Tag Archives: early modern

Book Launch: ‘Black but Human’: Slavery and Visual Arts in Hapsburg Spain, 1480–1700′ by Carmen Fracchia, Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck University of London, 23 November 2019, 3–5pm

A book launch and Q&A will be held on the 23 November3–5pm, at the Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck University of London.

In this book launch, Birkbeck scholar Mpalive Msiska will interview Dr Carmen Fracchia, from the Department of Cultures and Languages, about her new book Black but Human: Slavery and Visual Arts in Hapsburg Spain, 1480–1700 (OUP, 2019). This will be followed by a brief conversation between the author and the visual artist Victoria Burgher, who will give a short presentation of her work.

Carmen Fracchia is a Paraguayan academic trained originally in Italian and Spanish Art History at the Universities of Siena and University College London. She is a Reader in Hispanic Art History at Birkbeck. Her work focuses on the visual articulations of Hispanic intellectual, political, and religious thought about local Spanish and transatlantic slavery, freedom, subjectivity, race, and hybridity, with special emphasis to the visual representations of Africans and Afro-Hispanic enslaved and liberated people, such as Juan de Pareja (Antequera, c.1610-Madrid, c.1670).

Mpalive Msiska is a Malawian academic who is a Reader in English and Humanities at Birkbeck where he teaches courses and supervises research work on Post-colonial and Global literatures as well as interdisciplinary subjects. He has previously taught at Bath Spa University and the University of Malawi, among others. His publications include Post-Colonial Identity in Wole Soyinka (2007), Wole Soyinka (1998), Writing and Africa (1997) and The Quiet Chameleon:  A Study of Poetry from Central Africa (1992) and the most recent chapter ‘Divine Ways of Cognition: the Burden of the Poet-Seer in Soyinka’s Idanre,’ in The Soyinka Impulse, eds Duro Oni and Bisi Adigun. He is a member of the Caine Prize Advisory Board, the Council of the British Institute in Eastern Africa as well as the Editorial Board of the Journal of Southern African Studies.

Victoria Burgher is a multi-disciplinary artist who lives and works in East London. She studied at Goldsmiths College (MA) and her politically engaged practice ranges from sculptural installations and site-specific interventions to collaborative community projects. She is interested in art’s ability to challenge histories and a fascination with materials and process inform her approach to making. Current work uses colonial commodities to decolonise the nostalgic narrative of Empire. She exhibits regularly in the UK and Europe.


Attendance is free but booking is necessary. Please click here to book and here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: ‘Art and Empire: The Golden Age of Spain’, The San Diego Museum of Art, CA, until 2 September 2019

The neo-plateresque façade of the museum, begun in 1924 and designed by William Templeton Johnson and Robert W. Snyder, with sculptures by Chris Muelle

This new exhibition features a diverse selection of more than 100 outstanding works produced by leading artists from Spain and its global territories.

Spain’s Golden Age may be defined as the extraordinary moment when the visual arts, architecture, literature, and music all reached unprecedented heights.

Art & Empire: The Golden Age of Spain is the first exhibition in the United States to expand the notion of “Golden Age” to include the Hispanic world beyond the shores of the Iberian Peninsula. Such far-flung Spanish-controlled centers as Antwerp, Naples, Mexico, Lima, and the Philippines are represented by paintings, sculpture and decorative arts of astounding quality and variety from the pivotal years of about 1660 to 1750.

Artists featured in the exhibition include Diego Velázquez, Peter Paul Rubens, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Francisco de Zurbarán, Jusepe de Ribera, El Greco, Juan de Valdés Leal, Juan Sánchez Cotán, and many more. This exhibition also marks the first time in the Museum’s history that all five of the Spanish masters represented on the Museum’s building façade —Velázquez, Murillo, Zurbarán, Ribera and El Greco— will be shown together at the Museum.

Also on display is a contemporary response to Art and Empire: The Golden Age of Spain, featuring a group of 12 encaustic-on-canvas “portraits” of Christ’s disciples by contemporary Spanish artist José-María Cano.

Click here for more information

Programme and Registration Details: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, 20th–21st June 2019, Senate Suite, Durham University Castle, Durham, UK


Organised by Stefano Cracolici and Edward Payne (Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, Durham University)

Free, but please register at this link: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/canons-and-repertoires-constructing-the-visual-arts-in-the-hispanic-world-registration-62569293441

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers will challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers will also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers will address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules.

PROGRAMME

Thursday 20 June 2019

09.30 – 10.00 Registration & Coffee
10.00 – 10.05Introduction & Welcome
10.05 – 11.20 Session 1: Historiographies
Chair: Stefano Cracolici (Durham University)
10.05 – 10.25 Why El Greco to Goya?
Edward Payne (Durham University)
10.25 – 10.45Frederic Leighton’s Vision of Spain
Véronique Gerard Powell (Sorbonne Université, Paris)
10.45 – 11.05  Nigel Glendinning and the Hispanic Research Journal: A Unique Voice in Spanish Cultural
History
Sarah Symmons (University of Essex)
11.05 – 11.20 Discussion
11.20 – 11.50 Tea & Coffee
11.50 – 12.50 Keynote Lecture:
Passion and Prejudice: Attitudes to Spanish Sculpture in Nineteenth-Century Britain
Holly Trusted (Victoria & Albert Museum, London)
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 15.15 Session 2: Geographies
Chair: Edward Payne (Durham University)
14.00 – 14.20 Beyond El Greco: The Travelling Artist between Italy and Spain—Artistic Translation and the
Sixteenth-Century Hispanic Canon
Piers Baker-Bates (The Open University)
14.20 – 14.40Maestros españoles en Chile: Espacios y repertorios
Marcela Drien (Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Santiago de Chile)
14.40 – 15.00 Geographic Limits and the History of the Spanish Avant-Garde
Maite Barragán (Albright College, Reading PA)
15.00 – 15.15 Discussion
15.15 – 16.30Session 3: Strategies
Chair: Tom Stammers (Durham University)
15.15 – 15.35Genaro Pérez Villaamil: Navigating Stereotypes
Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh)
15.35 – 15.55 Imaginary Architecture as Imagined Community: ‘The Market’ by Jenaro Pérez Villaamil
Matilde Mateo (Syracuse University)
15.55 – 16.15 Hieroglyphs of Providence: Pelegrín Clavé and Isabella I of Castile
Stefano Cracolici (Durham University)
16.15 – 16.30 Discussion
16.30 – 17.00 Tea & Coffee
17.00 – 18.00 Keynote Lecture
Canons and Repertoires in Hispanic Art: What does Stirling Maxwell have to do with them?
Hilary Macartney (University of Glasgow)

Friday 21 June 2019

9.30 – 10.00 Tea & Coffee
10.00 – 11.15 Session 4: Identities
Chair: Giovanna Capitelli (Università Roma Tre)
10.00 – 10.20 El arte español más allá de la península ibérica: ¿Qué significa ser un ‘artista español en la Nueva España’?
Luis Javier Cuesta Hernández (Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México)
10.20 – 10.40 Constructing the Monuments of the Nation: Victor Balaguer and the Struggle to Shape Monasteries as Spanishness
Josep-Maria Garcia-Fuentes (Newcastle University)
10.40 – 11.00 Thinking Spain from Barcelona: The Iconographic Repertoire of Spanish Art (1918–1922)
Lucila Mallart (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
11.00 – 11.15 Discussion
11.15 – 11.45Tea & Coffee
11.45 – 13.00Session 5: Remediations
Chair: Ludmilla Jordanova (Durham University)
11.45 – 12.05 Thinking through Painting: Artistic Practice as Metaphor in the Early Modern Hispanic World
Adam Jasienski (Southern Methodist University, Dallas TX)
12.05 – 12.25 From Mimesis to Montage: Sergei Eisenstein on El Greco
Dušan Radunović (Durham University)
12.25 – 12.45 ‘Ese Velázquez sí que era un genio’: el canon del arte español y la ficción televisiva
Luis Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez (Universitat de València)
12.45 – 13.00 Discussion
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 14.20Concluding Remarks
Amaya Alzaga Ruiz (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid)
14.20 – 15.00 Roundtable Discussion
15.00 – 16.00 Refreshment

Maius Workshop Meeting: Emily Floyd, ‘The Word as Object in Colonial South America’, QMUL, 3 June 2018, 4:30pm–5:30pm

The Maius Workshop’s next event will take place at 4:30–5:30 pm on 3 June 2019 at QMUL (Arts Two, room 2.18).

We are delighted to welcome Emily Floyd, Lecturer in Visual Culture and Art before 1700 at UCL, for a conversation on her forthcoming article, ‘The Word as Object in Colonial South America’. A draft of the article will be pre-circulated, and Emily looks forward to the group’s comments and questions.

Please email maiusworkshop@gmail.com to sign up to this free event.

***How to find Arts Two, room 2.18: the Arts Two building is number 35 on the campus map at this link. The campus is best accessed through the East Gate entrance. Please note that the Arts Two building does not have an entrance on Mile End Road.

Conference: Las mujeres y las artes en la corte española, Madrid, 20–22 February 2019, Universidad Complutense, Madrid

1387-portadaws-1

Programme

MIÉRCOLES, 20 DE FEBRERO

09:30 Registro de participantes

10:00 Inauguración. Jaime M. de los Santos. Consejero de Cultura, Turismo y Deporte. Comunidad de Madrid. Presentación.  Miguel Luque. Decano de la Facultad.

MESA I. MUJERES PROTAGONISTAS DE LAS ARTES.
MODERA FÉLIX DÍAZ MORENO (UCM)

10:30 Plautilla Bricci: cronaca di un oblio. Consuelo Lollobrigida (Univ. of Arkansas – William J. Fulbright School of Arts and Sciences)

11:00  Pintoras flamencas en los siglos XVI y XVII: las sagas familiares y el talento. Ana Diéguez-Rodríguez (Instituto Moll. Centro de investigación en pintura flamenca Univ. de Burgos)

11:30  Pausa café

12:30  Vidas y afanes de las dos impresoras novohispanas del siglo XVIII: Rosa Teresa Poveda y Manuela de la Ascensión Cerezo. Marina Garone Gravier (Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, Univ. Nacional Autónoma de México)

13:00  Mujeres artistas en la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Carlos de Valencia. Mariángeles Pérez-Martín (Univ. de València)

13:30  Debate. Comida

MESA II. IDENTIDADES FEMENINAS, GENERADORAS DE ESPACIOS.
MODERAN CONCEPCIÓN LOPEZOSA APARICIO (UCM) Y SARA FUENTES LÁZARO (UNIV. A DISTANCIA DE MADRID)

16:00 De la casa al hogar. Aposentos femeninos en la Edad Moderna. Gloria Franco Rubio (UCM)

16:30 “Fare scena della casa”. Isabel de Farnesio y la arquitectura pintada en La Granja de San Ildefonso. Sara Fuentes Lázaro (Univ. a Distancia de Madrid)

17:00 Sociabilidad, ciudad y género en la crisis del Antiguo Régimen. Aproximaciones desde la cultura visual y material. Álvaro Molina (Univ. Nacional de Educación a Distancia)

17:30 “Mujeres en el límite”. Presencias femeninas en el Paseo del Prado de Madrid. Concepción Lopezosa Aparicio (UCM)

18:00 Debate

JUEVES, 21 DE FEBRERO

MESA III. LAS ARTES Y LA PRÁCTICA DEL PODER
MODERAN MAGDALENA DE LAPUERTA (UCM) Y MIGUEL HERMOSO CUESTA (UCM)

10:00 Il mecenatismo di Bona Sforza alla corte di Bari nella prima metà del ‘500. Mimma Pasculli (Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro. Dpto. Lettere, Lingue e Arti)

10:30 Sofonisba Anguissola y la construcción de una imagen femenina para la familia Habsburgo. Jorge Sebastián Lozano (Univ. de València)

11:00 Patrimonio y encargos artísticos de Juana Cortés, II duquesa de Alcalá. Sergio Ramiro Ramírez (UCM)

11:30 Debate

12:00 Pausa café

12:30 La perla de la Monarquía hispana: Margarita de Austria y el retrato cortesano. Magdalena de Lapuerta Montoya (UCM)

13:00  Sor Ana Dorotea de Austria y la exaltación de las mujeres fuertes. Cipriano García-Hidalgo Villena (UCM)

13:30  María Isabel de Braganza y la música. Judith Ortega Rodríguez (ICCMU-UCM)

14:00  Debate. Comida

WORKSHOP (LUGAR: SALA DE JUNTAS). CUARTOS DE MUJERES. ESPACIOS DONDE VIVIR Y TRABAJAR EN EL SIGLO XVI

16:30  Presentación a cargo de Beatriz Blasco Esquivias (UCM). Intervienen: Elena Díez Jorge (Univ. de Granada), Ana Aranda Bernal (Univ. Pablo Olavide, Sevilla), María Núñez – González (Univ. de Sevilla)

18:00  Debate

VIERNES, 22 DE FEBRERO

MESA IV. EL ARTE EN SUS MANOS.  LOS MUSEOS Y LA GESTIÓN DEL PATRIMONIO
MODERA JONATAN JAIR LÓPEZ MUÑOZ (UCM)

10:00 Las mujeres y la arqueología en Europa: de la aristocracia a las clases medias. Margarita Díaz-Andreu (ICREA y Univ. de Barcelona)

10:30 Mujeres y museos en Europa  del Este. Laura Coltofean-Arizancu (Univ. de Barcelona)

11:00 Las profesionales de museos en España, una historia envuelta en silencios. Margarita Moreno Conde (Museo Arqueológico Nacional)

11:30 Debate. Pausa café

WORKSHOP
INVESTIGACIONES PREDOCTORALES
Presentación a cargo de María Ángeles Toajas Roger (UCM)

12:00 Aproximación al estudio de las mujeres en los talleres artísticos de la Villa de Madrid (1561–1700). Alba Gómez de Zamora Sanz  (UCM)

12:20 La decoración del Cuarto de la Reina en el Alcázar Real de Madrid bajo Isabel de Borbón- Introducción y reflexiones. Audrey-Caroline Michielon (UCM / Univ. de Toulouse –  Jean Jaurès )

12:40 El estudio de la moda femenina en la corte: Cuestiones metodológicas. María Redondo Solance  (UCM)

13:00 Las mujeres y las artes en “la hora navarra del XVIII”. Sergio Rodero Jiménez (UCM)

13:20 Mujeres en las actas de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Daniel Lavín González (UCM)

13:40 Debate y conclusiones del Segundo Seminario. Comida

VISITA GUIADA: REAL MONASTERIO DE LA ENCARNACIÓN
16:30 Encuentro frente al Monasterio. Plaza de la Encarnación, 1 (28013 Madrid)

Practical information 

Location: Salón de Grados y Sala de Juntas, Facultad de Geografía e Historia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, February 20–22, 2019

Registration deadline: Feb 20, 2019

Scientific committee:
Antonio Bonet Correa, Rosario Camacho, Benito Navarrete, Mª Ángeles Pérez Samper, Javier Rivera Blanco.

Organisers:
Gloria Del Val, Sara Fuentes, Daniel Lavín, Jonatan Jair López, Sergio Ramiro, Sergio Rodero.

Supported by the Proyecto de Investigación I+D+i FEMENINO SINGULAR. Las mujeres y las artes en la Corte española de la Edad Moderna (reinas, nobles, artistas y empresarias) [HAR2015-65166-P MINECO/FEDER]

Email the organisers: lasmujeresylasartes@gmail.com

Website: https://www.ucm.es/femenino_singular/

Featured exhibition: ‘La hija del Virrey. El mundo femenino novohispano en el siglo XVII’, Museo de América, Madrid, until 3 March

banner20la20hija20del20virrey.jpg

Curated by Andrés Gutiérrez Usillos, this exhibition focuses on an anonymous portrait of c. 1670. The work represents Doña María Luisa de Toledo, daughter of the Marquis of Mancera, Viceroy of New Spain, accompanied by a tattooed Indigenous woman. The show explores the world of the women portrayed in the painting, for example by reconstructing Doña María Luisa de Toledo’s trousseau, composed mainly of American and Asian items acquired in Mexico. The presentation thus analyses the clashes and encounters among the different worlds which coexisted in Viceregal America from a rare female perspective.

 Click here for more information, and here for an exhibition brochure.

Conference: Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era, London, November 8–9, 2018

slid-angelesVenue: Senate House, Bedford Room 37 (8th Nov); Bush House, KCL S2.01 and Instituto Cervantes (9th Nov)

Keynote speakers: Prof Trevor Dadson and Dr Alexander Samson

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.

Click here for a full programme and here to book tickets

Organisers: Roser López Cruz (King’s College London) and Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Conference website: https://iberianintolerance.com