Tag Archives: Latin America

New book: The Casa del Deán: New World Imagery in a Sixteenth-Century Mexican Mural Cycle

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The Casa del Deán: New World Imagery in a Sixteenth-Century Mexican Mural Cycle, by Penny C. Morrill
(Austin: University of Texas Press, December 2014)
ISBN: 978-0-292-75930-5 (Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Series in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture)
“Extensively illustrated with new color photographs, this pioneering study of a masterpiece of colonial Latin American art reveals how a cathedral dean and native American painters drew on their respective visual traditions to promote Christian faith in the New World.”

CFP: Revising the Hispanic Canon. Visibility and Cultural Capital at the Margins

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CFP: Revising the Hispanic Canon. Visibility and Cultural Capital at the Margins

Deadline: 13 May 2015

In recent years, meta-critical studies such as Ideologies of Hispanism (2005), Spain Beyond Spain (2005), Reading Iberia (2007), Un hispanismo para el siglo XXI (2011) and Iberian Modalities (2013) have sought to uncover the ideological discourses underlying Hispanic Studies and trace its historical evolution in order to elucidate how the discipline might or ought to evolve, if it is to remain relevant in a context in which national, linguistic and disciplinary boundaries have become problematized. The present volume, co-edited by Stuart Davis and Maite Usoz de la Fuente, seeks to contribute to this ongoing debate by considering how the work of PhD students and early career researchers in Hispanic Studies reflects and contributes to the expansion and the blurring of disciplinary limits.
In a broad sense, the duty of every new generation of scholars in any arts and humanities discipline is to encourage a revision of the canon within that discipline and, in the process, to contribute to a redefinition of the discipline itself. This is an exciting enterprise, but it is not without its challenges and pitfalls. Amongst them is the question of how to attain visibility when working on a topic that is little known, or considered a niche area within one’s discipline, or how to position one’s work if undertaking inter- or multidisciplinary research that surpasses disciplinary boundaries. The aim of this book is to offer a useful overview of new research in Hispanic Studies by a selection of emerging scholars, and to reflect upon questions of canonicity, visibility and cultural capital, and the ways in which such notions span and contribute to shape our field of study.
Contributions to this volume are welcome from doctoral students and early career researchers (understood as those who have obtained their doctoral degree within the past seven years) whose work focuses on (but may not be limited to) the following areas:

  • Hispanism beyond Spain and Latin America: North Africa, the Philippines, and Guinea
  • Interdisciplinary crossroads: comparative and multidisciplinary approaches to Hispanic texts
  • The role of visual and popular culture within Hispanic Studies
  • Other languages and cultures (non-Castilian languages and cultures of Spain and Latin America)
  • Going against the grain: Paradigm-shifting revisions of the canon
  • New methodological approaches to canonical texts

If you want to contribute to this volume, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to hispanic.canon@gmail.com by 13 May 2015, accompanied by a short biography including your name, institutional affiliation and areas of research (2-3 lines). Selected contributors will be contacted by 30 May 2015 and the deadline for submission of essays will be 31 December 2015.

Glitterati: Portraits & Jewelry from Colonial Latin America, Denver

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Glitterati: Portraits & Jewelry from Colonial Latin America. Exhibition, Denver Art Museum, 7 December 2014 – 27 February 2016.
During the Spanish Colonial period in Latin America (1521–1850), precious gold and silver were crafted into elegant jewelry then embellished with emeralds from Colombia, coral from Mexico, and pearls from Venezuela. Displaying their wealth and status, people were painted wearing their finest dress and elaborate jewelry.

 

1st ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholars announced

ARTES is delighted to announce the winners of the 2014 ARTES Coll & Cortés scholarships. Out of a very strong field the following awards were made:

Santa CatalinaARTES Coll & Cortés PhD Scholarship for students at a UK University

This was awarded to Kathryn Santner, a PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, to support her study of the paintings in the Convent of Santa Catalina de Sena, in Arequipa, Peru.

 

ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholarships for PhD or post-doc students in Spain, Portugal or Latin America

This was awarded to Ana Hernández Ferreirós, a doctoral student at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, for her research on the twelfth-century bibles of San Isidoro de Leon and San Millan de la Cogolla.

ARTES Coll & Cortés Travel Scholarships

These were awarded to Costanza Beltrami, a 3rd-year undergraduate student at the Courtauld Institute, for a research trip to Spain to visit buildings associated with the fifteenth-century architect Juan Guas. Another scholarship was awarded to Matilde Grimaldi, a PhD student at the Courtauld Institute, for a research trip to Tortosa to study the city’s twelfth-century cathedral (now largely destroyed), and its treasury.

ARTES extends its warmest congratulations to the 2014 scholars, and thanks Coll & Cortés once again for their generous support.

 

 

Internships at Coll & Cortés, dealers in fine arts

headers01Coll & Cortés Fine Arts, dealers in Hispanic, Latin American and Italian art, are offering internship opportunities at their London offices.  These internships are unpaid, but interns will have opportunities to gain valuable experience with major London dealers, with picture research likely to be a significant part of the role.

Internships will be offered on a competitive basis. Applicants are expected to hold a degree in Art History (or be in their final year of a BA) and will need at least a reading knowledge of Spanish.  Internships are offered throughout the year (except July and August), for a minimum of 4 consecutive weeks. Coll and Cortés regrets that it cannot assist in funding transport or accommodation costs for interns.

Applications should be sent to CollCortesinternships@gmail.com by 2nd April 2015. Applicants should not expect notice of receipt; successful candidates will normally be notified by the end of May. Applications should include the following:

1) a covering letter (max 2 pages), including a description of suitability and dates of availability over the next 12 months; and a CV (max 2 pages), emphasising educational or professional experience of particular relevance. These should be sent in a single MS Word document. Applicants are strongly encouraged to research on the Coll and Cortés website in order to tailor their application, paying particular attention to Coll and Cortés’ highly respected catalogues.

2) An academic or professional reference, sent directly to CollCortesinternships@gmail.com by the referee.

Please note that ARTES assists only in recruiting candidates for these internships and accepts no legal responsibility to any applicant or third party arising from this notice, or the award or otherwise of a internship. Coll & Cortés and ARTES reserve the right to make no awards in cases where they deem that applications are not of satisfactory quality. Coll & Cortés and ARTES will not enter into correspondence with unsuccessful applicants or their academic advisors regarding its decisions.collcortes_logo

 

Last chance to see ‘America Latina: Photographs 1960-2013’

American Latinia‘America Latina: Photographs 1960-2013’ at the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, Paris, closes on 6 April 2014 before moving to the Museo Amparo, Puebla, Mexico (14 June – 29 September 2014). This exhibition, co-produced with the Museo Amparo in Puebla Mexico, brings together works by 70 artists from eleven countries, ranging from documentary photographers to contemporary artists who manipulate/modify the photographic image.

Call for Papers: ‘Representations of Violence and Ethics in Ibero-American Cultures’

Conference to be held on Friday 9th May 2014 at the University of Manchester.
For further information please see: http://conferencerveiac.wordpress.com/
We invite colleagues to send an abstract (max. 300 words) for a twenty-minute paper, along with a brief biographical note, by Moday 31st March 2014 to conference.rveiac@gmail.com.
Convenors: Ignacio Aguiló (ignacio.aguilo@manchester.ac.uk) and Miquel Pomar-Amer (miquel.pomar-amer@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk)
This conference is generously supported by Language-Based Area Studies, School of Arts, Languages and Cultures (University of Manchester).
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This international conference aims to examine the way in which literature and the arts have represented violence in Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula since the 1960s, with a particular interest in the ethical aspects that such a representation entails. Our aim is to analyse how ethics and aesthetics interact in the portrayal of traumatic events. How can artistic representations contribute to processes of mourning? Does art contribute to the perpetuation and trivialisation of violence? Where are the limits of the morally acceptable? What is the role of artistic representations in the face of atrocity?
All of these questions are particularly relevant considering that 2014 marks the commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the Atocha bombings in Madrid and the twentieth anniversary of the attack on the AMIA bombing that targeted the Jewish community in Buenos Aires.
Proposals are invited for papers which explore some of these suggested topics – although they are not exclusive:
– Mourning and post-traumatic reactions
– Monuments and commemorations
– Modes of representation: the abject, the mythical, the allegorical, the grotesque, the spectacular
– Racial and religious-based violence
– Gender violence
– Violence and parody/irony
– Violence and reception studies
– Violence and consent
– Forgetting/forgiving
– ‘Unethical’ representations: challenges to the ethical constraints