ARTES Glendinning Lecture 2018, Instituto Cervantes, London, 22 March 2018

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New Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for the Study of Spanish Art, Museo Nacional del Prado/Meadows Museum

recortadab-2The Meadows Museum at SMU in Dallas and the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid have announced a new pre-doctoral fellowship, part of the unique international partnership that unites these two leading museums. A grant from the Center for Spain in America (CSA) supports now the pre-doctoral Meadows/Prado Fellowship, designed to provide students with an intensive scholarly, professional, and international experience in curatorial work. The fellowships are an annual exchange with one appointment made by each institution.

The CSA and its Spanish counterpart, the CEEH, have collaborated with the Meadows Museum on several projects prior to this announcement, including the exhibition and catalogue for The Lost Manuscripts from the Sistine Chapel: An Epic Journey from Rome to Toledo (2011); the exhibition and catalogue for The Spanish Gesture: Drawings From Murillo to Goya in the Hamburger Kunsthalle (2014); Sorolla in America: Friends and Patrons (2015); and the exhibition catalogue Zurbarán: Jacob and His Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle (2017).

Applications accepted until March 23, 2018

Forthcoming Exhibition: ‘Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida’ at the Meadows Museum, Dallas

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Eduardo Chillida, Peine del Vento, 1977
San Sebastián, Guipuzkoa, Spain

This spring, the Meadows Museum will present Dallas’s first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Eduardo Chillida (1924–2002). Chillida, one of Spain’s most celebrated modern sculptors, is famous for his monumental iron and stone sculptures that shape both urban and rural landscapes. This exhibition includes 66 of the artist’s works, from his sculptures, to his drawings, collages, gravitations, graphic works, and a selection of his books. Co-curated by William Jeffett, chief curator of exhibitions for The Dalí Museum, and Ignacio Chillida, the artist’s son, the works in Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida come exclusively from the Museo Chillida-Leku in Hernani (San Sebastián, Spain); the exhibition travels to Dallas from the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. A complimentary exhibition, Chillida in Dallas: De Musica at the Meyerson, is curated by Meadows/Mellon/Prado Curatorial Fellow Amanda W. Dotseth and will focus on the landmark commission by Chillida at Dallas’s Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. The two exhibitions will open on February 4, 2018, and run through June 3.

The exhibition will be accompanied by an educational programme which will include:

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 10:30 A.M.
LUIS CHILLIDA, director, Fundación Eduardo Chillida-Pilar Belzunce
Memory, Mind, Matter: The Public Art of Eduardo Chillida in

Focus

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 12:15 P.M.
AMANDA W. DOTSETH, Meadows/Mellon/Prado curatorial fellow, Meadows
Museum
Medieval and Modern: Alabaster from Gil de Siloé to
Eduardo Chillida

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 6:00-7:00 P.M.
BEATRIZ CORDERO, professor, Saint Louis University, Madrid
Lightness and Rightness: Eduardo Chillida and James Johnson
Sweeney in the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 12:15 P.M.
JED MORSE, chief curator, Nasher Sculpture Center
Chillida in Dallas Part I: Chillida Downtown

SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 10:00 A.M.-1:00 P.M.
FAMILY DAY

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 12:15 P.M.
SCOTT WINTERROWD, director of education, Meadows Museum
Chillida in Dallas Part II: Chillida in Dallas

 

Doctoral Studentship for Spanish Architecture at the University of Warwick

zamora_15825The university of Warwick is offering a Doctoral Studentship to a UK/EU candidate, focusing on ‘Petrifying Wealth: Religious buildings in Zamora, 11th-13th Centuries: building processes, forms and functions’

Outline of the project 

The construction of churches or church buildings is obviously as old as the dominance of Christianity in Western societies. The petrification of ecclesiastical wealth, however, implied a more recognisable and enduring presence for this institution throughout the medieval landscape, both urban and rural. The building of churches, and to a lesser extent monasteries, was also promoted by the laity. These were initiatives and investments that were partly religious in origin, in so far as they were ways to ensure the eternal salvation of the founders or of the community involved. The proliferation of masonry-built churches may also raise the question of other objectives of the secular world. Sometimes the laity invested in churches to provide a new, or at least a stronger, more formalised and more recognizable community identity.

Aims and Objectives
The aims and objectives therefore constitute four research strands:

• Contribution to the analysis of the material evidence both on a macro scale and regionally. Census and systematization through a database of churches in the regions selected through a Geographic Information System (GIS).

• Census and chronology of the foundations of family churches, paying particular attention to those endowed by women.

• Estimation of construction costs. Evaluation of aspects related to the production and transport of the materials used, the distance from the quarries of origin, the use of new stone and the reuse of old materials.

• Testing of the hypotheses concerning the functionality and use of the elements of the churches.

Methodology
Fieldwork in Zamora will identify the buildings that will form the focus of the study and these will then be examined archaeologically to determine the materials and the means of construction. Particular attention will focus on the precise recording of masons’ marks and on the compilation of a database of these marks and their locations for each building. These databases will be integrated into the larger database of the whole Petrifying Wealth project.

Outcome
The research will make a substantial contribution to the overall project and will form a discrete section of the database of material relating both to Spain and to the wider context of the project. It will inform further debate on the construction of stone buildings in medieval Europe and the means and methods of construction.

Studentship
The PhD studentship will be based at the CSIC in Madrid, and at the University of Warwick and will be supervised by Dr Therese Martin (CSIC) and Dr Jenny Alexander.

The student will be based in Madrid, have the status of a pre-doctoral fellow at the CSIC and will be expected to participate in CSIC activities. Although English is widely used at the CSIC, working knowledge of Spanish will be needed. Supervisions, by Skype and in person, will be at Warwick.

Applications are welcome from Students from the UK and the EU.

The studentship will cover home/EU fees (full time) and a stipend for UK students or EU students of 22,350 euros, rising to 27,000 euros per annum for three years.

Candidates ideally should have a First Class Honours degree in History of Art or a related discipline and a distinction-level Masters degree in History of Art or a related discipline.

Applications should include a statement of not more than 1,000 words indicating what skills and experience they will bring to the project, a current CV, a transcript of qualifications to date (and anticipated results if you are still studying for your MA), two letters of recommendation plus a writing sample (either a full essay or MA dissertation).

The deadline for applications is March 31st 2018 with interviews to be held in April 2018.

Applications should be made via the University of Warwick online application form.

Please make clear in your online application that you are applying for the Petrifying Wealth studentship.

If you wish to discuss the project in more details please email jennifer.alexander@warwick.ac.uk

Training and Support
Training needs will be assessed immediately after appointment as the level and type of training required will depend on the focus of the research proposal and the skills that the student brings to the discipline.

The student will also be able to participate in workshops offered by Warwick’s Centre for Advanced Doctoral Research Excellence (CADRE) and courses in information technology provided by Warwick’s IT services.

At the beginning of year 2 and 3 a review of training needs will be undertaken by the supervisors, and the regular supervision meetings will monitor this and identify any additional requirements.

Dissemination Plans
The research findings will be disseminated via a 80,000 word doctoral thesis, conference papers, and future publications such as articles, to be submitted beyond the completion date of the project. The results will be incorporated in the Petrifying Wealth database as part of a continuing research resource.

Closing Soon: The Auckland Project at Sotheby’s: Paintings from the Spanish Gallery, Sotheby’s New York

Open until 11 February
1334 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021

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Juan Bautista Maíno, The Penitent Magdalene The Auckland Project/Zurbarán Trust

This exhibition features a selection of outstanding Spanish Old Master paintings by such artists as Juan de Juanes, Juan Bautista Maíno, Juan van der Hamen, Francisco Bayeu and others. Acquired by The Auckland Project through Sotheby’s, these works will feature in the collection of the Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland, North East England, due to open in 2019. The Gallery forms part of an inspiring initiative to create a world-class visitor destination and revitalise this former industrial town through employment, training and educational opportunities.

The exhibition catalogue is available online at this link.

Lecture: Barbaro Martinez-Ruiz, The Impossible Reflection: A New Approach to African Themes in Wifredo Lam’s Art (Cuba, 1902-1982), Oxford, 8 February 2018

Wifredo Lam, The Jungle, 1943, MOMA, New York

Thursday 08 February 2018, 5 pm, University of Oxford, Latin American Centre Seminar Room, 1 Church Walk, Oxford

Bárbaro Martínez-Ruiz (B.A the University of Havana, Ph.D. Yale University, 2004), is an Art Historian with expertise in African and Caribbean artistic, visual and religious practices, whose work challenges traditional disciplinary boundaries and examines the varied understandings of – and engagement with – ‘art’ and ‘visual culture’. Following professorships at Havana’s High Institute of Art from 1993-1997, the Rhode Island School of Design from 2002-2004 and Stanford University from 2004-2013, Martinez-Ruiz joined the University of Cape Town, where he has served as the head of the Art History and Discourse of Art Department since 2013. He is the 2017-2018 recipient of the Leverhulme Visiting Professorship, hosted by Oxford’s School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, and a Senior Fellow at St Antony’s College. His books include Kongo Graphic Writing and Other Narratives of the Sign, Temple University Press, 2013 (English) and El Colegio de México, 2012 (Spanish); Faisal Abdu’Allah: On the Art of Dislocation, Atlantic Center of Modern Art Press, 2012 and Art and Emancipation in Jamaica: Isaac Mendes Belisario and his Worlds, Yale University Press, 2007, for which he received the College Art Association Alfred H. Barr Award. Other recent publications include Ma kisi Nsi: L’art de habitants de region de Mbanza Kongo, in Angola figures de pouvoir. (Paris: Dapper Museum Press, 2010); Writing Bodies in the Bakongo Atlantic Experience, in Performances: Challenges for Art and Anthropology. (Quai Branly Museum Press, 2010); Funerary Pots of the Kongo in Central Africa, in African Terra Cotta: A Millenary Heritage. (Geneva: Musee Barbier Mueller Press, 2008), The Impossible Reflection: A New Approach to African Themes in Wifredo Lam’s Art, in Wifredo Lam. (Miami: Perez Art Museum Press, 2008). In addition to his research and teaching, Martinez-Ruiz is an active curator, whose shows have explored issues of visual communication, dislocation and hybridity in the work of contemporary artists across the African diaspora. He also serves as an editor for the Cuban Studies Magazine and Harvard’s Transition Magazine and was a researcher for Pacific Standard Time AL at the Getty Foundation and the Museum of Latin American Art, Los Angeles California from 2014-16.

Convened by Eduardo Posada-Carbo

Featured Exhibition: Drawings by Rosario Weiss

litoBiblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid, until 22 April 2018

This exhibition features more than a hundred drawings by Rosario Weiss (Madrid, 1814‒1843) as well as a few prints and paintings. It sets out to show the work of an outstanding draughtswoman who is better known for her relationship with Francisco de Goya (1746‒1828) than for her artistic career.

Weiss was one of the few women to join the San Fernando Royal Academy of Fine Arts—as an academician of merit for History Painting—and she achieved her highest distinction in 1842 when she was appointed as drawing instructor to Isabella II and her sister, the Infanta Luisa Fernanda. She held this post for a very short time, as she died of cholera the following year.

Curated by Carlos Sánchez Díez, the display brings together works from the Biblioteca Nacional, the Museo Lázaro Galdiano, the Bibliothèque municipale de Bordeaux, the Museo del Prado, the Museo del Romanticismo and private collections, as well as pieces from other museums and Spanish public institutions.

This exhibition has been organised by the Biblioteca Nacional de España, Museo Lázaro Galdiano and Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica.

Click here for more information.

The exhibition catalogue, About the exhibition catalogue, authored by Carlos Sánchez Díez, can be purchased on the CEEH’s website with 10% discount on online orders until 15 February.