Tag Archives: Paris

Featured exhibition: Kinesthesia: Latin American Kinetic Art, 1954–1969, Palm Springs Art Museum, until 15 January 2018

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Martha Boto, Déplacements optico-hydrauliques, 1970, Collection of Gérard and Maria Rose Guilbert, Paris. Courtesy of Sicardi Gallery, Houston, © 2017 Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris, Photograph by Logan Sebastian Beck

Kinesthesia: Latin American Kinetic Art, 1954–1969, Palm Springs Art Museum, 26 August 2017 – 15 January, 2018.

This exhibition is the first in-depth examination of the pioneering role played by South American artists in the international Kinetic Art movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Grounded by scholarly research into experimental art movements of the late 1940s and early 1950s in Buenos Aires, Caracas, and Rio de Janeiro.  Kinesthesia  begins its survey with the layered “vibrational” works created by Jesús Rafael Soto for the historic Le Mouvement exhibition at Galerie Denise René in Paris (1955) and goes on to explore more than fifty examples by nine artists, including the works of internationally well-known figures, such as Carlos Cruz-Diez, Gyula Kosice, and Julio Le Parc, alongside the less well known Martha Boto, Horacio García-Rossi, Alejandro Otero, Abraham Palatnik, and Gregorio Vardánega. The exhibition like that at Santa Barbara is part of the Getty Foundation supported Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, an exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.

 

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Featured Exhibition: Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form

mm-70-1000pxPicasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form, Meadows Museum, Dallas, USA, until  5 November

This focused exhibition of paintings is inspired by a work in the Meadows Museum’s collection, Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915). In the early 20th century, Picasso and the Mexican artist Diego Rivera both lived and worked in Paris. Initially friends, in 1915 they fell out because Diego Rivera accused Picasso of plagiarising the foliage from one of his own paintings.

The source of Rivera’s ire was the perceived semblance between his 1915 Zapatista Landscape (The Guerrilla) and Picasso’s Seated Man (1915-16), which in its first iteration – as seen by Rivera in another visit to Picasso’s studio in August 1915 – was known as Man Seated in Shrubbery. Rivera noted acute similarities between his canvas and that of the early state of Picasso’s work; namely, both works featured a similarly structured still life set outdoors. The Mexican artist’s very specific complaint was his former mentor’s liberal borrowing of Rivera’s formulaic foliage – scumbled patches of green and white paint on a dark ground.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form takes as its point of departure another case study of the two artists’ works: Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915) at the Meadows, which will be displayed for the first time with Rivera’s Still Life with Gray Bowl (Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library, Austin), painted in the same year. Exhibited in close proximity, these two paintings together encapsulate the two artists’ overlapping of themes and motif appropriation during that period.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form affords a closer look at the development of Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape in the Meadows collection by presenting it together with its analogue from the Columbus Museum of Art as well as Rivera’s variation on the theme from Austin. The visual dialogue taking place in 1915 between these two giants of modern art will be further outlined through the display of Rivera’s 1915 Still Life with Bread Knife, a second generous loan from the Columbus Museum of Art. Beyond the rich anecdotes regarding the relationship of the two artists, this group of paintings provides an opportunity to find parallels as well as deviations between these canvases. In spite of limited wartime resources, 1914-15 proved to be a fecund era of creativity for both Picasso and Rivera.

Closing soon: Picasso Primitif (Paris)

 

Picasso Primitif

Musée de Quai Branly, Paris

28 March – 23 July 2017

As evidenced by the exhibition’s documents, letters, objects and photographs, Picasso’s personal collection of the arts of Africa, Oceania, the Americas and Asia accompanied him in his moves from one studio to the next. The aim is not to show any eventual influences of primitive art on Picasso, but rather to show the attraction that the arts of Africa, Oceania, the Americas and Asia held for him.

The second, more conceptual part of the exhibition offers a comparative view of the artist’s works with those of non-Western artists. The resulting juxtapositions reveal the similar issues these artists addressed (for example: nudity, sexuality, impulses and loss) through parallel 3-dimensional solutions such as deforming or deconstructing bodies, for example).

Miguel Barceló, Paris

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Miguel Barceló: Sol y Sombra

Musée Picasso, Paris
22 March – 31 July 2016

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
22 March – 28 August 2016

Born in 1957 in Majorca, Barceló is the first contemporary artist invited to present a monographic exhibition at the recently reopened Musée Picasso. Paintings, sculptures, ceramics, and works on paper, from the 1990s to the present day, are on display, highlighting the affinities with Picasso’s work processes and motifs.
The BnF, meanwhile, focuses on Barceló’s prints.

Picasso Sculpture (New York to Paris)

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The exhibition Picasso Sculpture, previously showing some 140 works spanning 1902 to 1964 at MoMA, New York (until 7 February 2016), re-opens, in a reduced form, as Picasso: Scuptures (Musée Picasso, Paris: 8 March – 18 September 2016).
MOMA installation reviewed by Rosalind McKeever, Burlington Magazine, December 2015 pp. 880-82 .

 

Exhibition: Velázquez: Paris

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Exhibition:
Velázquez
Grand Palais
Paris, 25 March – 13 July 2015

The first monographic exhibition in France on the artis, surveying his entire career and his influence on contemporaries.
Organised by the Louvre’s curator of Spanish and Latin American art, Guillaume Kientz, with the support of the Prado and the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

Oscar Muñoz, Paris

2014-06-OscarMunoz_CortinasDeBanoOscar Muñoz: Protographies, Jeu de Paume, Paris, 4 June – 21 September 2014.
Presents works by one of Colombia’s leading contemporary artists (born 1951) including hyper-realist large-scale charcoal drawings created between 1979-81, prints from the 1980s, film and recent ‘images in flux’.
The exhibition has been co-curated by the Jeu de Paume with the Museo de Arte del Banco de la República, Bogotá.