Tag Archives: Iberian Peninsula

ONLINE SEMINAR: Material Culture and Identity: The Moriscos in Early Modern Iberia, 02 March 2021, 12.30-2.00pm

Image: Christoph Weiditz, The Morisco Dance, Das Trachtenbuch (1529). Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg.

The Centres for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS) & for Medieval and Early Modern Worlds (CMEMW) warmly invite you to the seminar 

 Material Culture and Identity: The Moriscos in Early Modern Iberia  

Professor Borja Franco (Honorary Research Fellow at CILAVS) 

Chair and mini response: Michael Pope (Cultures & Languages, PhD student) 

Tuesday, 02 March 2021 from 12.30 to 2.00pm Live Online  

Book your place now. 

The Christian conquest of Granada (1492) triggered the conversion and acculturation of Muslims living in the Iberian Peninsula, who were henceforth known as “Moriscos”. As this process did not unfold in a uniform fashion, Christian doctrine was unevenly assimilated across the territory. Records of material culture in Morisco homes can shed light on the extent of religious conversion in the different geographical areas.   

Inventories of New Christian homes were traditionally compiled without reference to their counterparts among Old Christians who were subjecting and converting the Moriscos to Christianity. It is therefore important to study Old and New Christian inventories in parallel to identify any points of contact between them. On the one hand, this research will reveal how Moriscos projected their identity onto personal possessions, including devotional figures which would in fact have represented very unusual choices among Old Christians. On the other, it will show a clear hybridization of customs, as evidenced by the many objects associated to Medieval Islamic tradition found in Old Christian homes, such as adargas (shields), almalafas (robes), ‘Morisco style’ furniture, etc. The aim of this presentation is, firstly, to explore the defining features that set these two communities apart as revealed by both Old and New Christian material culture; and secondly, to learn how such objects were perceived, based on extant descriptions. Taken in combination, these sources can shed light on aspects of daily life among these coexisting communities, the way they made their different identities visible, and their emotional practices. 

Borja Franco Llopis is a Professor at the Department of Art History in the UNED (Spain). His research is devoted to the visual and literary representation of the otherness in Southern Europe. He has been a visiting scholar in several prestigious institutions such as the School of History and Archaeology in Rome, the Instituto Storico per el Medievo (Rome), the Warburg Institute (London), Johns Hopkins University, University of California (Berkeley), Harvard University, Columbia University, Universidade Nova of Lisbon and NYU; and Visiting Professor at the University of Genoa. He is Associate Professor at the Department of Art History in the UNED (Spain), the PI of the research group “Before Orientalism. Images of the Muslim Other in Iberia (15-17th Centuries) and their Mediterranean connections” and working Group Leader of the Cost Action 18129: Islamic Legacy: Narratives East, West, South, North of the Mediterranean. He has recently published the monographs titled: Pintando al converso: la imagen del morisco en la peninsula ibérica (1492-1614) (Cátedra, 2019), and Etnicità e conversione. Immagini di moriscos nella cultural visuale dell’età moderna (Affinità Elettive, 2020). He has also co-edited the book: Muslim and Jews made Visible in Christian Iberia and beyond (14-18th centuries) (Brill 2019). 

The event is free, but booking is required.

The Maius Masterclass with Professor Susan Boynton, 31 July 2020, 4pm on Zoom

For the final event in the Maius Masterclass series, on Friday 31 July at 4pm, they are delighted to welcome Professor Susan Boynton (Columbia University). Susan’s research has focused on such topics as music in the Iberian peninsula, liturgy, manuscript studies, and intersections between music and the visual arts.

Please click here to register for the Zoom Webinar.

The series is kindly supported by a Hispanex Grant from the Spanish Ministry of Culture and SPAIN Arts & Culture/Embassy of Spain in London.

New Page Announcement: 3D Models

screenshot from the 3D model of the cloister of the Cathedral of Leon by Miguel Bandera

There is a new page on the ARTES website dedicated to 3D models of architecture and objects from the Iberian Peninsula (click here). A page dedicated to 3D models for Latin America is coming soon. Find them under the ‘Online Resources’ tab on the top of the site. These lists are not exhaustive, and will be updated regularly.

Have anything to add to the Iberian list, or ideas for the Latin American list? Please comment on this post with your suggestions (‘leave a reply’).

Call for Articles: The Iberian Peninsula under Debate: Historiography, Cultural Encounters and Identities (5th-16th centuries)

 

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A Sé Velha de Coimbra, por Roque Gameiro (1917)

Roda da Fortuna. Revista Eletrônica sobre Antiguidade e Medievo (Electronic Journal about Antiquity and Middle Ages) seeks submission for a thematic dossier, “The Iberian Peninsula under Debate: Historiography, Cultural Encounters and Identities (5th-16th centuries).”

 

Heiress of the Hispanic-Visigothic tradition, the territorial organization of the Iberian Peninsula was the result of a singular historical reality. The Muslims’ invasion of the region in the 8th century intensified the cultural heterogeneity already existing in the region, adding to political-religious conflicts and an ever-changing border. This state of hostility and also, at various moments, of interaction solidified in the experience of Al-Andalus. This peculiar region offers an important and broad interpretative possibility. With the advance of the Christian frontier after the formation of the Portuguese kingdom and the conquests of Cordova (1236) and Seville (1248), the map of the Peninsula changed definitively.

This thematic dossier intends to gather articles that discuss the Iberian experience during the Middle Ages, up to what has been defined as “maritime expansion” in modern historiography. Encompassing multiple research possibilities and varied approaches in such fields as representations, identities, and religious confessions, the debates on the Iberian worlds constitute an enormous challenge to the historian.

The deadline for submitting articles, reviews, and translations are:
– Submission of proposals: until April 30, 2019
– Acceptance of works: July 2019
– Dossier published: August 2019

Proposals must be sent to the e-mail: revistarodadafortuna@gmail.com 

Click here for more information.

 

Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies (JMIS): Best Article Prize (2015)

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Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies: Best Article Prize (2015). The editors of the Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies (JMIS) and Routledge announce the first annual $500 prize for the most outstanding article published in JMIS in 2015.
All articles published in JMIS in 2015 will automatically be considered for the Best Article Prize, and all submissions received during the calendar year 2014 will be considered for publication in 2015.
We welcome work that engages peninsular Iberia in relation to other parts of the ‘post-classical’ world, which explores links of colonization and exchange with the Maghreb, addresses Iberia’s presence in the Mediterranean, or adopts a transatlantic frame.
The prize will be awarded by a panel of judges appointed by the Editor-in-Chief of JMIS. The judges’ decision will be final, and no correspondence will be entered into.
All submissions should be uploaded electronically through our online submission system (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jmis).
The Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies (JMIS) is an interdisciplinary journal for innovative scholarship on the multiple languages, cultures, and historical processes of the Iberian Peninsula, and the zones with which it was in contact. We encourage submission of all innovative scholarship of interest to the community of medievalists and Iberianists. JMIS, which aims to bring theoretically informed approaches into creative contact with more empirically minded scholarship, encompasses archaeology, art and architecture, music, philosophy and religious studies, as well as history, codicology, manuscript studies and the multiple Arabic, Latin, Romance, and Hebrew linguistic and literary traditions of Iberia.
Please direct any inquiries to Simon R. Doubleday, Hofstra University.