Tag Archives: early modern

Introducing the Maius Workshop

Morgan Beatus Angel Sun Rev 19The Maius Workshop is an interdisciplinary group that brings together graduate students and early career scholars dealing with Hispanic art (broadly considered to include literature, theatre, music, etc.) and history from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period. The aim of the Maius Workshop is to encourage dialogue among specialists in different stages of their academic life and to provide a forum for discussing methods of information gathering and research news. The group is kindly supported by ARTES.

The workshop is named after the tenth-century painter of the Morgan Beatus manuscript as it wishes to create an interdisciplinary space where scholars of art and history can interact. Through a series of reading group meetings, the Workshop aims to bring together young researchers tackling the study of Hispanic culture and history and to create a strong network of specialists of Medieval and Early Modern Iberia and Latin America.

Thanks to the new connections that the group will create, the meetings will develop current research rather than present finished projects. The group’s activities are directed to the diffusion of the interest in Iberian and Latin American cultural creations, with the long-term aim of establishing a permanent community open to all students of Hispanic art and history.

The Maius Workshop’s first meeting will take place on Monday 16 October at 6 pm at the Warburg Institute. This will be an informal meeting and an opportunity to meet postgraduate researchers with similar interests, to discuss how these interests can be drawn together in a reading group setting. The meeting is open to MA, PhD and early career researchers. Refreshments will be provided.

If you are interested in the activities of this research group or would like to attend the meeting, please fill in this form

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Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.

Conference: Visual culture and women’s political identity in the early modern Iberian world II

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Diego Velázquez, Queen Isabel of Bourbon, 1634-35, Oil on canvas, 301 x 314 cm, Museo del Prado, Madrid. Source: Web Gallery of Art

Conference: Visual culture and women’s political identity in the early modern Iberian world II, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies at the University of Nottingham, 21-22 September 2017


Following the opening conference devoted to this theme, held at CHAM, in November 2016, this second conference brings together an international group of researchers from a range of scholarly perspectives to explore, discuss and debate a series of case studies on the visual construction and projection of women’s political identity in medieval and early modern Spain and Portugal. The papers explore a number of critical perspectives that range from the portrayal of Queens and their household to the discourse on female piety and spirituality, both in the court and beyond to lower social strata. The role of women’s agency within the structures of patriarchal society and discourse that underscored much of visual culture is addressed in a number of insightful ways. Furthermore, the range of papers engages with prescient methodological issues facing the study of the visual dimensions of female political identity.

In addition this conference is pleased to announce a plenary lecture by Juliet Perkins, King’s College London.

Programme
Thursday 21st September

9:15 Welcome
9:30-11:00 Session 1) Iconographies of authority 
Chair: Jean Andrews
María Morrás, Departament d’Humanitats, Universitat Pompeu Fabra
La iconografía mariana en la Corona de Aragón y la orden de la Jarra

Inmaculada Rodríguez Moya, Universitat Jaume I
Reinas Fuertes: Poder, Religión Y Familia En La Representación De Las Mujeres Habsburgo

11:00-11:30 Coffee

11:30 – 1:00 Session 2) Religious identity in word and image
Chair: Jeremy Roe

Jean Andrews, University of Nottingham
Josefa in Óbidos: painting under the sign of Luisa de Guzmán 

Joana Serrado, University of Oxford
Six characters in search of a Canon: Saintliness as Feminist Subjectivity in the Early Modern Portuguese Empire

Lunch 1:00-2:00

2:00 – 4:00 Session 3) Iberian Queens and their courts
Chair: Carla Alferes Pinto, Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Laura Oliván, Universidad de Granada
Dresses, Portraits and Spaces: Female Identities at the Alcázar (1621-1665)

Mercedes Llorente, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
The portrayal of two Iberian Queens: Luisa Gusmão and Mariana of Austria

Susana Varela Flor, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Catherine of Braganza: the iconographic strategies of a Catholic Queen in a Protestant Kingdom (1662-1693)

4:00-4:30 Tea

4:30 Plenary Lecture

Juliet Perkins, King’s College London
Guilherme Debrie’s engravings for Theatro Comico Portuguez

Friday 22nd September

9:30-11:00 Session 4) The Queen’s household
Chair: Jeremy Lawrance

Vanessa de Cruz Medina, Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Objects and Agency: Visual Culture and the Political Identity of Ladies-in-Waiting to the Habsburg Courts

Jeremy Roe, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Luisa de Gusmão and the staging of political identity 

11:00- 11:30 Coffee

11:30-1:00 Session 5) Discussion
Concluding address: Jeremy Lawrance, University of Nottingham
Roundtable discussion

For enquiries please contact Jeremy Roe, jeremy.roe@fcsh.unl.pt