Tag Archives: america

Online Resources from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and MoMA

Since 2016, MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum have worked on digitising exhibition catalogues and other material related to their displays and collections.

MoMA’s ‘Exhibition History‘ page offers access to photographs, interpretation, checklists and other material for 4,918 exhibitions from the museum’s founding in 1929 to the present. ARTES members may be particularly interested to discover a 1931 exhibition dedicated to Diego Rivera, the show American Sources of Modern Art (Aztec, Mayan, Incan) of 1933, the ground-breaking Cubism and Abstract Art of 1936, the 1939 show Picasso: Forty years of his art and exhibitions dedicated to the Brazilian artist Candido Portinari and to Joan Miró in 1940. The archive offers a way to explore the museum’s history during its closure for refurbishment and redisplay (re-opens October 21).

On archive.org, art lovers and researchers can read and download more than 200 catalogues published by the Guggenheim Museum. Highlights include the exhibition Tauromaquia (Collezione Peggy Guggenheim, Venice, 1985), Berriaren tradizioa: Guggenheim bildumako maisulanak, 1945–1990 (Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao, 1995), and The Aztec Empire (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2004).

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Specialist Workshop: “Golden Age Art and Globalization in Madrid’s Museums”, Madrid, Spain, September 2–12, 2019

Specialist Workshop “Golden Age Art and Globalization in Madrid’s Museums”
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, September 2–12 2019
Deadline for applications: Jun 2, 2019

Many of the objects that are admired today in Spain’s major museums arrived here in the Early Modern period. Collections of art,  
artifacts, and objects—everythig from paintings and sculptures to armor, textiles, feathers, books, exotic shells and even animal horns transmitted a variety of meanings, many of which are lost to the average museum visitor today.

Understanding these objects (their origins, how they arrived and how they were seen) introduces students to a deeper appreciation of how Spanish history and identity has been and is created in relationship with the rest of the world, and especially with Spanish-speaking  America and Asia.  The course will explore these issues using ten selected objects that will provide a view of early globalization focusing on questions raised by the objects themselves.  One of the topics to analyze will be the relationship of art to diplomacy, seeking to shed light on the value of paintings of distant places, peoples and animals as “proof” or “document” in the age before photography, or the place of “the others” (non-Europeans) in the history of Spanish and European societies in general, both in the past and in today’s globalized and multicultural world.  Attention will also be paid to questions such as commerce, consumption, religion, and  gender in a world of travelling objects and persons, always with an emphasis on elucidating how these travels created new meanings for objects in new contexts.

This course has a practical, object-based character, with practically all of the sessions taking place in museums, libraries and other collections in Madrid and its surroundings.  Presentations and discussions will take place in fromt of the objects themselves.  This experience will help students to work with objects and to be aware of the material aspects of globalization, further from what is expressed in academic texts and articles. It is expected too that all will feel  something of the fascination and intrigue experienced by contemporaries who saw these things for the first time.

For further details and inscriptions:  
http://formacioncontinua.uam.es/33421/detail/golden-age-art-and-globalization-in-madrids-museums.html

For enquiries, please contact:
mcruz.decarlos@uam.es / elena.alcala@uam.es / isabel.cervera@uam.es

Featured exhibition: ‘La hija del Virrey. El mundo femenino novohispano en el siglo XVII’, Museo de América, Madrid, until 3 March

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Curated by Andrés Gutiérrez Usillos, this exhibition focuses on an anonymous portrait of c. 1670. The work represents Doña María Luisa de Toledo, daughter of the Marquis of Mancera, Viceroy of New Spain, accompanied by a tattooed Indigenous woman. The show explores the world of the women portrayed in the painting, for example by reconstructing Doña María Luisa de Toledo’s trousseau, composed mainly of American and Asian items acquired in Mexico. The presentation thus analyses the clashes and encounters among the different worlds which coexisted in Viceregal America from a rare female perspective.

 Click here for more information, and here for an exhibition brochure.

Featured Exhibition: Roma en México/México en Roma: las academias de arte entre Europa y el Nuevo Mundo (1843–1867), Museo Nacional de San Carlos, Mexico City, until April 28, 2019

cop_0174The exhibition Roma en México/México en Roma: las academias de arte entre Europa y el Nuevo Mundo (1843–1867) presents the academic and artistic exchange between Italy and Mexico through 93 nineteenth-century works. It focuses on the relations between the Accademia de San Luca and the Academia de San Carlos, and presents the results of an extensive research project by Professor Stefano Cracolici, Director of the Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art at Durham University, and Professor Giovanna Capitelli, of the Università della Calabria in Italy.

Roma en México/México en Roma is divided in eight sections: La fábrica del prestigio discusses Rome’s legitimising power; Obras de viaje is dedicated to the import of exemplary paintings and sculptures from Rome to Mexico; Dramatis personae presents the portrait as the most sought-after genre in the period; Virtud de los clásicos focuses on the importance of Greek and Latin literature in inspiring iconographies; La riqueza del pueblo is a display of works after the live model; La escuela del paisaje includes landscapes by the Hungarian painter Károly Markó El Viejo, among others; La internacional del arte sacro contains religious paintings by students of the Academia de San Carlos; El espectáculo de la historia concludes the exhibition with major historical works.

The show foregrounds works by Mexican artists, from the lesser-known Tomás Pérez, Primitivo Miranda, Tiburcio Sánchez and Epitacio Calvo, to better-known personalities such as Juan Cordero. Francesco Coghetti, Francesco Podesti and Giovanni Silvagni are examples of Roman painters whose works arrived in Mexico and were used to illustrate the art of painting to students of the Academia.

A major publication by Campisano Editore accompanies the exhibition, acting as both an exhibition catalogue and a scholarly introduction to this under-researched topic.

 

CFP: Sacred Images in the Iberian Americas until 1700: Processes, Strategies and Agents, Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March 2019

1024px-our_lady_of_guadalupeSACRED IMAGES IN THE IBERIAN AMERICAS UNTIL 1700: PROCESSES, STRATEGIES AND AGENTS

This panel proposes an approach to the phenomenon of sacred images through three main elements: processes, strategies and agents. The mark of the sacred and the miraculous was achieved by different procedures: hierophanies, thaumaturgy, paranormal phenomena (sweating, weeping, mobility). Definitely, the agency of the sculpture or the painting of religious images blossomed in the Iberian Americas, in need of tradition and sacralization.
Texts about the inventio, the hierophany and other manifestations of the image relate the processes of creation and the evolution of these images until marked by the sacred. In most cases, they follow patterns, repeated to the point of being able to establish a rhetoric of the sacred image. In many cases, these stories, regardless of their historical veracity, provide us valuable information about the strategies devised by the agents. Empowered by their sacred image, these agents (religious orders, patrons…) are in a position to get economic benefits (charity, exemptions), political ones (preferential treatment), and they can build an identity at various levels (territorial, ethnic, political…). The huge amount of textual and visual sources allows to deal with case studies in order to understand the crucial role of the image, through the sacred, in the Ibero-American space of this time.
We invite submissions of proposals for 20 minutes presentations that explore case-studies or some of the many aforementioned aspects of sacred images in the Iberian Americas (also Iberian Asia can be considered) between 16th and 17th century.
Please submit abstracts (200 words maximum), along with a title and a CV (300 word maximum including full name, current affiliation and email address) to Escardiel González (escardielge@gmail.com) and Daniel Expósito Sánchez (daniel.exposito@upr.edu) by August 10, 2018.

More information in: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696697/Art-History-CfPs-for-RSA-2019-Toronto

News: Meadows Museum acquires last painting by Spanish master Mariano Fortuny y Marsal

 

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish, 1838–1874), Beach at Portici, 1874. Oil on canvas, 27 x 51 ¼ in. (68.6 x 130.2 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas.

Beach at Portici by Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838- 1874)
Oil on canvas, 27 x 51 ¼ in. (68.6 x 130.2 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas.

The Southern Methodist University’s Website announced today that The Meadows Museum has acquired Beach at Portici, the last painting of famed Spanish artist Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838-1874).

This large-scale, unfinished work depicts the carefree atmosphere of a bbeautiful summer day at the beach, demonstrating Fortuny’s hallmark ability to capture light in paint.

Fortuny was an especially popular artist with 19th-century American collectors and audiences, as revealed by the American provenance of this work. Indeed, it was featured prominently in the American Pavilion’s “Loan Collection of Foreign Masterpieces Owned in the United States” at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, one of the most important international exhibitions of the 19th century.

Beach at Portici will be on view at the Meadows Museum beginning January 19, 2018. From June 24 through September 23, it will be the subject of a focused exhibition, At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase. 

 

New Publication: El Greco comes to America: the Discovery of a Modern Old Master (CEEH, Center for Spain in America and Frick Collection, 2017)

greco-666x800El Greco comes to America: The Discovery of a Modern Old Master, directed by Inge Reist and José Luis Colomer
Este libro es un homenaje a los soberbios ejemplos de la obra del Greco
conservados en Estados Unidos. El estilo tan personal del artista tenía
un aire de modernidad que atraía a los coleccionistas de aquel país,
gracias a lo cual los museos americanos poseen muchos de los mejores
Grecos que hay fuera de España. Once especialistas abordan el estudio
de coleccionistas particulares como Arabella Huntington, Louisine
Havemeyer, Henry Clay Frick, Peter Widener y Duncan Phillips, pero
analizan también el impacto de las exposiciones en las que pudieron
verse obras del cretense y el papel que desempeñaron artistas-asesores
como Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent y Roger Fry.

Partiendo de una rica documentación de archivo, en gran parte inédita
hasta ahora, los autores de este volumen demuestran el denuedo con el
que los coleccionistas americanos compitieron por las obras del Greco y
el lugar tan destacado que concedieron en sus casas a los cuadros del
cretense, que a menudo colgaron junto a otros de pintores más modernos
como Degas o Manet. Al hacerlo, y al fomentar la compra de cuadros del
Greco por parte de las instituciones públicas que financiaban, forjaron
la reputación internacional de este artista entre el público
contemporáneo, garantizando un aprecio por su estilo único que se
mantiene todavía.

SOBRE LOS DIRECTORES [10]

INGE REIST, doctora por la Universidad de Columbia, donde dio clase
durante unos años, es directora del Center for the History of
Collecting de la Frick Art Reference Library. Dirigió también el
Archivo Fotográfico de la Frick Collection y fue presidenta de la
Association of Research Institutes in Art History. Es experta en
historia del coleccionismo, tema sobre el que ha publicado trabajos y
dado conferencias en numerosos museos y congresos. Ha coeditado con Gail
Feigenbaum _Provenance: An Alternative Art History_ (2012), aunque sigue
interesándose por otras cuestiones, como prueba su «_All the World’s a
Stage: The Theater Conceit in Early Modern Italy_» para el Blackwell
Companion to Renaissance and Baroque Art (2012).

JOSÉ LUIS COLOMER es doctor en Literatura Comparada por la Universidad
de Bolonia y licenciado en Historia del Arte por la Sorbona. Actualmente
dirige el Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica y el Center for Spain in
America. Sus investigaciones abordan las relaciones culturales entre
España e Italia en el siglo XVII a través de agentes diplomáticos y
del intercambio de regalos artísticos entre las cortes europeas y los
reyes de España, así como el segundo viaje a Roma de Velázquez y sus
vínculos con personajes italianos en la corte de Madrid. En 2012
codirigió con Inge Reist el libro Collecting Spanish Art: Spain’s
Golden Age and America’s Gilded Age.

264 páginas; 156 ilustraciones
ISBN: 978-84-15245-73-5
50 €
Until 15 December, 10% online discount, http://www.ceeh.es