Category Archives: Latin America

Lecture: Barbaro Martinez-Ruiz, The Impossible Reflection: A New Approach to African Themes in Wifredo Lam’s Art (Cuba, 1902-1982), Oxford, 8 February 2018

Wifredo Lam, The Jungle, 1943, MOMA, New York

Thursday 08 February 2018, 5 pm, University of Oxford, Latin American Centre Seminar Room, 1 Church Walk, Oxford

Bárbaro Martínez-Ruiz (B.A the University of Havana, Ph.D. Yale University, 2004), is an Art Historian with expertise in African and Caribbean artistic, visual and religious practices, whose work challenges traditional disciplinary boundaries and examines the varied understandings of – and engagement with – ‘art’ and ‘visual culture’. Following professorships at Havana’s High Institute of Art from 1993-1997, the Rhode Island School of Design from 2002-2004 and Stanford University from 2004-2013, Martinez-Ruiz joined the University of Cape Town, where he has served as the head of the Art History and Discourse of Art Department since 2013. He is the 2017-2018 recipient of the Leverhulme Visiting Professorship, hosted by Oxford’s School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, and a Senior Fellow at St Antony’s College. His books include Kongo Graphic Writing and Other Narratives of the Sign, Temple University Press, 2013 (English) and El Colegio de México, 2012 (Spanish); Faisal Abdu’Allah: On the Art of Dislocation, Atlantic Center of Modern Art Press, 2012 and Art and Emancipation in Jamaica: Isaac Mendes Belisario and his Worlds, Yale University Press, 2007, for which he received the College Art Association Alfred H. Barr Award. Other recent publications include Ma kisi Nsi: L’art de habitants de region de Mbanza Kongo, in Angola figures de pouvoir. (Paris: Dapper Museum Press, 2010); Writing Bodies in the Bakongo Atlantic Experience, in Performances: Challenges for Art and Anthropology. (Quai Branly Museum Press, 2010); Funerary Pots of the Kongo in Central Africa, in African Terra Cotta: A Millenary Heritage. (Geneva: Musee Barbier Mueller Press, 2008), The Impossible Reflection: A New Approach to African Themes in Wifredo Lam’s Art, in Wifredo Lam. (Miami: Perez Art Museum Press, 2008). In addition to his research and teaching, Martinez-Ruiz is an active curator, whose shows have explored issues of visual communication, dislocation and hybridity in the work of contemporary artists across the African diaspora. He also serves as an editor for the Cuban Studies Magazine and Harvard’s Transition Magazine and was a researcher for Pacific Standard Time AL at the Getty Foundation and the Museum of Latin American Art, Los Angeles California from 2014-16.

Convened by Eduardo Posada-Carbo

Advertisements

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 2018)

01_diego_rivera_mural_01

Diego Rivera, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, 1931, SFAI, San Francisco

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 18)

Deadline: 7 August 2017

The Art History of Latin America has been written, for the most part,  in the 20th and 21st century.  As a discipline it is the product of two distinct points of view: the individual countries’ national art histories and visions generated from other regions, which privilege supra-national conceptions of geography and identity. Be they the Hispanic art histories of the 1930s, the North American passion for Mexican muralism of the 1930s, the European interests in alternative forms of Baroque in the post Second World War period, or the high modernist interpretations of modern art in Latin America during the post-War period, the discipline of art history has been shaped by scholarship generated outside the region, as much as from the scholarship generated within it. In this panel we invite scholars to study the effects of a globalized perspective on Latin American Art History, specifically by analyzing the contributions of other regions to the understanding of the concept of Latin American art.  We welcome papers studying any of the topics above, as well as the recent histories that stress critical notions such as race, gender and class to create new readings of Latin American Art History.

To submit a paper proposal, please send a 100-200 word abstract and a c.v. to Michele Greet (mgreet@gmu.edu) and Mercedes Trelles (MERCEDESTRELLES@AOL.COM) by August 7, 2017. Submissions for session proposals are due to LASA by Sept. 7. We will inform you of your acceptance prior to that date so that papers that cannot be included in the panel may be submitted individually.

CFP: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present

1923933798International Conference: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal, 27 and 28 November 2017
Deadline for paper proposals: 15 July

The project “Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations
and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present” emerges from the
collaboration of three research groups engaged in the development of
transnational perspectives in contemporary art history and curating and
in the study of relations between artistic production and migratory
processes – with a particular focus on Latin America and Southern
Europe. More specifically, the organization of this project involves:
the group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art” associated
to the research line Contemporary Art Studies at IHA/FCSH-UNL, the
group “Art in a Global Perspective” at CIEBA / FBAUL and the research
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P),
at the University of Barcelona.

Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic
transits from the 1960s to the present – inscribed in the program of
Lisbon 2017 Ibero-American Capital of Culture – aims at opening a
critical space of debate by engaging art historians, curators and
artists of different generations and nationalities to discuss the role
of different forms of dislocation – such as artistic migrations,
exiles, networking, circulations of ideas and theoretical
articulations, artworks and exhibitions – in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America. In this sense, the very
diverse and heterogeneous set of geographical and cultural areas
incorporated by the term “Latin America” are envisioned here as
specific and at the same time as territories strongly connected with
other locations through a complex network of itineraries, circulations,
appropriations and translations. In this network, different historical,
political and economic processes – among them, colonization and
decolonization – play significant roles. This project seeks to explore
the tensions and interrelations between local inscription and
connectivity, habitation and circulation, present enunciation and
revisiting the past.

Two different actions articulate the project Through, From, To Latin
America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to
the present: an international conference and a set of workshops in the
field of curating, artistic practice and art history. In fact, it aims
to offer different possibilities and forms of engagement to the
participants.

Call for papers
The group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art”
(Contemporary Art Studies – IHA/FCSH-UNL), the group “Arte numa
perspectiva global/Art in a global perspective” (CIEBA/FBAUL) and the
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P)
(University of Barcelona), together with the Program of Lisbon 2017
Ibero-American Capital of Culture, welcome communication proposals from
art historians, curators, art critics and artists for the international
conference Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and
artistic transits from the 1960s to the present (Lisbon, Auditorium of
Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa,
27 and 28 November 2017).
Proposals for communications can address, but are not limited to, the
following topics:
– The role of different forms of dislocation in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America;
– Interrelations between local inscription and connectivity, habitation
and circulation, present enunciation and revisiting the past;
– Analysis of artistic and curatorial projects that relate to the
questions proposed;
– Exploration of South-South transits and circulations between Latin
America, Southern Europe, Africa and Asia;
– Interconnections between artistic networks and social and political
movements since the Cold War;
– Analysis of how artistic and cultural networks interfered with (or
participated in) the geopolitics of Cold War and globalization.

Submissions
This two-days conference invites proposals of up to 400 words for
communications of 20 minutes. Please also include a brief biographical
note (150 words), institutional affiliation (or independent) and your
contact information. All documents sent should be in word or pdf format.
We can only accept one proposal for each applicant.

Proposals should be emailed by the 15th of July 2017 to the following
e-mail address:
americalatinaconferencia2017@gmail.com
The languages of the conference are Spanish, Portuguese and English.

Applicants will be notified of the results of the selection by late
July / early August 2017.

An edited volume with selected papers presented at the conference will
be proposed for publication.

For more in formation please check the website:
http://americalatinaconferenciainternacional2017.weebly.com

Closing soon: México 1900–1950 (Dallas)

 

México 1900–1950
Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde

Dallas Museum of Art

12 March  – 16 July, 2017

Major exhibition exploring 50 years of Mexican modern art. Following its showing at the Grand Palais, Paris, this is the exhibition’s only US venue. The result of a combined cultural endeavour between Mexico and France, the exhibition features circa 200 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings and films documenting Mexico’s artistic Renaissance during the first half of the 20th century. Works by the titans of Mexican Modernism are shown alongside those by lesser-known pioneers, including a number of rarely seen works by female artists. Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, Ángel Zárraga, Tina Modotti, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, among others, are on display.

Leonora Carrington at Edge Hill University (Ormskirk)

 

LEONORA CARRINGTON CENTENARY SYMPOSIUM

30 JUNE 2017
EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY (Ormskirk)

Considered a ‘national treasure’ in her adopted country of Mexico, Leonora, whose background was strongly Irish, was originally from Clayton Le Woods, Chorley, Lancashire. Symposium speakers, artists, film makers, writers, curators and academics at the symposium will celebrate her in her home setting.

Guest Speaker, Joanna Moorhead, cousin of Leonora, will discuss her new book, ‘The Surreal Life of Leonora Carrington’ (Little, Brown, 2017).

The Symposium Programme is available to download. (Schedule is subject to change).

Opening soon: Hispanic Society of America at the Prado

2017-hsa-logo-01

Visions of the Hispanic World
Treasures from the Hispanic Society Museum and Library

Museo del Prado
Madrid, 4/4/2017 – 9/10/2017

The exhibition will present around 200 works from the holdings of the Hispanic Society of America in New York. Founded in 1904 by Archer Milton Huntington (1870-1955), a passionate collector and Hispanic art enthusiast, the Hispanic Society houses the most important collections of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American art to be found outside the Iberian Peninsula.

The selection of works in the exhibition includes some of the most celebrated objects from the Hispanic Society’s collections, including archaeological items, Islamic art and Spanish medieval art, works from the Spanish Golden Age, examples of Latin American colonial period and 19th-century art, and Spanish paintings from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Artefacto Visual: Revista de Estudios Latinoamericanos

2017-01-artefactosvisualesNew online journal: Artefacto Visual: Revista de Estudios Latinoamericanos

El primer número de la revista electrónica Artefacto Visual: Revista de estudios visuales latinoamericanos, con un dossier temático sobre “Violencia, conflicto y postconflicto: imágenes de América Latina“.

Contenido:
Presentación, pp. 4-6
Dossier: “Violencia, conflicto y postconflicto: imágenes de América Latina”
Notas para una constelación teórica en torno a la violencia y su representación, por Elena Rosauro, editora invitada, pp. 8-30
Hacer ver: representaciones de la guerra en Colombia, por Alejandro Gamboa Medina, pp. 31-46
1987: Visualidades punk y miradas racializadas en Perú, por Olga Rodríguez-Ulloa, pp. 47-67
Intervenciones sobre la violencia en México: prácticas instituyentes y poderes instituidos, por Ana Torres Arroyo, pp. 68-87
Tribuna Abierta
Multiple paths and multiple traumas: the Inhotim Cultural Institute and its technologies of affect, por Alice Hereen, pp. 89-107
Publicaciones de artista como forma de resistencia política y cultural: los papeles del CAyC (1968-1977), por Daniela Hermosilla Zúñiga, pp.108-126
Mover montañas o impugnarlas. Alegorías de la Modernidad en Cuando la fe mueve montañas, de Francis Alÿs, y Fitzcarraldo, de Werner Herzog, por Miguel Errazu, pp. 127-147
Rodrigo Moya en Guatemala. El registro fotográfico de un ajusticiamiento guerrillero, por Mónica Morales Flores, pp. 148-167
La Entrevista
Stephen Ferry: por una fotografía que debe volver adentro, por Claudia Gordillo, pp. 169-180
Reseñas
La prolongación de la memoria: Doris Salcedo en el Guggenheim de Nueva York, por Juanita Solano, pp. 182-187
Sumando ausencias: miradas y experiencias contradictorias, por Laura Ramírez Palacio, pp. 188-190
Lo visto y lo leído
El sujeto de la fotografía, por María Alzira Brum, p. 192
Política editorial e instrucciones para autores, pp. 194-200