Tag Archives: Latin America

Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.

News from the world of Hispanic art

Many things happened last week in the world of Spanish and Latin American visual culture.

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The Prado’s Jeronimos Wing. Photo by Luis García on Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0.

London’s Sir John Soane Museum announced a new series of annual lectures and prizes intended to raise the profile of architects, artists and writers who broadened society’s understanding of architecture and the built environment. The inaugural lecture, scheduled for November 1 at the Royal Institution in London, will be delivered by Rafael Moneo, designer of the Prado’s Jeronimos Extension, which opened in 2007. As reported by The Art Newspaper, Moneo will be awarded the Soane Medal, a copy of the medal presented in 1835 to Sir John Soane by “the Architects of England”, in recognition of his “essential services to architecture”.

 

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Francis Bacon, Triptych, 1991, oil on linen, 198.1 x 147.6 cm, MOMA Museum, New York. Credit: William A. M. Burden Fund and Nelson A. Rockefeller Bequest Fund (both by exchange); © 2017 Estate of Francis Bacon/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London.

On 21 July The Art Newspaper reported that Spanish Police recovered three paintings by Francis Bacon stolen from the private collection of Bacon’s acquaintance José Capelo in Madrid in 2015. A tip-off from the Art Loss Register enabled the recovery, which follows the arrest of ten people associated with the robbery in the past two years. Bacon portrayed Capelo in a work of 1987 now owned by the Swiss Galerie Gmurzynska and in one of his last paintings, the 1991 Triptych now at the MOMA.

 

 

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Lygia Pape, installation shot of Ttéia I, C, 2002, at the 53rd Biennal of Venice. Jean-Pierre Dalbéra on Flickr.

A less positive news comes from US District Court for the Southern District of New York. The daughter of Brazilian artist Lygia Pape, whose monographic exhibition A Multitude of Forms closed yesterday at Met Breuer, has sued LG Electronics, several retailers and Getty Images Korea for copyright infringement. According to the complainants, LG Electronics approached the Pape estate (Projeto Lygia Pape) to license her work Ttéia (2003), which they wished to use as default wallpaper and packaging for their new phone K20 V. Pape’s estate refused LG’s request, citing the artist’s life-long resistance to the commercialisation of her work. Nevertheless, LG persevered in their use of the image, using a too-close unauthorized derivation of the work on the phone’s wallpaper and packaging. As a result, Pape’s daughter has asked the Court to recall the packaging, advertising, and other materials that contain the infringing image, including the phone itself if necessary. As noted by the plantiffs’ lawyer John Cahill, ‘This is an extreme, perhaps unique, case in which a multinational corporation—fully aware that it was doing wrong—abused a work of fine art in the service of the profit motive.’ A positive resolution of the case may ensure better protection for artists’ rights in the future.

 

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Salvador Dalí in 1965. Roger Higgins, Library of Congress, New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection. Wikimedia Commons.

To end on a lighter note, Dalí’s famously exuberant mustache is still in perfect shape, almost 30 years after the artist’s passing. The information was reported by Narcís Bardalet, the embalmer who took care of the Surrealist’s body after his death in 1989, following the exhumation of Dalí’s corpse last week. Ordered by a Spanish Court, the exhumation will enable a DNA examination to determine whether María Pilar Abel Martínez is an illegitimate daughter of the artist, as she claims since 2007.

 

VIA Arts Prize, 2017 Edition

image003VIA Arts Prize: deadline 16th October 2017
The Embassies of Latin American countries, Spain and Portugal, in collaboration with Itaú Unibanco and supported by People’s Palace Projects (Queen Mary University of London), are delighted to launch the 2017 edition of the VIA Arts Prize.
In an unparalleled exchange between the UK and Latin cultures, this dedicated visual arts competition invites all UK-based artists to enter into a creative dialogue with Ibero-American art and artists. Following the pre-selection process conducted by the curatorial committee, up to 30 artworks will then go on display for three weeks at the Embassy of Brazil. A special jury will judge the final selection.
Please find full information at the contest website. Submissions for the competition, which may include paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography and prints, are now invited from artists living and working in the UK. Participants must be aged 16 or over.
We encourage you to participate in this contest and there are several ways in which you can get involved:
·         Applying if you have an artistic vein;
·         Sharing this opportunity;
·         Attending the finalists’ exhibition in November to vote for your favourite.
The prizes are: 1st Prize £5,000 and a solo exhibition at the Embassy of Brazil; 2nd Prize £2,000.
The exhibition will be at the Embassy of Brazil in London from the 3rd – 23rd November 2017.
For further information please contact:
Andrzej Stuart-Thompson (English)
Ana Elizabeth González (Spanish)

Marcio Junji Sono (Portuguese)

 

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 2018)

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Diego Rivera, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, 1931, SFAI, San Francisco

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 18)

Deadline: 7 August 2017

The Art History of Latin America has been written, for the most part,  in the 20th and 21st century.  As a discipline it is the product of two distinct points of view: the individual countries’ national art histories and visions generated from other regions, which privilege supra-national conceptions of geography and identity. Be they the Hispanic art histories of the 1930s, the North American passion for Mexican muralism of the 1930s, the European interests in alternative forms of Baroque in the post Second World War period, or the high modernist interpretations of modern art in Latin America during the post-War period, the discipline of art history has been shaped by scholarship generated outside the region, as much as from the scholarship generated within it. In this panel we invite scholars to study the effects of a globalized perspective on Latin American Art History, specifically by analyzing the contributions of other regions to the understanding of the concept of Latin American art.  We welcome papers studying any of the topics above, as well as the recent histories that stress critical notions such as race, gender and class to create new readings of Latin American Art History.

To submit a paper proposal, please send a 100-200 word abstract and a c.v. to Michele Greet (mgreet@gmu.edu) and Mercedes Trelles (MERCEDESTRELLES@AOL.COM) by August 7, 2017. Submissions for session proposals are due to LASA by Sept. 7. We will inform you of your acceptance prior to that date so that papers that cannot be included in the panel may be submitted individually.

New book: The Casa del Deán: New World Imagery in a Sixteenth-Century Mexican Mural Cycle

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The Casa del Deán: New World Imagery in a Sixteenth-Century Mexican Mural Cycle, by Penny C. Morrill
(Austin: University of Texas Press, December 2014)
ISBN: 978-0-292-75930-5 (Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Series in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture)
“Extensively illustrated with new color photographs, this pioneering study of a masterpiece of colonial Latin American art reveals how a cathedral dean and native American painters drew on their respective visual traditions to promote Christian faith in the New World.”

CFP: Revising the Hispanic Canon. Visibility and Cultural Capital at the Margins

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CFP: Revising the Hispanic Canon. Visibility and Cultural Capital at the Margins

Deadline: 13 May 2015

In recent years, meta-critical studies such as Ideologies of Hispanism (2005), Spain Beyond Spain (2005), Reading Iberia (2007), Un hispanismo para el siglo XXI (2011) and Iberian Modalities (2013) have sought to uncover the ideological discourses underlying Hispanic Studies and trace its historical evolution in order to elucidate how the discipline might or ought to evolve, if it is to remain relevant in a context in which national, linguistic and disciplinary boundaries have become problematized. The present volume, co-edited by Stuart Davis and Maite Usoz de la Fuente, seeks to contribute to this ongoing debate by considering how the work of PhD students and early career researchers in Hispanic Studies reflects and contributes to the expansion and the blurring of disciplinary limits.
In a broad sense, the duty of every new generation of scholars in any arts and humanities discipline is to encourage a revision of the canon within that discipline and, in the process, to contribute to a redefinition of the discipline itself. This is an exciting enterprise, but it is not without its challenges and pitfalls. Amongst them is the question of how to attain visibility when working on a topic that is little known, or considered a niche area within one’s discipline, or how to position one’s work if undertaking inter- or multidisciplinary research that surpasses disciplinary boundaries. The aim of this book is to offer a useful overview of new research in Hispanic Studies by a selection of emerging scholars, and to reflect upon questions of canonicity, visibility and cultural capital, and the ways in which such notions span and contribute to shape our field of study.
Contributions to this volume are welcome from doctoral students and early career researchers (understood as those who have obtained their doctoral degree within the past seven years) whose work focuses on (but may not be limited to) the following areas:

  • Hispanism beyond Spain and Latin America: North Africa, the Philippines, and Guinea
  • Interdisciplinary crossroads: comparative and multidisciplinary approaches to Hispanic texts
  • The role of visual and popular culture within Hispanic Studies
  • Other languages and cultures (non-Castilian languages and cultures of Spain and Latin America)
  • Going against the grain: Paradigm-shifting revisions of the canon
  • New methodological approaches to canonical texts

If you want to contribute to this volume, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to hispanic.canon@gmail.com by 13 May 2015, accompanied by a short biography including your name, institutional affiliation and areas of research (2-3 lines). Selected contributors will be contacted by 30 May 2015 and the deadline for submission of essays will be 31 December 2015.

Glitterati: Portraits & Jewelry from Colonial Latin America, Denver

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Glitterati: Portraits & Jewelry from Colonial Latin America. Exhibition, Denver Art Museum, 7 December 2014 – 27 February 2016.
During the Spanish Colonial period in Latin America (1521–1850), precious gold and silver were crafted into elegant jewelry then embellished with emeralds from Colombia, coral from Mexico, and pearls from Venezuela. Displaying their wealth and status, people were painted wearing their finest dress and elaborate jewelry.