Tag Archives: Latin America

Reminder: ARTES AGM and Group Visit, V&A, London, Thursday 13 June 2019

ARTES’s AGM will take place at the V&A at 12:30 on 13 June 2019. It will be followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th Century.

Meet at the V&A, Exhibition Road Reception, at 11:50. Sandwich lunch (GBP 5) and AGM from 12–2, followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

***Attendees are asked to arrive punctually, as late arrivals may be difficult to  accommodate*** 

Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com to book a place.

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Maius Workshop Meeting: Emily Floyd, ‘The Word as Object in Colonial South America’, QMUL, 3 June 2018, 4:30pm–5:30pm

The Maius Workshop’s next event will take place at 4:30–5:30 pm on 3 June 2019 at QMUL (Arts Two, room 2.18).

We are delighted to welcome Emily Floyd, Lecturer in Visual Culture and Art before 1700 at UCL, for a conversation on her forthcoming article, ‘The Word as Object in Colonial South America’. A draft of the article will be pre-circulated, and Emily looks forward to the group’s comments and questions.

Please email maiusworkshop@gmail.com to sign up to this free event.

***How to find Arts Two, room 2.18: the Arts Two building is number 35 on the campus map at this link. The campus is best accessed through the East Gate entrance. Please note that the Arts Two building does not have an entrance on Mile End Road.

ARTES AGM and Group Visit, V&A, London, Thursday 13 June 2019

ARTES’s AGM will take place at the V&A at 12:30 on 13 June 2019. It will be followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th Century.

Meet at the V&A, Exhibition Road Reception, at 11:50. Sandwich lunch (GBP 5) and AGM from 12–2, followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

***Attendees are asked to arrive punctually, as late arrivals may be difficult to  accommodate*** 

Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com to book a place.

New rules to protect Machu Picchu World Heritage Site

The Peruvian government announced on Friday 10 May a two-week restriction to three important areas at Machu Picchu to prevent greater degradation to the iconic Inca citadel, whose name means “old mountain” in the Quechua language indigenous to the area. The mountain-top citadel lies around 100 kilometres (60 miles) from the Andean city of Cusco, the old Inca capital in south-eastern Peru, and was built during the reign of the Inca emperor Pachacuti (1438-1471). It was rediscovered in 1911 by the American explorer Hiram Bingham and declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1983.

From May 15 to 28 2019, access to the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of the Condor and the Intihuatana Stone will be strictly controlled, the Peruvian government said. “These measures are necessary to conserve Machu Picchu, given the evidence of deterioration” on stone surfaces caused by visitors to the three areas, the culture ministry said. Almost 6,000 visitors a day are permitted onto the 15th-century site in two waves. The new plan will give tourists just three hours to visit the three emblematic areas. The authorities will evaluate the impact of the measures before applying new permanent rules from June 1.

Click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: The Avant-garde Networks of Amauta: Argentina, Mexico, and Peru in the 1920s, Museo Nacional Reina Sofía, Madrid, until 27 May 2019

José Sabogal, Cover of the journal Amauta, n. 26 (September – October), 1929, Journal, Museo de Arte de Lima

Founded and directed by José Carlos Mariátegui, the Peruvian magazine Amauta was one of the most influential cultural and political periodicals of the early 20th century. The exhibition of more than 250 works follows Amauta’s development as a platform to explore the diversity of the avant-garde artistic production in Peru, Argentina, and Mexico and the debates that shaped the art of Latin America during the 1920s. This exhibition, organised by Beverly Adams, Curator of Latin American Art, Blanton Museum of Art, and Natalia Majluf, Director and Chief Curator, Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru addresses the avant-garde production of a vast network of artists and writers connected with Amauta. and includes works in a variety of forms ranging from paintings, drawings, sculptures and photographs through to popular ceramics, many by lesser known artists as well as pieces by Tina Modotti and Diego Rivera. A large network of correspondents in Latin America and Europe fed the magazine, which had a print run of 3-4,000, and gave Amauta an international impact.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

The exhibition will travel from Madrid to the Museo de Arte de Lima (20 June – 22 September 2019); the Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City (17 October 2019 – 12 January 2020); and finally to Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin, Texas (February 16, 2020 – 17 May, 2020).

News: ‘Dallas Museum of Art boosts Latin American focus with new curator and acquisitions’

A carpet fragment with double-headed bird, probably made in Peru in the 17th century. Gifted to the DMA from the de Unger family

As reported by The Art Newspaper, the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) is looking to enlarge its Latin American art collection. The museum has created a new endowed curatorial post, the Jorge Baldor Curator of Latin American Art, currently open for applications. It has also made significant new acquisitions of art from the region, from a 17th-century Peruvian carpet to artworks by Mexican artists Miguel Covarrubias, José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera, and Chilean artist Roberto Matta.