Tag Archives: Renaissance Society of America

CfP: The Matter of Sculpture in Southern Italy, Spain and the New World

El Greco: St Francis Kneeling in Meditation (Art Institute of Chicago)

El Greco: St Francis Kneeling in Meditation (Art Institute of Chicago)

Renaissance Society of America (RSA) 2017 Conference
Chicago, 30 March – 1 April 2017

Call for Papers:
The Matter of Sculpture in Southern Italy, Spain and the New World

The history of sculpture has, particularly with regard to the early modern period, been dominated by studies on marble and bronze, materials that are at the core of traditional art literature. Yet, as Michael Baxandall has shown in his Limewood Sculptors of Renaissance Germany, different materials might be related to different geographies and very different discourses. This session aims to explore the material richness of early modern sculpture, focusing in particular on the axis between the Kingdom of Naples, Sicily, Spain and the New World. More specifically, we are interested in the ways in which different materials might tell different stories about artistic developments, patronage, artists and local traditions, uncover different sources, and create new connections between various geographical areas. The wooden sculptures of Spain are a well-known example; one may also think, among others, of Sicilian wax sculptures, the silver sculptures of Naples, Lecce’s sculptures in the local pietra leccese, or the cornstalk-paste sculptures of Latin America.

Please send proposals to Johannes Röll (roell@biblhertz.it) and Joris van Gastel (gastel@biblhertz.it) by Sunday, 5 June 2016.

As per RSA guidelines, proposals must include the following: paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum).

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CFP: Art and Experience in 15th Century Naples: Renaissance Society of America, Boston 2016

62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America
Boston, 31 March–2 April 2016
Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center

2015-05-Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

Call for Papers: Art and Experience in 15th Century Naples: Defining an Artistic Center
(Deadline: May 31, 2015)
This panel investigates critical questions surrounding the study of fifteenth-century Neapolitan art. We invite papers that explore questions as fundamental as:

  • What is Neapolitan art?
  • Who were the predominant artists and patrons of the period?
  • What were the social and political functions of art in Quattrocento Naples and in what respect did they differ from those of other centers?
  • What was the relationship between court and city in the Aragonese period and what relevance did it have for the production of art?
  • Was there a conception of “napolitanità” in the fifteenth century, and if so, can it be linked to distinctive artistic styles, forms and types?

More specifically:

  • How did artists working in Naples handle the importation of foreign models, and which visual elements were adapted, translated, or dismissed during this process?
  • In what ways did Neapolitan art and artists participate in global networks of artistic exchange, and how did these trans-regional interactions impact material culture at home and abroad?
  • In what way does Naples challenge traditional art historical concepts and narratives such as “school” or “Renaissance”?

By 31 May please submit a paper title, 150-word abstract (preferably including an image), keywords, and a 300-word curriculum vitae to both organizers, Nicole Riesenberger (nriesenb@umd.edu) and Adrian Bremenkamp (adrian19@zedat.fu-berlin.de).

 

CFP: Framing the Renaissance in the 21st Century: Renaissance Society of America, Boston 2016

62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America
Boston, 31 March–2 April 2016
Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center

2015-05-Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

Call for Papers: Framing the Renaissance in the 21st Century
(Deadline: June 5, 2015)
Claire Farago’s 1995 edited volume, Reframing the Renaissance, has had a tremendous impact on the field of early modern art history. On the 21st anniversary of its publication, we invite scholars to reflect on its role in transforming the way we approach the visual cultures of the early modern world. We are interested in papers that address the ways Reframing has helped precipitate broader historiographical, geographical, and pedagogical reformulations of the “Global Renaissance” and contemporaneous visual cultures. What challenges do we still face in writing histories of art produced within the contexts of exploration, conquest, colonialism, and imperialism? How can we enhance our methodologies to approach art historical phenomena beyond the inhibiting geopolitical constructs of nation states, or even continents? If the Renaissance was “Reframed” in 1995, which qualifier would we use in 2016: Globalized? Decentered? Decolonized? We invite scholars from different generations and subdisciplines to offer insights on the ways that Reframing the Renaissance has changed the field as we know it and to expand its applicability to new scholarly arenas.

Please send a 150-word abstract and a 300-word CV to Eloise Quiñones Keber (equinones213@gmail.com) and Ananda Cohen Suarez (aic42@cornell.edu) by June 5, 2015.

 

CFP: Beyond the Wanderjahr: Microhistories of artistic travel in Renaissance Europe: Renaissance Society of America, Boston 2016

62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America
Boston, 31 March–2 April 2016
Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center

2015-05-Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

CFP: Beyond the Wanderjahr: Microhistories of artistic travel in Renaissance Europe
(Deadline: June 6, 2015)
Recent scholarship has emphasized the extent to which works of art circulated in fifteenth- and early-sixteenth-century Europe, but the movements of individual artists, less tangible and less easily categorized as an aggregate whole, bear witness to exchange and dialogue at a more localized level. Beyond the famous examples of individual travellers crossing the Alps (Fouquet, Dürer, Gossaert, Van Heemskerck), many lesser-known cases of peripatetic displacement occurred, motivated by a variety of concerns beyond the nebulous desire to explore new areas for proto-touristic or proto-art-historical reasons. The diplomatic excursions of Jan van Eyck to Portugal and Gentile Bellini to Istanbul are well-known, but how do the seemingly erratic circulations of Michel Sittow (from Tallinn to Flanders to Denmark to Toledo), Aristotile Fioravanti (from Bologna to Moscow) or Nicolò Brancaleon (from Venice to Ethiopia) confirm or challenge received notions of center versus periphery, heartland versus hinterland? Furthermore, how can physical evidence of artistic travel by anonymous craftsmen (masons, sculptors, weavers, armorers) be addressed by a discipline still deeply inflected by its commitment to Grand Tour geopolitics and the North/South divide? How did artists themselves perceive geographical and political boundaries, and how can lesser-known instances of individual travel across broader geographic distances be appreciated both as unique events and as indices of wider concerns? Returning to the individual narrative, this session seeks to “ask large questions in small places” by examining the lived realities of artists’ journeys in Renaissance Europe.

Please submit proposals electronically to Nicholas Herman (nicholas.herman@umontreal.ca) and Susie Nash (susie.nash@courtauld.ac.uk) by June 6th, 2015.

Proposals should include the paper title, a short abstract (150 word maximum), and a brief curriculum vitae (300 word maximum).

 

CFP: Early Modern Hybridity and Globalization: Artistic and Architectural Exchange in the Iberian World

2014-05-RSA-Berlin-2015CFP: Early Modern Hybridity and Globalization: Artistic and Architectural Exchange in the Iberian World,  Renaissance Society of America conference, Berlin 2015
Scholarship has accepted “hybridity” as a term referring to cultural cross-fertilization in the early modern globalized society. This panel will examine ideas of exchange in artistic and architectural design in the Iberian world of the period. We will explore Spain and Portugal and their wider imperial dominions as points for cultural exchange. We welcome proposals that explore the impact of cultural encounters on art and architecture. We seek papers that examine Iberian encounters in Europe, including the Peninsula itself, as well as those in the wider world, from the South-East Asia to the Americas. We are particularly interested in research that deals with the way in which communities  – artists, patrons, collectors and audiences – negotiated global/transoceanic trends and symbols of local identity in the production of art and architecture. Papers will explore artistic and architectural design that embodies hybridity, rather than for example collections of exotica.
Please send your proposals, an abstract of no more than 150 words, and a short CV, no longer than one side of an A4 sheet of paper, to the co-chairs, Laura Fernández-González, University of Edinburgh (laura.fernandez-gonzalez@ed.ac.uk / laura.fernandezgonzalez@gmail.com), and Marjorie Trusted, Victoria & Albert Museum (m.trusted@vam.ac.uk) before 2 June 2014.
Link:
http://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1134779/187566/Early-Modern-Hybridity-and-Globalization-Artistic-and-Architectural-Exchange-in-the-Iberian-World