Tag Archives: Latin America

Featured Exhibition: The Avant-garde Networks of Amauta: Argentina, Mexico, and Peru in the 1920s, Museo Nacional Reina Sofía, Madrid, until 27 May 2019

José Sabogal, Cover of the journal Amauta, n. 26 (September – October), 1929, Journal, Museo de Arte de Lima

Founded and directed by José Carlos Mariátegui, the Peruvian magazine Amauta was one of the most influential cultural and political periodicals of the early 20th century. The exhibition of more than 250 works follows Amauta’s development as a platform to explore the diversity of the avant-garde artistic production in Peru, Argentina, and Mexico and the debates that shaped the art of Latin America during the 1920s. This exhibition, organised by Beverly Adams, Curator of Latin American Art, Blanton Museum of Art, and Natalia Majluf, Director and Chief Curator, Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru addresses the avant-garde production of a vast network of artists and writers connected with Amauta. and includes works in a variety of forms ranging from paintings, drawings, sculptures and photographs through to popular ceramics, many by lesser known artists as well as pieces by Tina Modotti and Diego Rivera. A large network of correspondents in Latin America and Europe fed the magazine, which had a print run of 3-4,000, and gave Amauta an international impact.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

The exhibition will travel from Madrid to the Museo de Arte de Lima (20 June – 22 September 2019); the Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City (17 October 2019 – 12 January 2020); and finally to Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin, Texas (February 16, 2020 – 17 May, 2020).

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News: ‘Dallas Museum of Art boosts Latin American focus with new curator and acquisitions’

A carpet fragment with double-headed bird, probably made in Peru in the 17th century. Gifted to the DMA from the de Unger family

As reported by The Art Newspaper, the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) is looking to enlarge its Latin American art collection. The museum has created a new endowed curatorial post, the Jorge Baldor Curator of Latin American Art, currently open for applications. It has also made significant new acquisitions of art from the region, from a 17th-century Peruvian carpet to artworks by Mexican artists Miguel Covarrubias, José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera, and Chilean artist Roberto Matta.

A Guest from Lima: ‘Marriages of Martín de Loyola to Beatriz Ñusta and Juan de Borja to Lorenza Ñusta de Loyola’ at the Museo Nacional del Prado, until 28 April 2019

Marriages of Martín de Loyola to Beatriz Ñusta and Juan de Borja to Lorenza Ñusta de Loyola
Anonymous artist from Cusco
Oil on canvas, 175,2 x 168,3 cm
1718
Lima, Museo Pedro de Osma. Fundación Pedro y Angélica de Osma Gildemeister

The Prado’s ‘Invited Work’ is a large painting on canvas showing the double Marriages of Martin de Loyola to Beatriz Ñusta and Juan de Borja to Lorenza Ñusta de Loyola painted in 1718 by an anonymous artist from Cusco. On loan from the Museo Pedro de Osma in Lima, it will be on display in Madrid until 28 April 2019. The scene depicted brings together two weddings that actually occurred at different times and places with the purpose of showing the blood ties between the Inca dynasty and descendants of two of the founders of the Society of Jesus, Saint Ignatius Loyola and Saint Francis Borja. The symbolic aim being to represent the conquest of southern America as a harmonious union between Spanish vanquishers and the vanquished. 

Click here for more information about this display.

Featured Exhibition: Displaying Latin America, Harvard Art Museums, until 12 May 2019

Standardized Housing, Buenos Aires, 1931-1932: Building types A, B, C: isometrics

This exhibition explores the vibrant cosmopolitan architecture culture in Latin America during the interwar period, using original materials from archival collections at Harvard. Presented here are works by Argentinian architects Jorge Ferrari Hardoy and Juan Kurchan, who collaborated with Le Corbusier, and by German architect Franz Möller, who worked with Walter Gropius, both of whom were key propagandists of modern architecture. In 1931, Möller opened the office Gropius-Moller Arquitectos in Buenos Aires. Among the firm’s projects was the Ciudad Balnearia de Chapadmalal, a private commission for a large-scale seaside resort, represented here by the clubhouse. This high-end leisure development contrasts with Gropius Standard—a one-story, low-cost house intended for young professional couples that could transform over time to meet the needs of a growing family. This system continued Gropius’s interests in prefabrication, which can be traced back to his Bauhaus years, but was adjusted to suit local building and climatic conditions.

In the early 1940s, Ferrari Hardoy and Kurchan conceived of an apartment building on Virrey del Pino Street to showcase the possibilities of “city in the park” modern planning; they envisioned the project as a fragment of a future greater whole. The 10-story apartment block is set back on an urban lot, and an ample garden separates the building from the street. Three august carefully preserved eucalyptus trees were woven into the facade, fusing practical climatic considerations and formal aesthetic concerns. Both architects were engaged in the Plan Director, a master plan for the Argentinian capital that had been developed with Le Corbusier in Paris. Le Corbusier’s daring proposal for skyscrapers on the Rio de la Plata, which had sprung from his 1929 visit to Argentina, would have extended the city of the Pampas into the river. This key functional and symbolic node sets the development of the Plan Director into a multinode city linked by circulation arteries. After the war, working for the city government, Ferrari Hardoy and Kurchan refined the plan and vigorously endeavored to publicize and implement it.

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New Web Resource: Latin American and Caribbean Contemporary Art Web Archive

Carlos Cruz-Diez, Un être flottant, 2016
© Courtesy Galerie Mitterrand / Benoit Fougeirol

The Latin American and Caribbean Contemporary Art Web Archive is a collection developed by the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation‘s Art & Architecture Librarians, and is an extension of an existing effort focused on collecting publications in all formats that document contemporary art and artists of Latin America and the Caribbean. The agreement defines contemporary art as it refers to ‘developments in the visual arts from 1975 to the present,’ with material sought ‘for the entire career of artists who have been active at any time since 1975.’

This archive aims to preserve for researchers the personal and official websites belonging to notable contemporary Latin American and Caribbean artists in order to assure the continuing availability of the important content they contain.

Click here to access and browse the collection on Archive-It here

Featured Exhibition: ‘Southern Geometries, from Mexico to Patagonia’, Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris, until February 24, 2019

CartierThe exhibition Southern Geometries, from Mexico to Patagonia celebrates the wealth of color and diversity of styles in the geometric art of Latin America, bringing together 250 artworks made by over 70 artists from the Pre-Columbian period to present. Including modernist abstract art, sculpture and architecture as well as ceramics, weaving, and body painting, the exhibition explores the wide range of approaches to geometric abstraction in Latin America, whether influenced by Pre-Columbian art, the European avant-garde or Amerindian cultures. Southern Geometries weaves visual relationships among diverse cultures and regions across time, inviting visitors to discover the vibrant patterns and designs of Latin American art.

Click here to find out more.

International Study Day: Iberian Polychromed Sculpture, Musée L (Université Catholique de Louvain), Louvain, December 7, 2018

The Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA) in Brussels, in collaboration with the Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), organises  the first conference in Belgium devoted to Iberian polychromed sculpture and its relation to other Europeans regions. Referring to UCL’s Spanish sculpture collections, this conference brings together scholars specialised in the sculpture from Spain, Belgium, Italy and Mexico. The speakers will trace the sculptures from their production, their technics, their links and reception in other European regions.

1. Lectures (Auditoire du Musée L)

09:15-09:50 –  Welcome

09:50-10:00  – Introduction remarks – Eduardo Lamas-Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels)

The polychrome Sculpture in Spain and Latin America (chairwoman, Abigail Newman, Universiteit Antwerpen)

10:00-10:20 – Manuel García Luque (Universidad de Granada), El escultor Pedro de Mena y el naturalismo matérico

10:20-10:40 – Pablo Amador (Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional de México), Aspectos técnicos de la escultura policromada hispánica

10:40-11:00 – Géraldine Patigny (Université Libre de Bruxelles – Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), La sculpture polychromée espagnole dans les collections belges

11:00-11:15 – Questions and debate

11:15-11:30 – Coffee break

The Spanish polychrome Sculpture and Europe (chairman, Ralph Dekoninck, Université Catholique de Louvain)

11:30-11:50 – Roberto Alonso Moral (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), La migración de escultura entre Nápoles y España durante el siglo XVII y su impacto: algunos problemas de identificación

11:50-12:10 – Wendy Frère (Université Libre de Bruxelles), La polychromie dans la sculpture baroque des anciens Pays-Bas méridionaux et la Principauté de Liège

12:10-12:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum, London), Passion and Prejudice: Attitudes towards Spanish Sculpture in Britain in the Nineteenth Century

12:30-12:40 – Questions and debate

12:45-13:45 – Lunch

2. Study session: the Spanish Medieval and Early Renaissance Sculptures from Val-Duchesse (chairwoman, Corinne Van Hauwermeiren, CONSERVART)

14:00-15:00 Emmanuelle Mercier (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Erika Rabello (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Mathieu Somon (Université Catholique de Louvain).

15:00-15:15 – Questions and debate

15:15-15:30 – Concluding remarks

3. Visit to the Museum Collection

Free, booking required. Click here to reserve a place and for more information.