Tag Archives: Science

Workshop: Science and Nature in Latin America (18th–20th century), University College London, 17 September, 15:00–17:00

Science and nature event poster

In the context of Latin America, traditional History of Science discourses have tended to focus on European actors and their agency. This interdisciplinary workshop will elucidate new and emerging perspectives on the history and theories of science, nature, and the enviornment in the region. By doing so, the workshop hopes to further develop the critical discussion around knowledge production and transfer in Latin America. Our speakers will all offer responses to the following key questions, using examples from their own research:

What can your research say about hierarchies of power and knowledge in Latin America?

What does the History of Science and Nature in Latin America say or contribute to the history of the region in a broader sense?

Participants:

Nicola Miller (UCL)

Helen Cowie (University of York)

Lesley Wylie (University of Leicester)

Sophie Brockmann (De Montfort University)

Ximena Urbina (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso)

A discussion will follow the individual presentations, and the event will conclude with a free drinks reception. All welcome.

This event is organised by Elizabeth Chant. Please contact natalia.gandara.16@ucl.ac.uk or elizabeth.chant.17@ucl.ac.uk for further information. Free and open to all, please click here to book your place.

Advertisements

CFP: Visualizing Scientific Thinking and Religion in the Early Modern Iberian World, CAA 107th Annual Conference, New York, February 13–16, 2019

img2

Fray Bernadino de Sahagún, The Florentine Codex, 1540–85

Chairs: Brendan C. McMahon (bcmcmaho@umich.edu), Emily Floyd (emilycfloyd@gmail.com)

In recent years, the consideration of visual and material sources has greatly enriched the study of a wide range of scientific practices in the early modern period. As scholars have moved away from characterizing “art” and “science” as discrete categories, they have increasingly turned to paintings, prints, and other forms of artistic production as a means to explore how early modern actors came to understand their experiences of the natural world. While the vast majority of these studies focus on the visual and material culture of Protestant Northern Europe, a small but growing number investigate similar trends in Spain and the Spanish Americas. Yet even as scholars have turned to instances where visual thinking formed a central component of scientific practices in this region, they have been more tentative to consider how religion, and particularly Catholicism, shaped such practices in this context.
This session seeks papers that consider the intersections of visual production, scientific thinking, and religion in the early modern Iberian world, investigating such themes as:
• Material culture, techne, and artisanal epistemologies
• The mobilization of indigenous American and creole systems of natural knowledge
• The Catholic Enlightenment
• Healing, disease, and visual production
• Visual and material culture, theology, and natural philosophical argument
• Epistemic images in the early modern Iberian world
To submit a proposal, please email a 250-word abstract, CV, and proposal form to bcmcmaho@umich.edu and emilycfloyd@gmail.com by Monday August 6, 2018.

The Generation of ´14: Science and Modernity, Madrid

2014-05-Generacion_14_bne_ev.jpg_5796651The Generation of ´14: Science and Modernity – a century on, Biblioteca Nacional, Madrid, 14 March – 1 June 2014. An exhibition of almost 300 books, documents, letters, photographs, posters and art related to the generation of Spanish authors, journalists, scientists and artists, born in the 1880s and 90s, who in 1914 launched a campaign and a journal (España) aiming to modernize Spanish intellectual and cultural life by turning to Europe – Germany, France and Britain – as inspiration. The men and some feminist-inspired women were led by Ortega y Gasset and the doctor and historian Gregorio Marañon and portrayed by artists such as José Gutiérrez Solana and Ignacio Zuloaga.