Tag Archives: Iberia

ARTES AGM and Group Visit, V&A, London, Thursday 13 June 2019

ARTES’s AGM will take place at the V&A at 12:30 on 13 June 2019. It will be followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th Century.

Meet at the V&A, Exhibition Road Reception, at 11:50. Sandwich lunch (GBP 5) and AGM from 12–2, followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

***Attendees are asked to arrive punctually, as late arrivals may be difficult to  accommodate*** 

Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com to book a place.

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CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019, deadline 31 March!

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The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.

CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019 

CANONS AND REPERTOIRES: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019 

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.

Conference: Gotik global – kolonial – postkolonial, Dresden, October 26–7, 2018

prac3a7a_da_se_03Gotik global – kolonial – postkolonial: Gotisierende Sakralarchitektur auf der Iberischen Halbinsel und in Lateinamerika vom 19. bis zum 21. Jahrhundert

Dresden, Technische Universität, Institut für Kunst und Musikwissenschaft, Raum ABS/E08/H, 26. – 27.10.2018
Tagung der Technischen Universität Dresden, Institut für Kunst- und Musikwissenschaft der Philosophischen Fakultät in Zusammenarbeit mit der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V.

Immer wieder werden im iberischen und iberoamerikanischen Raum – wie weltweit –  auch heute noch gotisierende Kirchen errichtet. Einige sind typisch für die Neugotik, andere, wie die Almudena-Kathedrale in Madrid oder diejenige von Vitoria-Gasteiz, scheinen als verspätete Bauten des 20. Jahrhundert aus europäischer Sicht aus der Zeit gefallen zu sein. Doch wird gerade in Lateinamerika bis heute an zahlreichen solcher Projekte weitergebaut.
So scheint es zunächst sinnvoll zu überprüfen, ob die stillschweigende Annahme, „die Gotik“ sei eine abgeschlossene Stilepoche, aus globaler Perspektive überhaupt stimmt. Wie ging die zweifellos zunächst kolonial begründete Gotik-Ausbreitung in den überseeischen Gebieten der ehemals spanischen und portugiesischen Weltreiche in eine eigene postkoloniale Adaption über, welche Gründe gab es hierfür und welche stilistischen Ausprägungen wurden und werden gefunden? Wie begann die Entwicklung in den „Mutterländern“? Ist sie dort und in den ehemaligen Kolonien ähnlich oder unterschiedlich verlaufen, gibt es fortdauernde Verbindungen? Lassen sich Parallelen in anderen Weltregionen beobachten? Sind die Phänomene alleine auf die Gotik beschränkt oder gibt es Parallelen für andere Stile?
Im Workshop der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V. soll diese Problematik stichprobenartig untersucht werden. Denn ein systematischer Gesamtüberblick ist zur Zeit kaum möglich, sind doch nicht einmal die potenziell wichtigsten Bauten bekannt.

PROGRAMM:
FREITAG, DEN 26.10.2018

Eröffnung / Begrüßung / Einführung
9.30 Uhr
Grußworte
Prof. Dr. Antonio Hurtado (Dresden), Prorektor der TU Dresden
Prof. Dr. Lutz Hagen (Dresden), Dekan der Philosophischen Fakultät
Prof. Dr. Margit Kern (Hamburg), Vorstand der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V.

10.00 Uhr
Bruno Klein (Dresden): Gotische Architektur des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts –
global – kolonial − postkolonial

10.45 Uhr
Pablo de la Riestra (Nürnberg/Buenos Aires): Einmal Gotik – immer Gotik

11.30 Uhr Pause

Von der Neugotik zur Moderne:
Kastilische und katalanische Beispiele
12.00 Uhr
Henrik Karge (Dresden):
Vicente Lampérez y Romea – Gotik als Idealbild und historisches Phänomen

12.45 Uhr
Judith Urbano (Barcelona): La finalización de la Catedral de Barcelona y otros proyectos neogóticos de Augusto Font y Carreras

13.30 Uhr Pause

15.30
Joan Molet Petit (Barcelona):
Las interpretaciones del gótico en la obra del arquitecto Josep Vilaseca, entre lo arqueologista y lo victoriano

16.15 Uhr
Sergio Fuentes Mila (Barcelona): Revisitar el gótico en la arquitectura civil barcelonesa de finales del siglo XIX. El caso del arquitecto José Doménech y Estapá (1858-1917)

17.00 Uhr
Bettina Marten (Bonn/Dresden): Considerations on the Almudena-Cathedral at Madrid

18.00 Mitgliederversammlung der CJV

20.00 Uhr
Gemeinsames Abendessen

SAMSTAG,  DEN 27.10.2018

Die „moderne“ Neugotik in Lateinamerika
10.00 Uhr
Bruno Klein: Einführung

10.15 Uhr
Martín Checa Artasu (Mexiko-Stadt/Barcelona):
The religious orders as diffusers of the neo-gothic architecture in Latin America

11.00 Uhr
María Aranda Alonso (Madrid/Dresden):
El templo de la Merced de San José de Costa Rica : Punto de partida para estudiar el neogótico en Centroamérica

11.45 Uhr
Paula Vermeersch (São Paulo):
O processo construtivo da Catedral da Sé, São Paulo, 1911-1954

12.30 Uhr
Barbara Borngässer (Dresden):
Neugotik und Moderne im Süden Brasiliens: Die Kirchenbauten Gottfried Böhms

13.15 Uhr
Abschlussdiskussion

16.00 Uhr
Besichtigung aktueller „gotischer“ Architektur in Dresden (Schlosskapelle,  Sophienkirchen-Monument)

Kontakt:
bruno.klein@tu-dresden.de
barbara.borngaesser@online.de
bettina.marten1@tu-dresden.de

CFP: The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400, Valladolid, June 7–8, 2019

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 Tabernacle-shrine from Mule,
Iceland, now in the Nationalmuseet
in Conpenhagen; c.1250.
Photo: Justin Kroesen

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

How to Submit: Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es.

Deadline: Friday 18th of January 2019.

All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Museu de Lleida: diocesà i comarcal.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th  of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th  of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

CFP: Sacred Images in the Iberian Americas until 1700: Processes, Strategies and Agents, Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March 2019

1024px-our_lady_of_guadalupeSACRED IMAGES IN THE IBERIAN AMERICAS UNTIL 1700: PROCESSES, STRATEGIES AND AGENTS

This panel proposes an approach to the phenomenon of sacred images through three main elements: processes, strategies and agents. The mark of the sacred and the miraculous was achieved by different procedures: hierophanies, thaumaturgy, paranormal phenomena (sweating, weeping, mobility). Definitely, the agency of the sculpture or the painting of religious images blossomed in the Iberian Americas, in need of tradition and sacralization.
Texts about the inventio, the hierophany and other manifestations of the image relate the processes of creation and the evolution of these images until marked by the sacred. In most cases, they follow patterns, repeated to the point of being able to establish a rhetoric of the sacred image. In many cases, these stories, regardless of their historical veracity, provide us valuable information about the strategies devised by the agents. Empowered by their sacred image, these agents (religious orders, patrons…) are in a position to get economic benefits (charity, exemptions), political ones (preferential treatment), and they can build an identity at various levels (territorial, ethnic, political…). The huge amount of textual and visual sources allows to deal with case studies in order to understand the crucial role of the image, through the sacred, in the Ibero-American space of this time.
We invite submissions of proposals for 20 minutes presentations that explore case-studies or some of the many aforementioned aspects of sacred images in the Iberian Americas (also Iberian Asia can be considered) between 16th and 17th century.
Please submit abstracts (200 words maximum), along with a title and a CV (300 word maximum including full name, current affiliation and email address) to Escardiel González (escardielge@gmail.com) and Daniel Expósito Sánchez (daniel.exposito@upr.edu) by August 10, 2018.

More information in: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696697/Art-History-CfPs-for-RSA-2019-Toronto

CFP: Visualizing Scientific Thinking and Religion in the Early Modern Iberian World, CAA 107th Annual Conference, New York, February 13–16, 2019

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Fray Bernadino de Sahagún, The Florentine Codex, 1540–85

Chairs: Brendan C. McMahon (bcmcmaho@umich.edu), Emily Floyd (emilycfloyd@gmail.com)

In recent years, the consideration of visual and material sources has greatly enriched the study of a wide range of scientific practices in the early modern period. As scholars have moved away from characterizing “art” and “science” as discrete categories, they have increasingly turned to paintings, prints, and other forms of artistic production as a means to explore how early modern actors came to understand their experiences of the natural world. While the vast majority of these studies focus on the visual and material culture of Protestant Northern Europe, a small but growing number investigate similar trends in Spain and the Spanish Americas. Yet even as scholars have turned to instances where visual thinking formed a central component of scientific practices in this region, they have been more tentative to consider how religion, and particularly Catholicism, shaped such practices in this context.
This session seeks papers that consider the intersections of visual production, scientific thinking, and religion in the early modern Iberian world, investigating such themes as:
• Material culture, techne, and artisanal epistemologies
• The mobilization of indigenous American and creole systems of natural knowledge
• The Catholic Enlightenment
• Healing, disease, and visual production
• Visual and material culture, theology, and natural philosophical argument
• Epistemic images in the early modern Iberian world
To submit a proposal, please email a 250-word abstract, CV, and proposal form to bcmcmaho@umich.edu and emilycfloyd@gmail.com by Monday August 6, 2018.