Tag Archives: Murillo

Failed restoration of a copy of a Murillo painting makes headlines, once again raising the problem of insufficient regulation of art conservation in Spain

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo’s original work (left) and two attempts at restoring a copy of it. Photograph: Cedida por Coleccionista/Europa Press 2020

News outlets across the globe have shared the story of another failed restoration in Spain. The work was a copy of Murillo’s The Immaculate Conception of El Escorial, and the original remains unscathed at the Prado. It is important to note that the viral image above is slightly misleading, as it compares the two ‘restored’ versions (right) to Murillo’s original painting (left), rather than to the copy before the restoration effort.

The copied painting belongs to a private art collector in Valencia, who had hired a furniture restorer to clean the work. The collector has now asked another specialist to attempt to fix the botched restoration.

The Association of Conservators and Restorers in Spain (ACRE) has released a statement, stating that they ‘regret once again the loss of a cultural asset and, under these circumstances, we request not to take this instance as a social media source of fun, as happened already formerly. Moreover, we all must be alarmed to think that our heritage is disappearing because of these disastrous actions’. They also emphasize that ‘no professional technician with an official academic training would perform such an attempt against cultural heritage’. They warn against the lack of regulations for art conservation in Spain, which ‘allows unskilled people intervening on [art], facing, at best, mere administrative penalties’.

Information for this post was culled from: The Guardian, The New York Times, The BBC, Artnet, and Europa Press (in Spanish)

New Funding Opportunity: John Phillip PhD Scholarship in Spanish art and visual culture at the School of Art History, University of St Andrews

Deadline: Monday 25 May 2020

The School of Art History at the University of St Andrews is delighted to invite applications for the John Phillip Doctoral Scholarship in Spanish Art and Visual Culture, to start in September 2020.

Generously funded by the Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica (CEEH), the doctoral scholarship is named after the nineteenth-century Scottish artist John Phillip (1817-1867), who travelled extensively in Spain, and whose work was strongly inspired by the art of Velázquez and Murillo.

The scholarship is available to both Home/EU and Overseas candidates, and is tenable for three years (full-time). It is a full scholarship, covering tuition fees, plus an annual stipend of £15,285 for living expenses, and an annual research allowance of £5,000.

The scholarship will fund a doctoral research project that focuses on the history of Spanish art and visual culture between ca. 1600 and 1700. We will also consider research projects devoted to the reception of seventeenth-century Spanish art in later periods, up to ca. 1900.

Applicants should apply via the University of St Andrews application process: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/research/

The deadline for applications is Monday 25 May 2020.

For informal queries, intending applicants may contact Dr José Ramón Marcaida (jrm32@st-andrews.ac.uk).

Click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: Murillo: The Prodigal Son Restored, Hugh Lane Room, National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, until 30 August 2020

Six remarkable paintings by one of the most celebrated painters of the Spanish Golden Age, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617–1682), have been conserved and researched at the National Gallery of Ireland. They depict the parable of the Prodigal Son. Fascinating details uncovered during the conservation project and a number of related prints will be displayed alongside the series, revealing the secrets of the artistic process of this master storyteller.

Click here for more information.

Generously supported by the Blavatnik Family Foundation

Curators| Muirne Lydon and Dr Aoife Brady

Murillo Study Day, National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, 28 February 13.30–17.30

This event will feature an afternoon of presentations and a special exhibition preview in celebration of the opening of Murillo: The Prodigal Son Restored at the National Gallery of Ireland.

Showcasing a unique series of works by one of the most celebrated artists of the Spanish Golden Age, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682), this in-focus exhibition explores themes of sin, repentance and forgiveness across six remarkable canvases. Donated to the National Gallery of Ireland by the Beit family in 1987, the six works have not been displayed together publicly for several decades. Murillo: The Prodigal Son Restored will celebrate the recent conservation of the series, which has revived the splendour of Murillo’s colours, brushwork, and mastery of narrative.

12pm – 1.15pmExhibition preview (Present your ticket for admission) Hugh Lane Room, Beit Wing, Level 3
1.15pm – 1.25pmRegistration Lecture Theatre, Beit Wing, Level -1
1.30pmWelcome Sean Rainbird, Director, National Gallery of Ireland
1.35pmIntroduction  Dr Aoife Brady, Curator, National Gallery of Ireland
1.50pmMurillo: The Prodigal Son Revisited Muirne Lydon, Conservator, National Gallery of Ireland
2.10pmThe Prodigal Son series. “Quatro cuadritos” by Murillo in the Museo del Prado. Elena Cenalmor Bruquetas, Researcher, Museo del Prado
2.30pmDiscoveries and Display: Murillo’s Virgin and Child in Glory Kate O’Donoghue, Curator, National Museums Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery
2.55pmQuestions and discussion
3.10pmTea / coffee Courtyard
3.50pmIntroduction Prof. Stefano Cracolici, Director, Zurbarán Centre
4pm“All rooms are furnished with great works of art” – the Beit collection Pauline Swords, Curator, Russborough, Co. Wicklow
4.20pmA Painter of Street Urchins and Beggars? The perception of Murillo in Britain. Isabelle Kent, Independent scholar
4.40pm“Something of immortal value”: Murillo at the Meadows Museum Dr Amanda Dotseth, Curator, Meadows Museum, Dallas
5.05pmQuestions and discussion
5.20pmClose

Click here for more information and to book tickets (Full price €25, students/OAPs €22.50, Friends €20)

Featured Exhibition: ‘De Mena, Murillo, Zurbarán. Masters of the Spanish Baroque’, Sint-Janshospitaal, Bruges, until 6 October and MNHA, Luxembourg, 24 January–07 June 2020

20 works of Spanish religious sculpture and painting are currently on display in the monumental wards of the ancient hospital of Bruges. It is a rare opportunity to become acquainted with some lesser-known aspects of Spain’s Golden Age. The highlight of the exhibition, in addition to paintings by famous Spanish masters like Murillo and Zurbaran, is a group of six hyper-realistic sculptures by the greatest sculptor of the Spanish Baroque, Pedro de Mena.
This project is in collaboration with the Luxemburg Musée National d’Histoire et d’Art and the exhibition will travel to this museum in 2020.
The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue in English, with texts by Ruud Priem, Sibylla Goegebuer, Malgorzata Nowara, Gilles Zeimat, and Noël Geirnaert. Click here for more information on the exhibition and here for the catalogue.

Maius Workshop Meeting: Alex Letvin, ‘Baroque Rivals? Zurbarán and Murillo Between Seville and Madrid’

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place on 18 February, 5–6pm, in the Research Forum, Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, Kings Cross, London WC1X 9EW (*Please note the change of address).

Alex Letvin, Andrew W. Mellon and Maude de Schauensee Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow in the Department of European Painting and Sculpture at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will discuss work-in-progress research on Spanish Golden Age painters Zurbarán and Murillo. 

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at Alex’s presentation, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future events.

ARTES Glendinning Lecture: Javier Barón, ‘Two Masters of the Prado: Velázquez, El Greco and Modern Painting’, Instituto Cervantes, London, 27 February 2019

Screenshot 2019-02-01 at 13.31.04This year’s Glendinning Lecture, an annual event in honour of the great Hispanist Nigel Glendinning, will celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Museo Nacional del Prado.

Dr Javier Barón will deliver a lecture on how Velázquez and El Greco influenced modern painting.

From its opening in 1819, the Prado offered artists a unique opportunity to study the oeuvre of Spanish Old Masters, especially Murillo, Velázquez and El Greco. This was, precisely, the chronological order in which these masters influenced foreign painters.

During the nineteenth century, Velázquez was the most appreciated Spanish master. The Prado owned the most extensive collection of this artist in the world. So, many painters, amongst them Wilkie, Courbet, Manet, Renoir, Sargent, Chase and others came to Madrid to see his masterworks. Velázquez’s approach to everyday life, as well as his large and loose brushstrokes, were relevant to naturalistic painters.

El Greco was especially appreciated after the first monographic exhibition of his work took place at the Prado in 1902. His influence was already important in the mainstream renewal of painting spearheaded by Pablo Picasso and cubism in Paris. At the same time, El Greco was the major reference for Central European Expressionism. American artists also appreciated the suggestiveness of his painting when seeking to lay the foundation of their own modernity.

Javier Barón is Doctor in History of Art by the University of Oviedo, where he was graduated with honours back in 1989. Before joining Prado Museum, he was a professor of Art History at the University of Oviedo (1991–2002). In 2003, Barón was appointed as Head of Nineteenth-century Painting Department at the Prado Museum, a position he held until 2014, when he became Senior Curator. He is correspondent member of the Spanish Royal Academy of History, the Spanish Royal Academy of Fine Arts and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Telmo, in Málaga, as well as member of the Royal Institute of Asturian Studies, Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, member of the Board of Trustees of the Sorolla Museum and Member of the Madrid City Council Board of Valuation of Works of Art.

Free and open to all, but please book a ticket here.

Enriqueta Harris Frankfort Bequest at the Warburg Institute, London

enquitsaNew shelving at the end of the Warburg Institute’s Photographic Collection contains the notes, papers, letters and photographs of Enriqueta Harris Frankfort (1919–2006), Curator of the Photographic Collection from 1949 to 1971, founding Honorary President of ARTES, and one of the most admired writers on Spanish painting of her generation.

All her working papers were left to the Warburg Institute with the request that they be kept together as a resource for future historians of Spanish art. Enriqueta’s bequest provides rich documentation on many artists, especially El Greco, Velázquez, Murillo and Goya.

For more information, visit the Warburg Institute‘s website.

ARTES Members’ Visit to the Año Murillo in Seville (30 November – 2 December 2018)

murillo

ARTES have organised a trip to Seville for members from 30th November to 2nd December 2018, the main aim being a curator-led tour of the exhibition Murillo IV Centenario, opening that week, as well as visits to the Cathedral, Hospital de los Venerables and de la Caridad, Alcázar, Casa de Pilatos and other sites of art historical significance.

Members must make their own travel and accommodation arrangements but should plan to arrive by Friday evening. A full programme (from Friday night to Sunday early evening) will be posted nearer the time.

murilloII

 ARTES members wishing to join the trip should RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com.    Places will be limited to 15 and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis.*

*We may ask for a deposit to secure a place with the money put towards the cost of dinner on Saturday night.


Images: Moses Striking the Rock at Horeb, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad

Jesus Multiplies the Loaves and Fishes, c. 1669–70, oil on canvas, 263 x 575 cm, Seville, Hospital de la Santa Caridad