Category Archives: Exhibition

Featured Exhibition: Fortuny (1838-1874), Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, until 18 March 2018

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Mariano Fortuny,
Idyll, 1868, watercolour and gouache on paper, Museo Nacional del Prado

The Museo Nacional del Prado has recently opened an exhibition on Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838-1874). This artist, who achieved international renown in the last third of the 19th century, was a skilled painter and draughtsman who excelled in watercolour. He was also a graphic artist and a passionate collector of antiquities.
As with previous monographic exhibitions held at the Prado, Mariano Fortuny (1838-1874) offers a reassessment of the artist’s finest works, drawn from both the the Prado’s extensive holdings and from international lenders, including the more than 30 rarely-seen works from the Museo Fortuny in Venice.

Click here for more information.

 

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Opens Today: Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th Anniversary Celebration, December 6, 2017 – December 2, 2018

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Spanish, 1617–1682), "Saint Justa," c. 1665. Oil on canvas. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Algur H. Meadows Collection, MM.72.04. Photo by Michael BodycombDecember of 2017 will witness the 400th birthday of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617–1682), one of the outstanding painters of Golden Age Seville. The Meadows Museum, which holds more paintings by the artist than any other collection in the United States, will celebrate his anniversary with a special exhibition. The display will celebrate the Meadows’ extraordinary holdings of artworks by the artist, and pair them with paintings by Murillo’s Sevillian contemporaries, thus highlighting the artistic context with which he remains so intimately associated.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

 

Opening soon: Intacta María. Política y religiosidad en la España barroca, 30 November 2017 – 8 April 2018, Museo de Bellas Artes de Valencia

alegorc3ada_de_la_virgen_inmaculada2c_atribuida_a_juan_de_roelas_28museo_nacional_de_escultura_de_valladolid29The exhibition Intacta María. Política y religiosidad en la España barroca, opening on 30 November  2017, analyses the process through which devotion to the Immaculate conception was created and popularised in early modern Spain. While the Immaculate Conception only became dogma in 1854, as early as 1616 the Spanish Monarchy became a staunch supporter of the theory, turning its defence into a national priority. In the following years, the Immaculate Conception became Spain’s most heartfelt devotion and a sign of national identity. Art played an important role in this process, amounting to what we may describe as a marketing campaign. This will be the focus of the Museo de Bellas Artes’ forthcoming exhibition, featuring more than 50 paintings, sculptures, prints and books borrowed from notable Spanish museums and churches such as the Museo Nacional de Escultura de Valladolid, the Cathedral of Seville, the Biblioteca Nacional de España, and many others.

 

Please click here for more information on the exhibition.

ARTES Event: Curator’s tour of ‘El Greco to Goya’ at the Wallace Collection, 21 November 2017, 10 am

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Isabelle Kent, Enriqueta Harris Frankfort curatorial assistant at the Wallace Collection,  will give ARTES members a tour of the exhibition on 21st November at 10:00.
Please RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com by 15 November.
This event is open to ARTES members only.

ARTES Event: Curator’s tour of ‘El Greco to Goya’ at the Wallace Collection, 21 November 2017, 10 am

20424015_10155128772606865_9178298814727747987_o

Isabelle Kent, Enriqueta Harris Frankfort curatorial assistant at the Wallace Collection,  will give ARTES members a tour of the exhibition on 21st November at 10:00.
Please RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com by 15 November.
This event is open to ARTES members only.

Featured Exhibition: Sacred art in the age of contact: Chumash and Latin American traditions in Santa Barbara

smaller20abalone20virgin20mary_1Sacred art in the age of contact: Chumash and Latin American traditions in Santa Barbara, Art, Design & Architecture Museum, University of California, Santa Barbara, until 8 December, 2017.

Sacred Art in the Age of Contact  focuses on the relationship between art and religion in both historic Chumash and Spanish traditions in the early Mission period in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, highlighting themes of devotion, sacred space, language and materiality. The exhibition investigates the mutually transformative interaction among these traditions. Twentieth-century and contemporary Chumash visual production will be on view alongside sacred objects. This exhibition brings together, for the first time, a diverse array of approximately 100 objects, from local collections that include the Mission Santa Inés, Mission La Purísima Concepcíon, the Santa Barbara Mission Museum and Archive-Library, the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, and the Repository for Archaeological and Ethnographic Collections at UC Santa Barbara.

Featured exhibition: Kinesthesia: Latin American Kinetic Art, 1954–1969, Palm Springs Art Museum, until 15 January 2018

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Martha Boto, Déplacements optico-hydrauliques, 1970, Collection of Gérard and Maria Rose Guilbert, Paris. Courtesy of Sicardi Gallery, Houston, © 2017 Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris, Photograph by Logan Sebastian Beck

Kinesthesia: Latin American Kinetic Art, 1954–1969, Palm Springs Art Museum, 26 August 2017 – 15 January, 2018.

This exhibition is the first in-depth examination of the pioneering role played by South American artists in the international Kinetic Art movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Grounded by scholarly research into experimental art movements of the late 1940s and early 1950s in Buenos Aires, Caracas, and Rio de Janeiro.  Kinesthesia  begins its survey with the layered “vibrational” works created by Jesús Rafael Soto for the historic Le Mouvement exhibition at Galerie Denise René in Paris (1955) and goes on to explore more than fifty examples by nine artists, including the works of internationally well-known figures, such as Carlos Cruz-Diez, Gyula Kosice, and Julio Le Parc, alongside the less well known Martha Boto, Horacio García-Rossi, Alejandro Otero, Abraham Palatnik, and Gregorio Vardánega. The exhibition like that at Santa Barbara is part of the Getty Foundation supported Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, an exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.