Mexico 1968 Documentary Series, Instituto Cervantes, London, 02/10/2018 to 23/10/2018

Memorial del 68
1968 is a turning point for many countries that experienced the effects of the desire for revolution of young people, who had been born after the Second World War and did not feel the commitment of historical debt to those events and the type of life that was founded after. The Mexican case was especially painful because the student and social claims were violently repressed by the state forces that ended in what is known as the Tlatelolco massacre. On October 2 1968, more than three hundred people were killed by the army. This bloody response volatilized the desire for change and led to the start of the Olympics in Mexico, which took place between October 12 and 27, making Mexico a place visited by athletes from all over the world.
The programme will be introduced with a documentary by director Nicolás Echeverría, which recovers the voice of its protagonists, the informative display of the events and some conclusions and interpretations about them, thirty years later. Memorial del 68 allows us to understand the complexity of this year in which young Mexicans tried to change the world. Other documentary films complete the programme, which will be extended over four evenings in October, always followed by conversations with the public, a collaboration between the Institute of Mexican Studies / UNAM in London and the Cervantes Institute in London.
For more information about events in the series, click here.
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ARTES Event: Curator’s Tour of ‘Ribera: Art of Violence,’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery, 28 September 2018

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ARTES members are invited to join ARTES’s committee member Dr Edward Payne for a special tour of the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence at Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-curated by Edward and ARTES member Dr Xavier Bray.

The curator-led tour will take place in the morning of Friday 28 September. The event will run as follows:

9.00–9.15 Coffee and welcome at Gail’s, 91 Dulwich Village, London SE21 7BJ, UK

9.15–9.45 Introduction: Why Ribera? Why violence? Why Dulwich Picture Gallery?

9.45–10.00 Private viewing of the exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (doors open to the general public at 10.00)

10.00–11.30 Curator-led tour of the exhibition followed by Q&A and general discussion

This event is free but spaces are limited. Please write to artesiberia@gmail.com to book your place.

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Ribera: Art of Violence is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

Click here for more information about the exhibition and related events.

 

1 week to go! ‘Ribera: Art of Violence’ opens 26 September 2018 at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

ribera-martiri-de-sant-bartomeu-large-bannerThis autumn, Dulwich Picture Gallery will present the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

613cmo6qaylA scholarly catalogue will accompany the exhibition, showcasing the new research which has informed the display.

Ribera: Art of Violence is co-curated by ARTES committee member Dr Edward Payne, author of a PhD thesis on the theme of violence in Ribera’s art (2012) and contributor to the catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings (2016), and Dr Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection), former Arturo and Holly Melosi Chief Curator at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and curator of the National Gallery’s exhibitions The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700 (2009) and Goya: The Portraits (2015).

The exhibition will be accompanied by an exciting series of events, from an international study day to Animalisa contemporary dance performance. Here is a selection of the most interesting…

  • Ribera: Curator’s Introduction with Dr Edward Payne, 27 September 2018, 12.30pm–1.30pm
  • Skin Deepa workshop on tattoos and skin art led by Dr Matt Lodder, tattoo historian, and Alex Binnie, tattoo artist. 19 October 2018, 7–9.30pm
  • From the Collection: The Aftermath of Violencea journey through shock, grief, acceptance and healing, led by Jennifer Scott, The Sackler Director of Dulwich Picture Gallery, and based on works by Carlo Dolci, Rubens, Van Dyck and Poussin in the Gallery’s collection. 2 November 2018, 12.30–1.30pm
  •  Ribera: Curator’s Introduction with Dr Xavier Bray, 8 November 2018, 7.30pm–8.30pm
  • Beneath The Skin of Ribera’s Bodiesa lecture by Dr Jack Hartnell, Lecturer in Art History at the University of East Anglia. The lecture will reveal the complex and fascinating ways in which the people of the Middle Ages thought about, explored and experienced their physical selves. 30 November 2018, 12.30pm–1.30pm
  • Ribera Study Day, a day of in-depth discussions around the role of violence in art, which will bring together a range of multi-disciplined creative and scholarly minds to prod, probe and discuss profound questions exploring the many facets of Ribera’s work. 10 December 2018, 2.00pm–5.00pm
  • Art and Violence in Renaissance Florence, a lecture by Dr Scott Nethersole, Senior Lecturer in Italian Renaissance Art at The Courtauld Institute of Art in London. This event will explore the relationship between art and violence in 15th-century Florence, exposing the underbelly of a period more often celebrated for enlightened and progressive ideas. 18 January 2019, 12.30–1.30pm

And last but not least, a curator-led tour for ARTES members, which will take place on 28 September 2018 from 9.00am.

Clark Fellowships: CENTER FOR SPAIN IN AMERICA FELLOWSHIP, The Clark, deadline October 15, 2018

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The Clark Art Institute combines a public art museum with a complex of research and academic programs, including a major art history library. The Clark is an international center for discussion on the nature of art and its history.

Fellowships are awarded every year to established and promising scholars with the aim of fostering a critical commitment to inquiry in the theory, history, and interpretation of art and visual culture. In addition to providing an opportunity for sustained research for fellows, outside of their usual professional obligations, the Clark encourages them to participate in a variety of collaborative and public discussions on diverse art historical topics as well as on larger questions and motivations that shape the practice of art history.

Sponsored by the Center for Spain in America, this one-semester fellowship is intended to support the study of all aspects of Spanish art from the early medieval period to the beginning of the twentieth century, as well as the worldwide impact of Spanish art and artists. In addition to research for a publication and/or exhibition on specific artists or periods, we welcome projects examining collecting and connoisseurship of Spanish art—particularly in the Americas—and the influence and importance of Spanish art and its reception throughout the world.

Deadline: October 15, 2018

Click here for more information

Featured Exhibition: Plata de los Andes, Museo de Arte de Lima, until 28 October

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Armadillo-shaped perfumer
c. 1825-1830
silver
38,7 x 31,3 x 20 cm
Colección Ferrand, Lima

This exhibition showcases five centuries of Andean silver-work through more than 350 silver pieces, dating from the conquest to the 20th century.  Curated by Ricardo Kusunoki and Eduardo Wuffarden, this major show is a unique occasion to see works never previously displayed to the public, from ecclesiastical, private and public collections in Lima, Cuzco, Arequipa and elsewhere in the country.

Click here for more information.

ARTES Event: Curator’s Tour of ‘Ribera: Art of Violence,’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery, 28 September 2018

ribera-apollo-and-marsyas-banner

ARTES members are invited to join ARTES’s committee member Dr Edward Payne for a special tour of the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence at Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-curated by Edward and ARTES member Dr Xavier Bray.

The curator-led tour will take place in the morning of Friday 28 September. The event will run as follows:

9.00–9.15 Coffee and welcome at Gail’s, 91 Dulwich Village, London SE21 7BJ, UK

9.15–9.45 Introduction: Why Ribera? Why violence? Why Dulwich Picture Gallery?

9.45–10.00 Private viewing of the exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (doors open to the general public at 10.00)

10.00–11.30 Curator-led tour of the exhibition followed by Q&A and general discussion

This event is free but spaces are limited. Please write to artesiberia@gmail.com to book your place.

01613386710_h-british-museum-cropped-large-banner

Ribera: Art of Violence is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

Click here for more information about the exhibition and related events.

 

Opens 9 October: Bartolomé Bermejo at the Prado Museum, Madrid

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Open until 27 January 2019, this exhibition explores the career of Bartolomé Bermejo, one of the most fascinating figures within Spanish art of the second half of the 15th century. Bringing together a remarkable group of paintings from Spanish, European and American museums, the Prado is able to present this survey exhibition, which has been organized with the collaboration of the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya and, for the first time, allows for an appreciation of the technical virtuosity and distinctive visual universe of this Cordovan painter active in the Kingdom of Aragon.

For more information, click here.