Tag Archives: Prado

Featured Exhibition: Lightness and Boldness. Goya’s Drawings

 

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Francisco de Goya, I am still learning. Album G, 54
Ca. 1826. Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper, 192 x 145 mm.

Ligereza y atrevimiento. Dibujos de Goya, Centro Botín, Santander. Closes 24 September 2017.
One of the first exhibitions in the  recently opened Renzo Piano designed Centro Botín, this show is curated by the Prado’s Head of Drawings and Prints, José Manuel Matilla, and the Chief Curator of the Goya and 18th-century Art Department, Manuela Mena. The exhibition includes 80 drawings, from the Prado’s holdings of some 520, selected as representative of the different periods of Goya’s artistic activity from 1796 to his death in 1828. Also shown are preparatory drawings for a selection of prints from his series, Sueños, Caprichos, Desastres de la guerra, Tauromaquia and Disparates. This exhibition is the result of an ambitious research and cataloguing project based on the drawings of Francisco de Goya, thanks to the collaboration agreement entered into by the Fundación Botín and  Prado Museum in 2014. The first volume of the catalogue raisonné is due to appear later in 2017 and a larger exhibition is provisionally scheduled at the Prado in 2019.

 

Featured Exhibition: The challenge of white. Goya and Esteve, portraitists to the House of Osuna

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Francisco de Goya, The Duke and Duchess of Osuna and their Children, 1787 – 1788. Oil on unlined canvas, 225 x 174 cm.

El desafío del blanco. Goya and Esteve, retratistas de la Casa de Osuna/portraitists to the House of Osuna, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid. Closes 1 October 2017

This displays presents for the first time in the Prado the portrait of Manuela Isidra Téllez-Girón, the future Duchess of Abrantes, which was painted in 1797 by Agustín Esteve y Marqués, and which was recently acquired with the help of funds from the donation by Óscar Alzaga Villaamil. The child’s portrait is considered one of the finest works by the Valencian-born Esteve, the most important court portraitist after Goya. The exhibition brings together for the first time all the portraits painted by Agustín Esteve of the children of the Duke and Duchess of Osuna, on loan from private collections such as the Fundación Casa Ducal de Medinaceli, the Colección Duque del Infantado, Colección Masaveu and Colección Martínez Lanzas-de las Heras. In addition the display is accompanied by portraits of the 9th Duke Osuna, Pedro de Alcántara Téllez-Girón (1755-1807) and his wife and cousin, María Josefa de la Soledad Alonso-Pimentel (1752-1834), and their five children by other court artists including Goya’s family portrait of 1787-88 and a miniature by Guillermo Ducker (fl. 1795-1830) of Joaquina Téllez-Girón, Marchioness of Santa Cruz. The exhibition’s title refers to Esteve’s and Goya’s ability to meet the challenge of representing the transparent and pristine white materials worn by their sitters.

This is the final purchase with the Alzaga funds and in October 2017 the Prado will display the other six paintings in the Alzaga donation, which range from the sixteenth-century to the middle of the nineteenth-century and include works by Sánchez Cotán, Herrera “el Viejo,” Antonio del Castillo, and Eugenio Lucas Velázquez. The display will be accompanied by a catalogue of the donation.

Curators in Conversation: Ribera across the Generations. 6:30-8:30 pm, Thursday 9th February, 2017

 

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With
Gabriele Finaldi (Director, The National Gallery) &
Edward Payne (Senior Curator: Spanish Art, Auckland Castle Trust)
at
Colnaghi, 26 Bury Street, London SW1Y 6AL

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ARTES welcomes Gabriele Finaldi, curator of Ribera: Master of Drawing at the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid (22 November 2016 – 19 February 2017), in conversation with Edward Payne, curator of the exhibition’s second incarnation Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera at the Meadows Museum, Dallas (12 March – 11 June 2017). They will be discussing the genesis of the exhibition which celebrates the publication of the first complete catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings. The event will take place in the stunning new Colnaghi gallery in Bury Street, followed by wine and jamón provided by Spanish restaurateurs Brindisa.

ARTES would like to thank the Instituto Cervantes and its Director, Julio Crespo Maclennan for their support with this event.

This event is open to ARTES members only. RSVP to Alice@colnaghi.com

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Murillo to Goya, Dallas and Madrid

2014-06-Murillo-Meadows-HamburgThe Spanish Gesture: Drawings from Murillo to Goya from the Hamburger Kunsthalle, Meadows Museum, Dallas, Texas, May 25-August 31, 2014.
The Kunsthalle of Hamburg holds one of the most significant collections of Spanish drawings found outside of Spain, containing works by Alonso Cano, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Juan de Valdés Leal and Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, among others. This is the first exhibition to present the collection on a large scale, 123 years after they were purchased. As part of the continued collaboration between the Meadows Museum and the Prado, the jointly organized exhibition will present around 80 drawings, first in Dallas, then at the Prado, Madrid.

ARTES visit to Madrid, 28-29 January 2014

Portrait of Pope Innocent X

Portrait of Pope Innocent X

We have been kindly invited by Deputy Director of the Prado and ARTES member Gabriele Finaldi to visit the current exhibition in Madrid on Velázquez and the Family of Philip IV.  Javier Portús, Chief Curator of Spanish Painting and Curator of the exhibition will kindly take us on a private tour on Tuesday 28th January 2014, starting at 10.00 and meeting at the Puerta de Jerónimos. After the tour, members will have the opportunity to view for themselves some of the paintings highlighted in Gabriele’s 2012 ARTES Lecture, The Collections of the Prado: new works and restored paintings Director of Conservation and Research at the Prado (featured in InformARTES, 2012, pp. 6-8).

The following day (for those able to stay another night) Mercedes González Amezúa Curator of Paintings at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando has also kindly agreed to take us on a tour of the Academia to tie in with the popular talk she gave earlier this year for the 2013 ARTES Lecture, Highlights from the Collection of Manuel Godoy & Recent Acquisitions of the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando (featured in the forthcoming edition of InformARTES). We will meet at the ticket office at the entrance to the Academia, in front of the Hércules Farnese at 10.30am.

We will try and organise a meal together on the Tuesday evening. Please contact Morlin.Ellis@tiscali.co.uk as soon as possible if you are interested and are able to join us for both or either of these two visits.

Velázquez portraits exhibition at the Prado

Velazquez, Juan Martínez Montañés, Prado

Velazquez, Juan Martínez Montañés, Prado

Tues 8 Oct 2013 – Sat 9 Feb 2014, The Prado, Madrid. Velázquez y la familia de Felipe IV 1650-1680 (the English catalogue is titled, Velázquez, Las Meninas and the Late Royal Portraits).  Jerónimos Building, Room C, El Museo del Prado, Ruiz de Alarcón, 23, 28014 Madrid. www.museodelprado.es . Curated by Javier Portús, Chief Curator of Spanish Painting at the Museo del Prado.

In chronological terms, the exhibition opens in 1650 during Velázquez’s second period in Rome, at which date he had already spent more than a year outside Spain. In Rome, the artist painted around a dozen portraits of individuals associated with the papal court, of which four of the surviving six are included in the exhibition.

They constitute a separate chapter within the artist’s oeuvre and one in which he markedly extended his expressive registers in order to brilliantly convey the personalities and concerns of these sitters.

Portrait of Pope Innocent X

Portrait of Pope Innocent X

The exhibition opens with the Portrait of Innocent X from Apsley House, London. A version of the celebrated portrait in the Doria Pamphilj Gallery, Velázquez brought it back with him to Madrid. It will now be exhibited in Spain for the first time.

Also on display in this gallery are the portraits of Cardinal Camillo Massimo (The Bankes Collection, National Trust, UK), Cardinal Camillo Astalli Pamphilj (Hispanic Society of America, New York), and Ferdinando Brandani (Museo del Prado), chief clerk to the papal secretariat, the latter a new identification of a work previously known as “the Pope’s Barber”.

While Velázquez was in Rome, Mariana of Austria had married Philip IV and the city welcomed the arrival of the new Queen in late 1649. The second section in the exhibition focuses on the artist’s return to the capital in 1651 after much insisting on the King’s part. It presents comparisons between some of the Roman portraits and those Velázquez executed for the court after his return. Philip IV (Museo del Prado), The Infanta María Teresa (Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) and Queen Mariana of Austria (Museo del Prado) reveal how the painter once again deployed the hieratic distance evident in his earlier royal portraits as opposed to the expressivity of the Roman period.

This return to the court constitutes the core of the exhibition, comprising the royal portraits that Velázquez produced from his arrival in Madrid until his death in 1660. Together they form a separate chapter in his career due to their technical and iconographic uniqueness and exceptionally high quality.

The Infanta Margarita in blue and gold

The Infanta Margarita in blue and gold

At this period the world of women and children makes its appearance in the artist’s work and is the subject of the third room, which includes The Infanta María Teresa, Prince Felipe Próspero and The Infanta Margarita in blue and gold, all loaned from the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. During this period Velázquez’s colour became denser and more rich and varied, while the compositions included spatial references arising from the settings. Particularly outstanding within this group is Las Meninas, which will not be hung in the exhibition (remaining in its habitual location in the Museum) but which is a key element in this group given that it represents a remarkable defence of the genre of portrait painting. Its complexity makes its comparable to the most erudite type of “history painting” and it can be seen as the finest example of the level of sophistication achieved by the Spanish court at a high point of cultural creativity. In addition, Las Meninas also represents a profound exercise of social and professional affirmation on Velázquez’s part through the inclusion of his self-portrait.

The demand for images following the new Queen’s arrival and the birth of infants and princes meant that Velázquez was obliged to produce more portraits, to which he responded by setting up an active studio that is represented in this exhibition by various studio versions of originals by the artist, created under his supervision. They include The Infanta Margarita and Queen Mariana of Austria (both Musée du Louvre, Paris). The exhibition concludes with examples of court portraiture by Velázquez’s successors Martínez del Mazo and Carreño. Both artists looked to their predecessor’s solutions in order to move royal iconography towards a more complex, Baroque style and to create a particularly Spanish typology for the court portrait that differs from other European schools in its inclusion of particular rooms in the royal palaces as the settings for these works.

The catalogue

The accompanying catalogue –Spanish and English editions – includes three essays: the principal one by the exhibition’s curator Javier Portús; another on painting at the Spanish court after the death of Velázquez by Miguel Morán Turina of the Universidad Complutense, Madrid; and a third that analyses aspects of the court in Vienna by Andrea Sommer-Mathis of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.