Category Archives: News

Three new acquisitions on show at the Prado Museum

Three important new acquisitions are temporarily on display at the Prado Museum in Madrid:

Saint John the Baptist in a Landscape, an oil on copper by Juan Bautista Maíno (1581–1649), strongly influenced by the artist’s Roman period.

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The copper plate for a print portraying an auto da fé in Madrid’s Plaza Mayor, engraved by in 1680 by Flemish artist Gregorio Fosman, one of the outstanding printmakers of the seventeenth century. The print is related to Francisco Rizi’s famous painting of the same subject, also in the Prado.

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Luis Paret’s A celestina [procuress] and the lovers, a work of 1784, inspired by the famous play La Celestina by Francisco de Rojas (1499), which foreshadows the satire of interpersonal relationships characteristic of Goya’s Caprichos 12129_1

 

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News: the National Gallery acquires a still life by Juan de Zurbarán

n-6669_432pxThe National Gallery, London, has recently acquired Still Life with Lemons, Lilies, Carnations, Roses and a Lemon Blossom in a Wicker Basket, the first work by Juan de Zurbarán to enter a public collection in the UK. On display at the Gallery since 25 April 2018, the work was painted in about 1643–49 by the son of leading Golden Age artist Francisco de Zurbarán. Long overshadowed by his father, Juan was a skilled still life painter documented in Seville between 1620 and 1649. Works by his hand are extremely rare as his career was cut short at 29 by the plague which halved the city’s population.

 

Marvel or monster? Madrid’s Torres Colón to become protected architectural heritage

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El País reports that the Colón Towers, two high-rise buildings in the vicinity of Madrid’s Plaza de Colón and Biblioteca Nacional, may soon become listed. Designed by Antonio Lamela (December 1, 1926–April 1, 2017), the towers’ suspended structure was innovative at the time of their construction, between 1967 and 1976. In the 1990s new fire regulations resulted in the construction of an art nouveau roof, known as ‘el enchufe’ (‘the plug’), which links the towers and provides access to an emergency staircase.  

According to the Asociación para la Protección de las Torres Colón, which is campaigning for the recognition of the towers’ architectural importance, ‘su valor arquitectónico, del que su sistema estructural es parte indiscutible y esencial, además de su proyección nacional e internacional, merece ser reconocido como parte del patrimonio arquitectónico madrileño.’

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Opens today: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern, London

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Pablo Picasso The Dream (Le Rêve) 1932, Private Collection © Succession Picasso/DACS, London 2017

Co-organised by Tate Modern and the Musée Picasso, Paris, the exhibition Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern chronicles an intensely creative year in the life of this artist. Focusing on representing his lover Marie-Thérèse Walter, he produced some of his most innovative compositions.
Surprisingly, this will be the Tate’s first ever solo exhibition dedicated to Picasso. Featuring paintings, drawings, and archive documents, the exhibition will reveal the man behind the myth, allowing visitors to discover the full complexity of this famous artist and of his exceptional life.

Picasso portrait to lead Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale, 28 February 2018

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Pablo Picasso, Femme au béret et à la robe quadrillée (marie-Thérèse Walter), 1937 © SUCCESSION PICASSO/DACS 2018. 

Pablo Picasso’s Femme au béret et à la robe quadrillée (Marie-Thérèse Walter) (1937) will be the star of Sotheby’s evening sale tomorrow. It is one of Picasso’s last paintings of his muse Marie-Thérèse Walter, whom he represented countless times in the 1930s. Several paintings of Marie-Thérèse will feature in the exhibition Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy, opening on 8 March 2018 at Tate Modern, London. While works in the exhibition chronicle the romantic highpoint of their relationship, the painting auctioned by Sotheby’s marks its end. Indeed, the dark shadow surrounding Marie-Thérèse’s face may evoke Picasso’s growing passion for Dora Maar, his lover between 1935 and 1943.

 

 

Art historian, philanthropist and ARTES member William Jordan has died at 77

The Dallas News reports that internationally recognised art historian William B. Jordan died Monday in Dallas after a short illness.

After obtaining a Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts in New York, he helped Mr. Algur Meadows form a new collection of Spanish paintings for Southern Methodist University. Later on, he was curator at the Dallas Museum of Art, Kimbell Art Museum and, eventually, a trustee of the Nasher Sculpture Center and the DMA.

In 1986, Dianne Goode and Dr. Bill Jordan are seen in this Fete Set photo.(Joe Laird /Staff Photographer)

In 1986, Dianne Goode and Dr. Bill Jordan are seen in this Fete Set photo.
(Joe Laird /Staff Photographer)

Jordan was known for his unerring eye and outstanding ability to identify potential acquisitions and new masterpieces. Perhaps his crowning achievement was the discovery and subsequent personal gift to the Prado Museum in Madrid of the Portrait of Philip III by the greatest Spanish painter of the Golden Age, Diego Velázquez. Jordan donated the work (estimated at $6 million) to the Prado on Dec. 17, 2016 and was consequently made a trustee of the most significant museum of Spanish art in the world.

Casa Vicens, a home designed by Gaudí, now open to the public in Barcelona

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© Casa Vicens, Barcelona 2016. Photo: Pol Viladoms

The first home designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí has recently opened to the public. Built between 1883 and 1885 as a summer house for the Vicens family, it is a masterpiece of riotous colour in an eclectic neo-moorish style. After over a century of transformations at the hands of various different owners, the World Heritage Site has been returned to its original disposition, while an addition constructed in 1925 has been transformed into a museum. Located in the Gràcia district and surrounded by a verdant garden, the house is open everyday, from 10 am to 8 pm.

Carrer de les Carolines, 20, 08012 Barcelona, Spain
Open daily from 10 am to 8 pm except 25 December, 1 and 6 January