Category Archives: Exhibition

Featured Exhibition: Gala Salvador Dalí: A Room of One’s Own in Púbol, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, until 14 October

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Salvador Dalí. Gala Placidia. Galatea of the Spheres, 1952. Fundació Gala- Salvador Dalí, Figueres © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018

Gala (7th September 1894 – 10th June 1982), born into a family of intellectuals from Kazan (Russia), spent her childhood in Moscow before moving to Switzerland and then Paris. There she befriended such prominent members of the surrealist movement as Max Ernst. In 1929 she travelled to Cadaqués, where she met Dalí. The two fell in love and started to live together, first during an eight-year exile in the United States and then in Portlligat, New York and Paris.

Gala, an enigmatic and intuitive lady famous as Salvador Dalí’s wife, muse and model, is the subject of this exhibition. Abandoning traditional stereotypes on the role of this figure, the show follows her transformation into a fully-fledged artist, exploring her artistic cooperation with Dalí and revealing the possible shared authorship of some works.

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Featured Exhibition: Michel Sittow. Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe, until 16 September at The Kumu Museum, Tallinn

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Born in Tallinn, Michel Sittow, studied in the studio of his father Clawes van der Sittow, a respected painter and wood carver. In 1484, the young artist headed to Bruges, the art centre of the Netherlands at the time, probably to work in the studio of Hans Memling, a German who was the town’s most sought-after master. There he learned the illusionist technique typical of the Netherlandish school of painting.

From 1492 to 1504, Michel Sittow was in the service of Isabella of Castile, and later worked as a portraitist for Philip the Handsome, Margaret of Austria, Ferdinand of Aragon and Christian II of Denmark. Sittow returned to his home-town of Tallinn, first in 1506 in connection with an inheritance dispute, when he joined the local artists’ guild. In 1514, Sittow left for Copenhagen at the invitation of King Christian II, and from there he went on to Spain and the Netherlands. The famous portraitist returned to Tallinn for good in early 1518.
With his diverse heritage (a family with German and Finnish-Swedish roots living in Tallinn) and cosmopolitan career, Sittow did not fit in with the national narrative of art history that prevailed in the first half of the 20th century. However, his cosmopolitan career is all the more relevant in the current European context.

The international exhibition project, which includes multi-faceted collaboration with centres in Europe and the United States, brings Sittow’s extraordinary works from distinguished museums and private collection to his first solo exhibition. This is a unique platform for a broader introduction and further research on the oeuvre of this remarkable artist. Most of Sittow’s small number of works (20 to 25 paintings) are on exhibit, thereby providing an excellent survey of his work as a portraitist and painter of religious works. It also allows us to view his art in a broader context, including in collaboration with Juan de Flandes and other contemporary Netherlandish artists. In addition to the paintings, another section of the exhibition is comprised of a timeline that provides an overview of the 500-year story of Michel Sittow, from his birth and successful career to his fall into oblivion and rediscovery.

The exhibition, which is a collaborative project of the Art Museum of Estonia and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will take place in 2018 in celebration of the centenary of the Republic of Estonia. This year also marks 500 years since Michel Sittow’s final return to his home-town of Tallinn.

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Featured Exhibitions: ‘Zuloaga. Character and Emotion’, Centro Cultural Bancaja, Valencia (until 26 August 2018) and ‘Sorolla and Spirituality’ (until 2 September 2018)

ZuloagaZuloaga. Character and Emotion (until 26 August 2018)

This exhibition features some 66 paintings by the Basque artist, several of which are displayed in public for the first time. Ranging in date from 1888, when Zuloaga was 18, to 1945, the works trace the artist’s development from his training in Paris to the mature work inspired by Spanish artists such as Velázquez, Ribera, Zurbarán, Goya and El Greco. The curators, Sofía Barrón y Carlos Alonso, focus on Zuloaga as both a landscapist and a portraitist. They showcase his representations of turn-of-the-century aristocracy, bourgeoisie and intellectuals, as well as his intimate portraits of family members. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue and is organised in collaboration with the Museo Zuloaga in Pedraza (Segovia) and its president, the artist’s granddaughter, María Rosa Suárez Zuloaga.

SorollaSorolla and Spirituality (until 2 September 2018)

This exhibition features the work Yo soy el pan de la vida, exhibited to the public for the first time since its recent restoration, the result of a collaboration with the owners of the work, the Lladró family. Curated by Felipe Garín, the exhibition explores the religious themes which the Valencian artist explored briefly in the earlier part of his career. It comprises six works produced between 1883 y 1899, including ¡Triste herencia!, Monja en oración, Santa ClotildeMesa petitoria, and La Virgen María, all on loan from major public collections.

Opens today: Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up, V&A Museum, London

640Open until 4 November 2018, this exhibition presents an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico. Click here to book tickets and see related events.

 

Opens today: ‘Woman. Art & Power. Three Habsburg Women’, Schloss Ambras, Innsbruck

fc3a4cher-kk-4751-1-248x4002xRunning until 7th October 2018, this large-scale special exhibition at Ambras Castle, Innsbruck focuses on three remarkable Renaissance women, rulers and collectors of the House of Habsburg engaged in the arts: Margaret of Austria (1480-1530), Mary of Hungary (1505-1558), and Catherine of Austria (1507-1578). This will be the first comparative analysis of courtly female patronage will be undertaken.

This high-calibre exhibition presents some one hundred works from important European collections, including objects from Ambras Castle, Innsbruck and outstanding pieces from the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna.

The major special exhibition is curated by Dagmar Eichberger and Annemarie Jordan Gschwend and will be accompanied by a catalogue in German/English.

Featured Exhibition: Descubriendo a Luis Masson, Museo Lázaro Galdiano, Madrid, until 26 August

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As part of the 20thanniversary edition of the mass photography display of contemporary and historic works, PHotoESPAÑA (6 June-26 August 2018, venues across Madrid, Barcelona and in Valencia), the Museo Lázaro Galdiano in Madrid will open an exhibition Descubriendo a Luis Masson commemorating the work of the French 19th-century photographer Luis Masson (born 1825), who produced a complete topographical photographic study of Spain and was also noted for his photographic reproductions of the works of Murillo. Masson established himself in Seville in 1858 with his wife, Lorenza Simonin, with whom he worked over the next eight years producing a wide range of architectural photographs, some stereoscopic, of Seville and other Andalucian cities and monuments, working in particular for the Duque de Montpensier. In 1866 he moved to Madrid, recording from there the cities of Toledo, Ávila, Valladolid, Salamanca and Burgos, before returning to Seville at the end of the 1870s, where he was last recorded in 1881.The photographs are selected from the private Colección Fernández Rivero de Fotografía Antigua, which owns about 35,000 original photographs ranging from the 1840s through to the early decades of the 20thcentury. It focuses its collections on Spanish images and in particular photographs created in Andalucia, with a special section on Málaga and its province.  The exhibition was previously shown (January-March 2018) at the Centro Andaluz de la Fotografía, Almería. An accompanying monograph by Juan Antonio Fernández Rivero and María Teresa García Ballesteros, Descubriendo a Luis Masson, fotógrafo en la España del XIX which inventories 511 of Masson’s photographs was published by  Ediciones del Genal, Málaga in 2017.

Featured Exhibition: Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, until 22 July 2018

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Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (Mexican, 1713–1772). Portrait of Doña Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas (detail), c. 1762. Galería Coloniart, Collection of Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andrés Siegel, Mexico City. Photo © Rafael Doniz

The vitality and inventiveness of artists in eighteenth-century New Spain (Mexico) is the focus of Pinxit Mexici, an exhibition which presents some 110 works of art (primarily paintings), many of which are unpublished and newly restored. The exhibition surveys the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlights the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. It is the first major exhibition devoted to this neglected topic.

The exhibition is divided in thematic sections: Great Masters; Masters Storytellers and the Art of Expression; Noble Pursuits and the Academy; Paintings of the Land; The Power of Portraiture; The Allegorical World; Imagining the Sacred.

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