to uncover the ideological discourses underlying Hispanic Studies and trace its historical evolution in order to elucidate how the discipline might or ought to evolve, if it is to remain relevant in a context in which national, linguistic and disciplinary boundaries have become problematized. The present volume, co-edited by Stuart Davis and Maite Usoz de la Fuente, seeks to contribute to this ongoing debate by considering how the work of PhD students and early career researchers in Hispanic Studies reflects and contributes to the expansion and the blurring of disciplinary limits.
In a broad sense, the duty of every new generation of scholars in any arts and humanities discipline is to encourage a revision of the canon within that discipline and, in the process, to contribute to a redefinition of the discipline itself. This is an exciting enterprise, but it is not without its challenges and pitfalls. Amongst them is the question of how to attain visibility when working on a topic that is little known, or considered a niche area within one’s discipline, or how to position one’s work if undertaking inter- or multidisciplinary research that surpasses disciplinary boundaries. The aim of this book is to offer a useful overview of new research in Hispanic Studies by a selection of emerging scholars, and to reflect upon questions of canonicity, visibility and cultural capital, and the ways in which such notions span and contribute to shape our field of study.
Contributions to this volume are welcome from doctoral students and early career researchers (understood as those who have obtained their doctoral degree within the past seven years) whose work focuses on (but may not be limited to) the following areas:

  • Hispanism beyond Spain and Latin America: North Africa, the Philippines, and Guinea
  • Interdisciplinary crossroads: comparative and multidisciplinary approaches to Hispanic texts
  • The role of visual and popular culture within Hispanic Studies
  • Other languages and cultures (non-Castilian languages and cultures of Spain and Latin America)
  • Going against the grain: Paradigm-shifting revisions of the canon
  • New methodological approaches to canonical texts

If you want to contribute to this volume, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to hispanic.canon@gmail.com by 13 May 2015, accompanied by a short biography including your name, institutional affiliation and areas of research (2-3 lines). Selected contributors will be contacted by 30 May 2015 and the deadline for submission of essays will be 31 December 2015.