Tag Archives: Latin America

Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship, Society of Architectural Historians, deadline 30 September, 2018

 

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Cathedral of Santa María la Menor, Santo Domingo

This award provides support for travel related to research on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture.

The awards consist of a $2,000 stipend for a junior scholar and a $6,000 award for a senior scholar. The awardees will be notified in December and will be recognized at the SAH 72nd Annual International Conference in Providence, Rhode Island (April 24–28, 2019). The awards will be announced in the May 2019 issue of the SAH Newsletter.

This fellowship is intended to support the research of junior scholars (usually scholars engaged in doctoral dissertation research) annually, and senior scholars (scholars who have completed their PhD or equivalent terminal degree) every other year in even-numbered years (2020, 2022, 2024, etc.). The research to be supported must focus on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture, including colonial architecture produced by the Spaniards in the Philippines and what is today the United States. The applicant must be a current member of SAH.

Following completion of travel and research supported by the fellowship, each de Montêquin Fellowship awardee must submit a written report summarizing their research and explaining what travel was undertaken and how funds were spent. The report will be submitted to the SAH office no later than three months following the completion of work related to the fellowship. Awardees are required to upload images to SAHARA (a minimum of 50  for junior scholars and a minimum of 150 for senior scholars).

You will need two recommendations to apply for this fellowship, a description of the research project on Iberian or Ibero-American architecture to be funded (500 words maximum), a current curriculum vitae (5 pages max), and a statement of purpose.

Applications for the 2019 Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship will open at 3 pm CDT on August 1, 2018, and close on September 30, 2018.

Click here for more information and to complete the application form.

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Job: Assistant Professor (Research): Pemberton Fellowship for the Study of Spanish Art, Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, University of Durham, UK

NNP-DURHAM_CONGREGATION_48This post is full-time and fixed term (1 September 2018 – 31 August 2019).

The Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art seeks to appoint an outstanding candidate to a one-year fixed-term Research Fellowship in Spanish and/or Neapolitan Art of the early modern period (1550-1750). This posts offer an exciting opportunity to make a major contribution to the development of research at the Zurbarán Centre in relation to Durham Castle (University College) at Durham University. The successful candidates will be expected to undertake internationally excellent research. There will also be the opportunity to contribute to teaching in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, with which the candidate will be administratively associated, to a maximum of 6 hours per week. The appointment is tenable from 1 September 2018 or as soon as possible thereafter.

We welcome applications from exceptional scholars with research interests Spanish art of the Golden Age and/or Italian art of the Classical and Baroque period, with a particular focus on major artistic centres such as Rome and Naples; in addition to painting, sculpture and architecture, we welcome applications centred also on decorative arts and garden history. The Pemberton Fellow will be associated with University College, located in Durham Castle, which houses a remarkable artistic collection which includes Spanish and Italian 17th-century art. The candidate will enjoy full board at Durham Castle (including meals and accommodation, subject to income tax and National Insurance deductions) as well as a contribution towards research related expenses.

Click here for more information

Workshop: Transatlantic Spain: the Afro-Hispanic Experience of Slavery and Freedom (15th–19th centuries), Birkbeck, University of London, 6 July 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f463781942f1063291068392f12foriginalThis international workshop aims to contribute to the visibilization of enslaved and free peoples of Afro-Hispanic descent, by exploring their representation in the visual and literary regimes of early modern Spain and the New World, and to generate critical insights into the articulation of slave subjectivities.

This gathering, supported by CILAVS, the Centre of Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies at Birkbeck, University of London is organised by the Transatlantic Afro-Hispanic Study Group, that emerged from the international conference Border Subjects/ Global Hispanisms (Birkbeck, November 2017). The latter was the outcome of the institutional collaboration between the Department of Cultures and Languages at Birkbeck and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. This collaboration has already produced our first publication entitled, Post/Colonialism and the Pursuit of Freedom in the Black Atlantic (Routledge, 2018, ed. J. Branche), the result of an international conference held at the University of Pittsburgh in 2015.

To attend the workshop, please register here.

PROGRAMME

14:30pm-16:00

Jerome Branche (University of Pittsburgh, USA), Love and Affec(ta)tion: Re/Viewing Francisco de Quevedo’s ‘Boda de negros

Francisco de Quevedo’s ‘Boda de negros,’ (in)famous for its conceptista artistry as much as for its anti-immigrant and anti-black virulence, acquires an important historico-existential dimension when considered in the broader context of (Hispano)-Christian religious symbology of the seventeenth century. My paper proposes that the poem’s central trope of marital consummation, the performance of coitus by the black groom, simultaneously speaks to and reveals important additional registers of both sexual and racial dominance. On the one hand, the aromantic and bloody implications of bridal penetration sans affection figure as an early discursive projection of black brutality in Hispanic and western artistic discourse, as also do the poem’s references to cannibalism. On the other, the image of the nail (es/clavo), which he punningly deploys to also identify Tomé, the groom, partakes of the symbology of humiliation, servitude, and death (by crucifixion), that characterize Catholic traditions of mysticism, saintliness and self-negation. My paper proposes that a reflection on the image of the S and the nail deployed here by the poet, ubiquitous in the popular and religious iconography of the time, beyond the symbolism of Christian devotion/abjection, also speaks volumes in relation to the enslaved, incoming Africans, and to the material and epistemic violence visited and potentially visited on their bodies under the aegis of conquest and enslavement.

Baltasar Fra-Molinero (Bates College, Maine, USA), Black Women and the Inquisition: Race, Gender, Healing, and Power

More than two hundred women of African descent were prosecuted by the Inquisition of the Canary Islands between 1505 and 1834. Most cases involved accusations of witchcraft, or its lesser charge, sorcery. The accusations involved healing practices that the religious authorities considered unorthodox. The accusers could be priests as well as lay people who, in some cases, were coerced to testify against these women on the basis of their social reputation as healers outside the legal and professional channels. These women competed against the male practitioners of faculty medicine as well as against curanderosand saludadores, men and women who were authorized to use a mixture of empirical healing knowledge with religious prayers to obtain cures or remedies to the health of individuals or entire groups. This presentation explores the tensions created when Black women in the Canary Islands practiced medicine and magic healing while negotiating their social exclusion due to their gender and race. The reputation some of these Black women gained broke boundaries of religious and social prohibition. The Inquisition moved against many of these Black women on charges both of heresy—use of religious objects and words without authorization—and professional impropriety—practicing medicine without proper faculty—a crime that clearly fell outside the jurisdiction of the Holy Office.

Helen Melling (Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London, U.K.), Contested Visions of Black Wet Nurses in 18th & 19th Century Lima

Portraits of infants alongside their black wet nurses and nannies were incorporated into the family albums of the wealthiest Peruvian and European immigrant families in Lima from the 1860s, coinciding with the immediate post-abolition period in Peru. Although the creole elite’s preference in employing wet nurses of African-descent is examined and contested in late 18th century discourses, their presence in Peruvian visual culture does not arise until the advent of photography, producing the first images to make visible a practice that dates from Peru’s colonial and slaveholding past. The duplicity of these portraits resides in the dissonance between the marginal or supposedly ‘invisible’ presence of the wet nurse, and their centrality in the formation of an elite identity. This tension ruptures the fantasy of masterly ownership and creole ‘whiteness’, with the wet nurse constituting a deeply ambivalent symbol of the socio-racial pedigree of the elite.

16:15-16:30 Break

16.30-18.15

Carmen Fracchia (Birkbeck, University of London, U.K.), The Colour of Freedom in Hapsburg Spain (16th-17th Centuries)

This paper addresses the ways in which visual artists articulate and problematize the hegemonic associations of the appearance of (a) blackness as the social condition of slavery and the appearance of (b) whiteness as the social condition of freedom in the visual form. It will also focus on the hegemonic idea of ‘whiteness’ as the exclusive referent of the concept of humanity and on ‘blackness’ as the referent of Afro-Hispanic counter-culture as articulated in anonymous poems written individually and collectively by enslaved and liberated Afro-Hispanic people in the Spanish black confraternities.

José Miguel López García (University Autónoma of Madrid, Spain), In Pursuit of Freedom: Emancipated, Coartados, and Marrooned in Madrid (1701-1820)

During the Bourbon Dynasty, slaves in Madrid could obtain their freedom through letters of emancipation, deeds of ransom (coartación), or by running away. This paper, based on the analysis of 344 documents from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the early 19th century, considers the different degrees and routes to freedom that slaves could aspire to in a European capital city.

Luis Méndez Rodriguez (University of Seville, Spain), Narratives and Fictions Around Slavery: Towards A New Artistic Imaginary

This work analyzes the elements which defined artistic narratives and which allowed the spread of a visual culture of transatlantic slavery through the Hispanic world from the beginning of the seventeenth century. The Baroque created a set of archetypal images of Afro-Hispanic people, based eitheron their integration into, or their social exclusion from Hispanic societies. In this way, many groups congregated into ethnicbrotherhoods where they found a space to protect themselves from external threats, based on solidarity which allowed their visible participation in the public space. This paper also analyzes a set of images which formed an iconography of slavery. In the artistic context, some slaves not only achieved their freedom but also developed a profession and a certain social recognition. Their presence is studied in the development of a first artistic historiography based on documentary evidence, which also reveals how a fictional discourse of Afro-Hispanic lives was generated in the centuries that followed.

Tomorrow: Artistic Trade between Spain and its Viceroyalties from 1500 to 1800, King’s College, Cambridge, 22 June 2018

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This is the first conference in the United Kingdom devoted to artistic trade between Spain and its viceroyalties. Referring to Cambridge’s Spanish and colonial art collections and with the indispensable support of the Nigel Glendinning studentship for Spanish studies, this conference brings together scholars specialized in the art from the Spanish Viceroyalties. The speakers will trace the artworks from their production, their movement with the help of agents and their collection and display at their destination. Such approach avoids setting an epicentre and periphery but establishes an equalitarian platform on the movement of art within the Spanish Empire.

8:30- 9:15 – Registration.

Introductory remarks:

9:15- 9:30 – Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

Keynote speaker:

9:30- 10:00 – Luisa Elena Alcalá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Passageways of Art in the Atlantic world: Artists, Patrons and Agents.

  1. Workshops and Artists Producing Art for the Spanish Viceroyalties and Transitory Spaces.

Chaired by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

10:00- 10:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum), Shipwrecked Ivories: The Confluence of East and West.

10:30- 11:00 – Piers Baker Bates (The Open University), Traveling between the Viceroyalties: Artistic Translation in the Sixteenth-century Hispanic World.

11:00- 11:30 – Escardiel González Estevez (Universidad de Sevilla), Alonso Vázquez between Seville, Mexico and Manila (1603-1608): The Paradigm of a “Global Artist”.

11:30- 12:00- Questions.

12:00-13:30- Lunch break.

  1. The Role of Agents Commercializing Artworks between Spain and its Viceroyalties

Chaired by José Ramón Marcaida López (University of Saint Andrews)

13:30-14:00 – Sandra Van Ginhoven (Getty Research Institute, Research Associate), Spanish Transatlantic Agents and the Flemish Guilliam Forchondt in the Overseas Paintings Trade.

14:00- 14:30 – Corinna Gramatke (Technical University of Munich Chair of Conservation-Restoration), “The Portable Europe”: European Artworks for the Jesuit Province of Paraguay (1608-1767).

14:30-15:00 – Eduardo Lamas Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Madrilenian Painters and America: Artistic Production for Overseas Trade Networks and their possible Agents.

15:00- 16:00- Questions followed by a coffee break.

  1. Collecting and Display in Private, Civil and Religious Spaces in the Spanish Viceroyalties.

Chaired by Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)

16:00-16:30 – Kathryn Santner (Leverhulme Trust Fellow, ILAS, London), Conventual Art Collections and Artistic Exchange in the Colonial Viceroyalties.

16:30-17:00 – Isabel Oleas Mogollón (University of Delaware), The Divine and the Self: Uses and Meanings of Mirrors in Quito’s Jesuit Church.

17:00-17:30 – Veronika Winkler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München), Witnessing the Saint’s Life: Patrons and Hagiographical Painting Cycles of Viceregal Peru.

17:30- 18:00- Final questions and closing remarks.

For further information please contact Akemi Herráez Vossbrink at alh64@cam.ac.uk.

To book your place, please click here

Opens today: Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up, V&A Museum, London

640Open until 4 November 2018, this exhibition presents an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico. Click here to book tickets and see related events.

 

Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies at Birkbeck, U of London—Deadline 15 June 2018

Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies 18-19

Birkbeck School of Arts will award one fully funded Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarship in Renaissance Studies beginning in 2018-19. 

We invite outstanding applicants working in one or more than one of the constituent disciplines of Renaissance Studies (ca. 1400-1670) in the School of Arts at Birkbeck. Applications are welcomed within the fields of History of Art; English Literature; Drama and Theatre Studies; Intellectual History; Early Modern French Studies; Iberian and Latin American Studies and Visual Culture. The scholarship is equally open to candidates wishing to work in interdisciplinary ways and to those located within one of the single disciplines.

Supervision in Renaissance Studies in the School of Arts is wide in scope. For a list of Renaissance Studies specialists, who can act as supervisors, please visit the academic staff pages on the School’s departmental websites.

Eligibility

Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarships are open to Home/EU and International applicants applying for a full-time or part time M.Phil/PhD place within the School of Arts, starting in the 2018/19 academic year.

Funding

The Birkbeck Postgraduate Research Scholarship awards will include a full fee waiver capped at the value of the full-time Home/EU rate for M.Phil/PhD degrees (currently £4,260), in addition to an annual stipend set at Research Council rates (currently £16,777; pro rata in the case of a part-time award).

Duration of Awards

Scholarships will be tenable for up to three years (subject to satisfactory academic progress) for full-time students, and at an appropriate pro rata rate and extended duration for part-time students.

How to Apply – Application Process

To apply for an award please download the funding application form here.

Please note that you will also need to apply for a place on a relevant PhD programme:

M.Phil/PhD Comparative Literature

M.Phil/PhD English and Humanities

M.Phil/PhD French

M.Phil/PhD German

M.Phil/PhD History of Art

M.Phil/PhD Iberian and Latin American Studies

Please consult the general guidance on applying online for an M.Phil/PhD place. You can find the School of Arts Guide for Applicants here. All prospective students are strongly advised to first make informal contact with a potential supervisor. For information about staff and the research environment at Birkbeck, please consult the School’s Departmental webpages.

Application Deadline: 6pm 15 June 2018.

Please be advised that all applicants wishing to be considered for funding may be required to attend an interview to discuss their proposal. Interviews will be held in w/c 18 and 25 June (if not before). Results will be announced in early July 2018.

The completed form should be emailed to SoAFA@bbk.ac.uk.

If you have any enquiries about this studentship and the scope of supervision within the School of Arts, please contact Dr Luisa Calè, Assistant Dean for Postgraduate Research (l.cale@bbk.ac.uk).

Workshop: Nuevos caminos del hispanismo, 16–17 October 2018, Casa de Velázquez, Madrid

ehehi-bis-500x191Click here for more information on a three-day residential workshop at the Casa Velázquez in Madrid. Intended for young researchers, the workshop will explore new currents in Hispanic studies. It is organised around a series of lectures by the following scholars:

Carlos MARTÍNEZ SHAW (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid / Real Academia de la Historia).
Alicia ALTED VIGIL (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid)
Louise BÉNAT-TACHOT (Université Paris – Sorbonne)
Fernando BOUZA ÁLVAREZ (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Serge GRUZINSKI (École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris)
Roberto MONDOLA (Università degli Studi l’Orientale di Napoli)
José Luis SÁNCHEZ NORIEGA (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Jesusa VEGA GONZÁLEZ (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

followed by extensive discussion in Spanish and French.

The deadline for enrolment is 12 July 2018 at 5pm. Applicants are required to fill an application form, which will be evaluated on the basis of academic record and language fluency. The 20 selected candidates will be notified after 20 July 2018. The workshop costs 50 euros inclusive of accommodation and lunch. African and Latin American applicants may be selected for a scholarship of 300 euros, intended as a contribution towards travel costs.