Online Lecture: Masters of the Spanish Golden Age: Velázquez, Cano and Murillo, Director of the Wallace Collection and expert on Spanish art, Dr Xavier Bray, 26 November, 7-8 pm

Diego Velázquez, The Lady with a Fan, c. 1640, The Wallace Collection

Talk Description: Among the treasures of the Wallace Collection is a modest but very fine collection of Spanish paintings. They were largely collected by the 4th Marquess of Hertford in the 1830s and 1840s in Paris, when the fashion for collecting Spanish art was at its highest and works by Murillo and Velázquez were much sought after. The 4th Marquess acquired a total of thirteen paintings attributed to Murillo and eight to Velázquez, along with the only known Alonso Cano painting in the United Kingdom.

Although modern day scholarship no longer accepts some of these paintings as fully autograph, the Wallace Collection contains several icons of Spanish art such as Velázquez’s enigmatic portrait of a The Lady with the Fan and Murillo’s exquisite The Marriage of the Virgin, painted on a mahogany panel.

Join Director of the Wallace Collection and expert on Spanish art, Dr Xavier Bray, who will explore the context in which these works were made, whether Spanish ecclesiastical institution or royal palace, and their importance in the wider context of collecting in 19th-century Europe.

Please click here for more information and registration

The Maius Workshop Returns! 24th November 2020, 5pm, on Zoom

Francisco de Goya, The Picnic, 1776, Museo del Prado

The Maius Workshop is back virtually for the 2020–21 academic year!

Please join us for an informal welcome meeting, which will take place on Tuesday 24th November 2020, at 5:00 p.m. on Zoom.

This event is open to anyone interested in Hispanic cultures, widely considered: literature and language, history, geography, art and visual culture, medical humanities, music, etc., from Iberia, the Americas, and any other Spanish and Portuguese communities. We particularly welcome PhD students and early career researchers.

The Maius Workshop’s organisers, Costanza, Bert and Elizabeth, will introduce the group and events planned for the coming academic year. This will be an opportunity to meet people with similar research interests working at other universities and departments.

Click here to register in advance for this meeting:

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Online seminar from the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS) in the School of Arts, at Birkbeck University: The destruction of images in the medieval and early modern world: Jews, Muslims, Protestants and Catholics in Iberia, by Professor Borja Franco, 20 November 2020 6-7.30pm

CILAVS warmly invites you to the seminar The destruction of images in the medieval and early modern world: Jews, Muslims, Protestants and Catholics in Iberia
Professor Borja Franco
Friday, 20 November 2020 from 6 to 7.30pm Live Online

 Book your place now

In this paper, Prof Borja Franco presents the main written and visual sources that captured trials for iconoclastic behaviour in medieval and early modern Iberia. He shall explore the reasons for these actions and their political and religious repercussions. A comparative study of the various socio-religious groups reveals that the theological discourse behind each iconoclastic action varied with each case study. Furthermore, it will be shown that iconoclastic attitudes were not the exclusive territory of ‘heretics’ or ‘infidels’ and that even Catholics were persecuted for their hostile attitudes to images.

Borja Franco Llopis is a Professor at the Department of Art History in the UNED (Spain). His research is devoted to the visual and literary representation of the otherness in Southern Europe. He has been a visiting scholar in several prestigious institutions such as the School of History and Archaeology in Rome, the Instituto Storico per el Medievo (Rome), the Warburg Institute (London), Johns Hopkins University, University of California (Berkeley), Harvard University, Columbia University, Universidade Nova of Lisbon and NYU; and Visiting Professor at the University of Genoa. He is Associate Professor at the Department of Art History in the UNED (Spain), the PI of the research group “Before Orientalism. Images of the Muslim Other in Iberia (15-17th Centuries) and their Mediterranean connections” and working Group Leader of the Cost Action 18129: Islamic Legacy: Narratives East, West, South, North of the Mediterranean. He has recently published the monographs titled: Pintando al converso: la imagen del morisco en la peninsula ibérica (1492-1614) (Cátedra, 2019), and Etnicità e conversione. Immagini di moriscos nella cultural visuale dell’età moderna (Affinità Elettive, 2020). He has also co-edited the book: Muslim and Jews made Visible in Christian Iberia and beyond (14-18th centuries) (Brill 2019).


The event is free, although you will need to book.

A Spanish female artist of the early modern period – ‘Finding Luisa Roldán: A North American road trip’, a blog post by Dr. Cathy Hall-van den Elsen

The Education of the Virgin, 1680s, by Luisa Roldán. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

‘The Spanish sculptor Luisa Roldán (1652–1706) was recognised in her lifetime as an artist of considerable talent. Luisa was born in Seville, the daughter of Pedro Roldán, a prominent sculptor.’

Please click here to read the rest of Dr. Cathy Hall-van den Elsen’s blog post on Art Herstory to find more on Luisa Roldán’s works in North American collections.

Text excerpt and image from Dr. Cathy Hall-van den Elsen’s blog post on Art Herstory.

Online Conference: Poetry in paint: Titian’s late mythologies, Organised by the National Gallery, November 3rd, 10th, & 17th

Detail from Titian, ‘Diana and Callisto’, 1556-9 © The National Gallery, London

An online conference about the history, context and reception of Titian’s mythological paintings, or ‘poesie’, for Philip II.

For more information, including ticket prices, the full programme, and how to register, please click here.

New and noteworthy exhibition openings in Spain, October 2020

El Greco (1541-1614). Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane or Christ on the Mount of Olives (c. 1600). Colección Pittas.

Obras maestras de la colección Valdés, Museo de Bellas Artes, Bilbao, 7 October 2020 – 1 February 2021.

The first exhibition devoted to the art collection of the Bilbao businessman Félix Fernández-Valdés (1895- 1976), 4 of whose paintings entered the Prado’s collection after his death and others are now distributed around other public and private collections in Spain. The exhibition shows 79 works out of a total of over 400, ranging from the medieval period to the 20th century and include paintings by El Greco, Luis de Morales, Anton van Dyck, José de Ribera, Francisco de Zurbarán, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Juan de Valdés Leal, Carreño, Francisco de Goya, Eduardo Rosales, Mariano Fortuny, Darío de Regoyos, Joaquín Sorolla, Ignacio Zuloaga, Julio Romero de Torres, Daniel Vázquez Díaz, José Gutiérrez Solana. The exhibition reconstructs one of the most important private collections of the second half of the 20th century, and one which was not only rich in ‘Golden Age’ Spanish paintings, but also medieval Spanish art, with a significant triptych by Bernardo Serra, a panel by Fernando Gallego and the triptych from Quejana (in Álava), and works from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Gaudí & trencadís Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia, 2 October 2020 – 31 January 2021.

An exhibition sponsored by the World Monuments Fund which investigates the origin, development and techniques used by the Catalan architect Gaudí to create his signature trencadís, a form of mosaic with which many of his architectural forms were covered. The display shows 53 works, 33 of which are original (four from the Valencian museum) and 20 are reproductions made for didactic purpose, by the conservator Montse Agüero. The exhibition divides into two parts, the first explored the links between the trencadís and ancient mosaic techniques whether as practised by Romans or Venetians, in stone or ceramics. The second section analyses the development of the technique within Gaudí’s work from the Torre Güell, the first building in which he used trencadís, and has a special display about the use of the technique in Valencia itself, especially on its railway station Estación del Norte and on the facades of the houses in the suburb of Cabanyal. A five-minute video in which one of the craftsmen working on the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona explains in Catalan (with Castilian subtitles) how the workshop creates the trencadis for the cathedral spires, is found at https://youtu.be/hSbDvnV9A98

REMINDER: Artemisia Gentileschi Visit to the National Gallery on November 5th

Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Self Portrait as a Lute Player’, c. 1615-17, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut. Charles H. Schwartz Endowment Fund 2014.4.1 © Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

ONLY 2 PLACES STILL AVAILABLE

Please contact Susan Wilson at <susanruddwilson@gmail.com> asap if you wish to attend. 

We are pleased to let ARTES members know that a small visit to Artemisia Gentileschi will take place on Thursday  November 5th at 0915.

Gentileschi spent some years working in Naples (from 1630- until her death, thought to have occurred in 1652, when it was part of the Spanish Empire.) Her  patrons  included Phillip IV and his ambassadors and Viceroys, eg The Duke of Alcala. We thought it made sense to visit the exhibition and follow on developing our understanding of the Spanish in Naples. 

Due to the pandemic places are limited, to 10 only, masks must be worn and social distancing  of 2 metres observed. We cannot form groups as we go through the exhibition. 

If you want to include “Titian” please make an online booking for later that morning as  combining the two exhibitions is not now possible due to the pandemic.

Meet Susan Wilson at the Sainsbury Wing Entrance at 0900 to enter at 0915. 

Latecomers cannot be admitted. NB: If you reserve a place and cannot attend please let me know immediately as we can run a waiting list for this visit, but I would need to swap names over.

Please contact Susan Wilson at <susanruddwilson@gmail.com> asap if you wish to attend.