Tag Archives: landscape

Featured Exhibitions: ‘Zuloaga. Character and Emotion’, Centro Cultural Bancaja, Valencia (until 26 August 2018) and ‘Sorolla and Spirituality’ (until 2 September 2018)

ZuloagaZuloaga. Character and Emotion (until 26 August 2018)

This exhibition features some 66 paintings by the Basque artist, several of which are displayed in public for the first time. Ranging in date from 1888, when Zuloaga was 18, to 1945, the works trace the artist’s development from his training in Paris to the mature work inspired by Spanish artists such as Velázquez, Ribera, Zurbarán, Goya and El Greco. The curators, Sofía Barrón y Carlos Alonso, focus on Zuloaga as both a landscapist and a portraitist. They showcase his representations of turn-of-the-century aristocracy, bourgeoisie and intellectuals, as well as his intimate portraits of family members. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue and is organised in collaboration with the Museo Zuloaga in Pedraza (Segovia) and its president, the artist’s granddaughter, María Rosa Suárez Zuloaga.

SorollaSorolla and Spirituality (until 2 September 2018)

This exhibition features the work Yo soy el pan de la vida, exhibited to the public for the first time since its recent restoration, the result of a collaboration with the owners of the work, the Lladró family. Curated by Felipe Garín, the exhibition explores the religious themes which the Valencian artist explored briefly in the earlier part of his career. It comprises six works produced between 1883 y 1899, including ¡Triste herencia!, Monja en oración, Santa ClotildeMesa petitoria, and La Virgen María, all on loan from major public collections.

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Doctoral Studentship for Spanish Architecture at the University of Warwick

zamora_15825The university of Warwick is offering a Doctoral Studentship to a UK/EU candidate, focusing on ‘Petrifying Wealth: Religious buildings in Zamora, 11th-13th Centuries: building processes, forms and functions’

Outline of the project 

The construction of churches or church buildings is obviously as old as the dominance of Christianity in Western societies. The petrification of ecclesiastical wealth, however, implied a more recognisable and enduring presence for this institution throughout the medieval landscape, both urban and rural. The building of churches, and to a lesser extent monasteries, was also promoted by the laity. These were initiatives and investments that were partly religious in origin, in so far as they were ways to ensure the eternal salvation of the founders or of the community involved. The proliferation of masonry-built churches may also raise the question of other objectives of the secular world. Sometimes the laity invested in churches to provide a new, or at least a stronger, more formalised and more recognizable community identity.

Aims and Objectives
The aims and objectives therefore constitute four research strands:

• Contribution to the analysis of the material evidence both on a macro scale and regionally. Census and systematization through a database of churches in the regions selected through a Geographic Information System (GIS).

• Census and chronology of the foundations of family churches, paying particular attention to those endowed by women.

• Estimation of construction costs. Evaluation of aspects related to the production and transport of the materials used, the distance from the quarries of origin, the use of new stone and the reuse of old materials.

• Testing of the hypotheses concerning the functionality and use of the elements of the churches.

Methodology
Fieldwork in Zamora will identify the buildings that will form the focus of the study and these will then be examined archaeologically to determine the materials and the means of construction. Particular attention will focus on the precise recording of masons’ marks and on the compilation of a database of these marks and their locations for each building. These databases will be integrated into the larger database of the whole Petrifying Wealth project.

Outcome
The research will make a substantial contribution to the overall project and will form a discrete section of the database of material relating both to Spain and to the wider context of the project. It will inform further debate on the construction of stone buildings in medieval Europe and the means and methods of construction.

Studentship
The PhD studentship will be based at the CSIC in Madrid, and at the University of Warwick and will be supervised by Dr Therese Martin (CSIC) and Dr Jenny Alexander.

The student will be based in Madrid, have the status of a pre-doctoral fellow at the CSIC and will be expected to participate in CSIC activities. Although English is widely used at the CSIC, working knowledge of Spanish will be needed. Supervisions, by Skype and in person, will be at Warwick.

Applications are welcome from Students from the UK and the EU.

The studentship will cover home/EU fees (full time) and a stipend for UK students or EU students of 22,350 euros, rising to 27,000 euros per annum for three years.

Candidates ideally should have a First Class Honours degree in History of Art or a related discipline and a distinction-level Masters degree in History of Art or a related discipline.

Applications should include a statement of not more than 1,000 words indicating what skills and experience they will bring to the project, a current CV, a transcript of qualifications to date (and anticipated results if you are still studying for your MA), two letters of recommendation plus a writing sample (either a full essay or MA dissertation).

The deadline for applications is March 31st 2018 with interviews to be held in April 2018.

Applications should be made via the University of Warwick online application form.

Please make clear in your online application that you are applying for the Petrifying Wealth studentship.

If you wish to discuss the project in more details please email jennifer.alexander@warwick.ac.uk

Training and Support
Training needs will be assessed immediately after appointment as the level and type of training required will depend on the focus of the research proposal and the skills that the student brings to the discipline.

The student will also be able to participate in workshops offered by Warwick’s Centre for Advanced Doctoral Research Excellence (CADRE) and courses in information technology provided by Warwick’s IT services.

At the beginning of year 2 and 3 a review of training needs will be undertaken by the supervisors, and the regular supervision meetings will monitor this and identify any additional requirements.

Dissemination Plans
The research findings will be disseminated via a 80,000 word doctoral thesis, conference papers, and future publications such as articles, to be submitted beyond the completion date of the project. The results will be incorporated in the Petrifying Wealth database as part of a continuing research resource.

News: Meadows Museum acquires last painting by Spanish master Mariano Fortuny y Marsal

 

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish, 1838–1874), Beach at Portici, 1874. Oil on canvas, 27 x 51 ¼ in. (68.6 x 130.2 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas.

Beach at Portici by Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838- 1874)
Oil on canvas, 27 x 51 ¼ in. (68.6 x 130.2 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas.

The Southern Methodist University’s Website announced today that The Meadows Museum has acquired Beach at Portici, the last painting of famed Spanish artist Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838-1874).

This large-scale, unfinished work depicts the carefree atmosphere of a bbeautiful summer day at the beach, demonstrating Fortuny’s hallmark ability to capture light in paint.

Fortuny was an especially popular artist with 19th-century American collectors and audiences, as revealed by the American provenance of this work. Indeed, it was featured prominently in the American Pavilion’s “Loan Collection of Foreign Masterpieces Owned in the United States” at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, one of the most important international exhibitions of the 19th century.

Beach at Portici will be on view at the Meadows Museum beginning January 19, 2018. From June 24 through September 23, it will be the subject of a focused exhibition, At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase. 

 

Featured Exhibition: Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form

mm-70-1000pxPicasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form, Meadows Museum, Dallas, USA, until  5 November

This focused exhibition of paintings is inspired by a work in the Meadows Museum’s collection, Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915). In the early 20th century, Picasso and the Mexican artist Diego Rivera both lived and worked in Paris. Initially friends, in 1915 they fell out because Diego Rivera accused Picasso of plagiarising the foliage from one of his own paintings.

The source of Rivera’s ire was the perceived semblance between his 1915 Zapatista Landscape (The Guerrilla) and Picasso’s Seated Man (1915-16), which in its first iteration – as seen by Rivera in another visit to Picasso’s studio in August 1915 – was known as Man Seated in Shrubbery. Rivera noted acute similarities between his canvas and that of the early state of Picasso’s work; namely, both works featured a similarly structured still life set outdoors. The Mexican artist’s very specific complaint was his former mentor’s liberal borrowing of Rivera’s formulaic foliage – scumbled patches of green and white paint on a dark ground.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form takes as its point of departure another case study of the two artists’ works: Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915) at the Meadows, which will be displayed for the first time with Rivera’s Still Life with Gray Bowl (Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library, Austin), painted in the same year. Exhibited in close proximity, these two paintings together encapsulate the two artists’ overlapping of themes and motif appropriation during that period.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form affords a closer look at the development of Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape in the Meadows collection by presenting it together with its analogue from the Columbus Museum of Art as well as Rivera’s variation on the theme from Austin. The visual dialogue taking place in 1915 between these two giants of modern art will be further outlined through the display of Rivera’s 1915 Still Life with Bread Knife, a second generous loan from the Columbus Museum of Art. Beyond the rich anecdotes regarding the relationship of the two artists, this group of paintings provides an opportunity to find parallels as well as deviations between these canvases. In spite of limited wartime resources, 1914-15 proved to be a fecund era of creativity for both Picasso and Rivera.

Velázquez at Kingston Lacy: Lecture by Dr Gabriele Finaldi, 21 July

Philip IV hunting Wild Boar (La Tela Real)
Diego Velázquez, Philip IV hunting Wild Boar (La Tela Real), probably 1632-7, oil on canvas, 182 x 302 cm. The National Gallery, London, inventory no. NG197

A unique landscape by artist Diego Velázquez, painted for King Philip IV of Spain, is on loan from the National Gallery in London for the first time, and is exhibited at the National Trust’s Kingston Lacy in Dorset.
La Tela Real takes pride of place in the dining room, while Kingston Lacy’s The Judgement of Solomon by Sebastiano del Piombo is on loan to the National Gallery, where it joined a major exhibition charting Sebastiano’s extraordinary friendship with Michelangelo, master of the Italian High Renaissance.

La Tela Real is a landscape scene depicting a type of boar hunt, staged by the Spanish kings on feast days and to honour special guests. The quarry was hunted within a canvas (tela) enclosure (so giving the name La Tela Real, i.e. ‘The Royal Enclosure’). Owing to the tremendous expense and labour involved, only the king could afford such a spectacle.
Identifiable figures include Philip IV, in the right mid-ground, meeting the charge of the boar. Immediately to his left is the powerful Count-Duke of Olivares (first minister to the king) and beyond him most likely the Infante Don Carlos, Philip’s brother. The king’s first wife, Isabella of Bourbon, watches the events from the comfort and safety of one of the carriages inside the enclosure.

La Tela Real is exceptional amongst Velázquez’s body of work. An extremely rare and individual landscape, it was designed around 1636-8 for The Torre de la Parada, Philip IV’s hunting lodge near Madrid. At Kingston Lacey it will be possible to enjoy an intimate encounter with this artwork, similar to that enjoyed by the king and his court in its original private, royal setting.

Moreover, it will be possible to enjoy the painting together with Kingston Lacy’s remarkable collection of Spanish paintings, assembled by William John Bankes and proudly displayed in his opulent ‘Spanish Room’. The finest works include Velázquez’s portrait of Cardinal Camillo Massimi, and a near-contemporary copy of the artist’s Las Meninas, one of the most enigmatic and famous images in the history of Western art.

To reveal the story of La Tela Real and the fascinating associations with Kingston Lacy’s own outstanding collections, Dr Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery,  will give a lecture  looking at Velázquez as an artist along with the history surrounding Philip IV of Spain and the art of boar hunting.

The lecture will take place on 21 July. Tickets are £12 per person, with a welcome drink from 6.30pm, time to explore the state rooms at Kingston Lacy, before the lectures start at 7pm.

Tickets must be booked in advance on 0344 249 1895 or online.
Visitors can see La Tela Real on display until September. The house at Kingston Lacy opens via a timed ticket system. Tickets can be booked online.