Category Archives: Exhibition

Featured Exhibitions: ‘Zuloaga. Character and Emotion’, Centro Cultural Bancaja, Valencia (until 26 August 2018) and ‘Sorolla and Spirituality’ (until 2 September 2018)

ZuloagaZuloaga. Character and Emotion (until 26 August 2018)

This exhibition features some 66 paintings by the Basque artist, several of which are displayed in public for the first time. Ranging in date from 1888, when Zuloaga was 18, to 1945, the works trace the artist’s development from his training in Paris to the mature work inspired by Spanish artists such as Velázquez, Ribera, Zurbarán, Goya and El Greco. The curators, Sofía Barrón y Carlos Alonso, focus on Zuloaga as both a landscapist and a portraitist. They showcase his representations of turn-of-the-century aristocracy, bourgeoisie and intellectuals, as well as his intimate portraits of family members. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue and is organised in collaboration with the Museo Zuloaga in Pedraza (Segovia) and its president, the artist’s granddaughter, María Rosa Suárez Zuloaga.

SorollaSorolla and Spirituality (until 2 September 2018)

This exhibition features the work Yo soy el pan de la vida, exhibited to the public for the first time since its recent restoration, the result of a collaboration with the owners of the work, the Lladró family. Curated by Felipe Garín, the exhibition explores the religious themes which the Valencian artist explored briefly in the earlier part of his career. It comprises six works produced between 1883 y 1899, including ¡Triste herencia!, Monja en oración, Santa ClotildeMesa petitoria, and La Virgen María, all on loan from major public collections.

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Opens today: Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up, V&A Museum, London

640Open until 4 November 2018, this exhibition presents an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico. Click here to book tickets and see related events.

 

Opens today: ‘Woman. Art & Power. Three Habsburg Women’, Schloss Ambras, Innsbruck

fc3a4cher-kk-4751-1-248x4002xRunning until 7th October 2018, this large-scale special exhibition at Ambras Castle, Innsbruck focuses on three remarkable Renaissance women, rulers and collectors of the House of Habsburg engaged in the arts: Margaret of Austria (1480-1530), Mary of Hungary (1505-1558), and Catherine of Austria (1507-1578). This will be the first comparative analysis of courtly female patronage will be undertaken.

This high-calibre exhibition presents some one hundred works from important European collections, including objects from Ambras Castle, Innsbruck and outstanding pieces from the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna.

The major special exhibition is curated by Dagmar Eichberger and Annemarie Jordan Gschwend and will be accompanied by a catalogue in German/English.

Featured Exhibition: Descubriendo a Luis Masson, Museo Lázaro Galdiano, Madrid, until 26 August

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As part of the 20thanniversary edition of the mass photography display of contemporary and historic works, PHotoESPAÑA (6 June-26 August 2018, venues across Madrid, Barcelona and in Valencia), the Museo Lázaro Galdiano in Madrid will open an exhibition Descubriendo a Luis Masson commemorating the work of the French 19th-century photographer Luis Masson (born 1825), who produced a complete topographical photographic study of Spain and was also noted for his photographic reproductions of the works of Murillo. Masson established himself in Seville in 1858 with his wife, Lorenza Simonin, with whom he worked over the next eight years producing a wide range of architectural photographs, some stereoscopic, of Seville and other Andalucian cities and monuments, working in particular for the Duque de Montpensier. In 1866 he moved to Madrid, recording from there the cities of Toledo, Ávila, Valladolid, Salamanca and Burgos, before returning to Seville at the end of the 1870s, where he was last recorded in 1881.The photographs are selected from the private Colección Fernández Rivero de Fotografía Antigua, which owns about 35,000 original photographs ranging from the 1840s through to the early decades of the 20thcentury. It focuses its collections on Spanish images and in particular photographs created in Andalucia, with a special section on Málaga and its province.  The exhibition was previously shown (January-March 2018) at the Centro Andaluz de la Fotografía, Almería. An accompanying monograph by Juan Antonio Fernández Rivero and María Teresa García Ballesteros, Descubriendo a Luis Masson, fotógrafo en la España del XIX which inventories 511 of Masson’s photographs was published by  Ediciones del Genal, Málaga in 2017.

Featured Exhibition: Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, until 22 July 2018

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Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (Mexican, 1713–1772). Portrait of Doña Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas (detail), c. 1762. Galería Coloniart, Collection of Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andrés Siegel, Mexico City. Photo © Rafael Doniz

The vitality and inventiveness of artists in eighteenth-century New Spain (Mexico) is the focus of Pinxit Mexici, an exhibition which presents some 110 works of art (primarily paintings), many of which are unpublished and newly restored. The exhibition surveys the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlights the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. It is the first major exhibition devoted to this neglected topic.

The exhibition is divided in thematic sections: Great Masters; Masters Storytellers and the Art of Expression; Noble Pursuits and the Academy; Paintings of the Land; The Power of Portraiture; The Allegorical World; Imagining the Sacred.

Click here to find out more.

4 months to go! ‘Ribera: Art of Violence’ opens 26 September 2018 at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

ribera-martiri-de-sant-bartomeu-large-bannerThis autumn, Dulwich Picture Gallery will present the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

A scholarly catalogue will accompany the exhibition, showcasing the new research which has informed the display.

Ribera: Art of Violence is co-curated by ARTES committee member Dr Edward Payne (Head Curator of Spanish Art, The Auckland Project), author of a PhD thesis on the theme of violence in Ribera’s art (2012) and contributor to the catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings (2016), and Dr Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection), former Arturo and Holly Melosi Chief Curator at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and curator of the National Gallery’s exhibitions The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700 (2009) and Goya: The Portraits (2015).

Click here for a video presenting the exhibition, and here for a preview article in The Guardian. 

Opens today: Dibujos de Luis Paret (1746-1799) at the Biblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid

paret_cubierta-616x800Luis Paret y Alcázar (Madrid, 1746‒1799) has been hailed as a ‘spontaneous and joyful’ painter who allowed himself to be ‘overly’ influenced by French art. Labelled as the ‘Spanish Watteau’ and the most genuine representative of Rococo painting in the
country, he has long been considered the second most important painter of his day after Goya.

However, these considerations are a direct consequence of a historiographical discourse more concerned with contrasting the two artists than with attributing Paret’s heterodoxy (he was a pupil of La Traverse and court painter to the Infante Don Luis) to his eventful life, his artistic interests and his background.

The above factors provide a backdrop to Dibujos de Luis Paret (1746-1799). Open until 16 September, the exhibition is curated by Alejandro Martínez Pérez, a historian well versed in the Paret’s life and career who sets out to clarify the historiographical lacunae by examining the artist’s main instrument – his drawings – reconstructing his personal library and analysing his relationships with his patrons.

The show – featuring a total of 188 pieces including drawings (84), paintings, prints, books and manuscripts – has been made possible by the collaboration and loans of important private collections and institutions, both Spanish and foreign, such as the Museo Nacional del Prado, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the Real Academia
de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, the Rijksmuseum, the Real Academia Española, the Fundación Lázaro Galdiano and the Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas.

Organised by the BNE and the CEEH, the exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue raisonné of Luis Paret’s drawings, which is set to become a reference work for studies on the artist. Published by CEEH, the catalogue can be purchased here. Until 15 June, our readers can benefit from a 10% discount.