Tag Archives: 15th Century

Lecture: ‘Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance’, by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, Conference Room 1, National Gallery, London, 4 September 2019, 2:30–3:30pm

ARTES committee member Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, assistant curator of the exhibition “Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance” at The National Gallery, will give a lecture on the life and works of this Spanish painter.

Bartolomé Bermejo was a fifteenth-century Spanish artist whose painting technique, mixing Spanish and Netherlandish features, was unparalleled amongst his Iberian contemporaries. He had a limited output of less than twenty paintings of which seven are featured in the current National Gallery exhibition. This is the first time that six of these paintings are shown in the UK and the restoration of the National Gallery’s painting of Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil (1468) has enabled the Gallery to showcase Bermejo’s earliest masterpiece. Following the two major Bermejo retrospectives at the Prado Museum and the MNAC (Barcelona), this exhibition features paintings ranging from different periods of Bermejo’s career demonstrating his development as he moved throughout the Crown of Aragon (mostly encompassing territories in eastern Spain). This talk will focus on the seven paintings shown in the exhibition considering them within their context and retracing Bermejo’s artistic career. Bermejo’s Saint Michael, the Acqui Terme triptych and the Desplà Pietà (reproduced above), will receive special attention in the lecture, which will compare their donors, production, intended location and historical context.

This event is for a general audience and is organised by the Instituto Cervantes — London. Free, reistration required. Click here to register.

Advertisements

Opens Today: Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance, National Gallery, London, until 29 September 2019

bjo_desktopbannerBermejo is one of the greatest Spanish artists of the second half of the 15th century.

This exhibition, in the National Gallery’s Room 1, brings two of his masterpieces: the triptych of the ‘Madonna of Montserrat’ from the cathedral at Acqui Terme, Alessandria (Italy) and the ‘Piedad Desplà’ from Barcelona Cathedral, to the UK for the first time.

In addition, The National Gallery’s own painting by Bermejo, the magnificent ‘Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil‘, returns on display following its recent conservation, revealing the painting’s exquisite details and the extent of Bermejo’s artistry.

Click here for more information, and click here for ARTES’ Study Morning in the exhibiton (27 June 2019).

‘Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance’ Study Morning, Thursday 27 June 2019, 9:00 am, The National Gallery, London

ARTES members are cordially invited to an informal study morning in the exhibition Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance, which will open on 12 June at the National Gallery, London (until 29 September 2019).

Programme (27 June 2019)

9:00 am: Meet at The National Gallery’s West Entrance (Staff Entrance to the left of the main portico on Trafalgar Square)

9:15 am: Welcome, curator’s introduction and discussion in the exhibition (led by Letizia Treves)

11:00–11:20 am: Complimentary tea and coffee in the Former Viewing Room, Wilkins Building

11:20–11:30 am: Brief overview of the exhibition Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light (Akemi Herráez) in the Former Viewing Room

11:30 am: Self-guided tour (complimentary tickets will be provided) of Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light (Sainsbury Wing, Level -2)

Attendees may leave their belongings at the West Entrance on arrival. After 11.30 am these must be checked into the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery.

Please note that this study morning is by invitation only. Numbers are strictly limited and places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. We kindly ask you to RSVP to colloquia.RSVP@ng-london.org.uk by Thursday 6 June 2019.

New rules to protect Machu Picchu World Heritage Site

The Peruvian government announced on Friday 10 May a two-week restriction to three important areas at Machu Picchu to prevent greater degradation to the iconic Inca citadel, whose name means “old mountain” in the Quechua language indigenous to the area. The mountain-top citadel lies around 100 kilometres (60 miles) from the Andean city of Cusco, the old Inca capital in south-eastern Peru, and was built during the reign of the Inca emperor Pachacuti (1438-1471). It was rediscovered in 1911 by the American explorer Hiram Bingham and declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1983.

From May 15 to 28 2019, access to the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of the Condor and the Intihuatana Stone will be strictly controlled, the Peruvian government said. “These measures are necessary to conserve Machu Picchu, given the evidence of deterioration” on stone surfaces caused by visitors to the three areas, the culture ministry said. Almost 6,000 visitors a day are permitted onto the 15th-century site in two waves. The new plan will give tourists just three hours to visit the three emblematic areas. The authorities will evaluate the impact of the measures before applying new permanent rules from June 1.

Click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: Revealing, Reversible and Resplendent: 15th-17th-Century Italian and Spanish Textiles, Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, until 16 June 2019

Orphrey fragment (detail), Late 16th-early 17th century. Italian/Spanish. Silk and linen, 23 7/8 x 8 3/8 inches. 2008.45.

This exhibition showcases silk and linen fragments spanning the 15th to 17th centuries, a period of expanded exploration and trade, when Italy and Spain emerged as major centres of textile production. During this era, textiles with three-dimensional effects became popular within the Christian church and the secular world. Cloth and threads were fashioned into elaborate embroidery, gilded three-dimensional images, brilliantly-hued reversible fabrics, and even textiles purposely cut in a pattern that revealed glimpses of one’s undergarments below—a style fashionable during the 17th century. To create relief images, professionally trained embroiderers attached applied work, or appliqués, onto garments, such as orphreys – decorative panels for church vestments.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

Seminar: Dr Núria Ramón Marqués, ‘The Prayerbook of Alfonso of Aragon and Manuscript Illumination in Early 15th-Century Valencia’, Courtauld Institute of Art, 20 February 2019, 5–6pm

psalter

The Prayerbook of Alfonso of Aragon and Manuscript Illumination in Early 15th-Century Valencia

Wednesday 20 February 2019
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Free and open to all

Research Forum Seminar Room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, King’s Cross, London, WC1X 9EW

The Psalter-Book of Hours of Alfonso V the Magnanimous is one of the most important illuminated books commissioned by this Valencian monarch. This king used the book as an instrument of propaganda concerning his royal authority and piety, making this manuscript one of the most important records of the social history of medieval Valencia. A presentation of the miniatures will be accompanied by a brief introduction to Valencian manuscripts of the period, essential to understanding the specific characteristics of the complex manuscript studied here. The production process of the manuscript will also be analysed, and an attempt will be made to establish connections between this and other codices made in Valencia at the same date, trying to generate possible inflection points between these pieces and to define the artistic personalities who participated in this book of hours.

Dr. Nuria Ramón-Marqués is a lecturer in Art History at the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Her research focuses on the study of painting and illuminated manuscripts from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries in the Crown of Aragon. Her doctoral thesis on the study of the Valencian medieval miniature, entitled The illumination of manuscripts in Valencia Gothic. From the beginning until the death of Alfonso V the Magnanimous (1290–1458) (2 vol. Universitat de València, 2005), made possible the reconstruction of the artistic personality of the Valencian miniaturist Domingo Crespí. Nuria is the author of several articles and books including The illumination of manuscripts in Gothic Valencia (1290–1458) (Valencia, 2007) that continues to have a significant scientific impact since it constitutes the most complete corpus of these works and a reference in the area of medieval painting and miniature.

Click here for more information

Opens today: Bartolomé Bermejo at the Prado Museum, Madrid

d157b0ca-7d78-4246-af56-46820d6c60b5

Open until 27 January 2019, this exhibition explores the career of Bartolomé Bermejo, one of the most fascinating figures within Spanish art of the second half of the 15th century. Bringing together a remarkable group of paintings from Spanish, European and American museums, the Prado is able to present this survey exhibition, which has been organized with the collaboration of the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya and, for the first time, allows for an appreciation of the technical virtuosity and distinctive visual universe of this Cordovan painter active in the Kingdom of Aragon.

For more information, click here.