Tag Archives: Fashion

Opens Today: Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving, Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York, until 12 May 2019

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Nickolas Muray (American, born Hungary, 1892–1965). Frida in New York, 1946; printed 2006. Carbon pigment print, image: 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Emily Winthrop Miles Fund, 2010.80. © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s unique and immediately recognizable style was an integral part of her identity. Kahlo came to define herself through her ethnicity, disability, and politics, all of which were at the heart of her work. Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving is the largest U.S. exhibition in ten years devoted to the iconic painter and the first in the United States to display a collection of her clothing and other personal possessions, which were rediscovered and inventoried in 2004 after being locked away since Kahlo’s death, in 1954. They are displayed alongside important paintings, drawings, and photographs from the celebrated Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art, as well as related historical film and ephemera. To highlight the collecting interests of Kahlo and her husband, muralist Diego Rivera, works from the museum’s extensive holdings of Mesoamerican art are also included.

 

Kahlo’s personal artifacts—which range from noteworthy examples of Kahlo’s Tehuana clothing, contemporary and pre-Colonial jewelry, and some of the many hand-painted corsets and prosthetics used by the artist during her lifetime—had been stored in the Casa Azul (Blue House), the longtime Mexico City home of Kahlo and Rivera, who had stipulated that their possessions not be disclosed until 15 years after Rivera’s death. The objects shed new light on how Kahlo crafted her appearance and shaped her personal and public identity to reflect her cultural heritage and political beliefs, while also addressing and incorporating her physical disabilities.

Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving is based on an exhibition at the V&A London curated by Claire Wilcox and Circe Henestrosa, with Gannit Ankori as curatorial advisor. Their continued participation has been essential to presenting the Brooklyn exhibition, which is organized by Catherine Morris, Sackler Senior Curator for the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, and Lisa Small, Senior Curator, European Art, Brooklyn Museum, in collaboration with the Banco de México Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, and The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art and The Vergel Foundation.

Click here for more information

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Opens today: Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up, V&A Museum, London

640Open until 4 November 2018, this exhibition presents an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico. Click here to book tickets and see related events.

 

Closing this week: ‘Sorolla y la moda’, Museo Sorolla and Museo Thyssen Bornemisza Collection, Madrid

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The exhibition Sorolla y la moda closes on 27 May at the Museo Sorolla in Madrid.
Curated by Eloy Martínez de la Pera, it investigates the connections between Sorolla’s painting and fashion between 1890 and the 1920s.

Click here and here to find out more.

Conference: Collecting Spain: Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain, V&A, London, 8th–9th June 2018

V&ASpanish art has been collected in the UK since the 17th century. This conference will explore collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies will be drawn from the V&A and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organized in joint sessions dealing with the same subject from Spanish and then British perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media, while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference will include poster session during the coffee breaks.

Opening remarks on the history of collecting Spanish Decorative Arts by medium: Collecting, Display & Dissemination: the changing face of the decorative arts collection at South Kensington (1852-1873), Dr Susanna Avery-Quash (Senior Research Curator, History of Collecting, National Gallery)

  • Ceramics: Lusterware:
    M. Rosser-Owen (Asian Department, V&A): Collecting Spanish lustreware by the Victoria and Albert MuseumJaume Coll (Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia): A survey and history of collecting Spanish Decorative Arts: Lusterware 
  •  Textiles:
    Ana Cabrera (Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A): Following the thread: collecting Spanish textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum Spanish case

    Silvia Carbonell (Centro de Documentación Museo Textil, Tarrasa): Textile collecting in Catalonia
  • Silver:
    Kirstin Kennedy (Metalwork Department, V&A): The Scholar, the scoundrel and the skater: How the V&A collections of Hispanic silver were formed

    Jesús Rivas (Universidad de Murcia): Collecting Spanish silverwork
  • Furniture:
    Nick Humphrey (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A): Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

    Sofía Rodríguez (Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid): Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid (1880-1920)
  • Sculpture and Plaster Cast:
    Xavier Bray (Wallace Collection): A Vogue for St Francis

    Holly Trusted (Sculpture Department, V&A): Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the profile of Spanish Art through Plaster CastsMaria Bolaños (Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid): Electrical treasuries: the Decorative Arts collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones (1881-1915)

     

  •  Fashion:
    Oriole Cullen (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A): Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

    Helena López del Hierro (Museo del Traje, Madrid): From Dress to Fashion:the collection of The Museo del Traje

  • Displaying, interpreting and conserving collections of Spanish decorative arts:
    Isabel Rodríguez (Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid): Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative AnalysisCorinna Gardner and
    Johanna Agerman Ross (Design, Architecture and Digital, V&A): 20th century Galleries at the V&A

    Lesley Miller (Furniture, Textiles and Fashion, V&A): Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries

    Victor Borges (Conservation Department, V&A): The Conservation of the Cast Courts. New discoveries on the Spanish Casts

  • Closing speaker: Dr Edward Payne (Head Curator: Spanish Art, Auckland Castle): Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland
  • Closing remarks: Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Booking required: click here

Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.

2014-06-Museo del Traje-Madrid España de Moda (Fifty years of Spanish Fashion), Museo del Traje, Madrid, 13 May – 31 August 2014. Exhibition of dress, drawings and posters. Includes interviews with leading Spanish fashion designers from the 1960s onwards, who developed from being producers of luxury goods to adapting to new economic factors in the 1970s and introducing prêt-a-porter garments; to the present position with young designers working for established world-renowned companies.