Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship, Society of Architectural Historians, deadline September 30, 2019

The latern tower of Teruel cathedral. By Escarlati – ACDSee for Pentax, CC BY 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1284830

Purpose
This award provides support for travel related to research on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture.  

The Awards
The awards consist of a $2,000 fellowship for an advanced graduate student and a $6,000 fellowship for a senior or emerging scholar. The awardees will be notified in December and will be recognized at the SAH 73rd Annual International Conference in Seattle, Washington (April 29–May 2, 2020). The awards also will be announced in the May 2020 issue of the SAH Newsletter. 

Criteria for Application

These annual fellowships are intended to support the research of graduate students who have completed their coursework and are engaged in doctoral dissertation research, and senior or emerging scholars who have completed their PhD or equivalent terminal degree. The research to be supported must focus on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture, including colonial architecture produced by the Spaniards in the Philippines and what is today the United States. The applicant must be a current member of SAH. 

Reporting Requirements
Following completion of travel and research supported by the fellowship, each de Montêquin Fellowship awardee must submit a written report summarizing their research and explaining what travel was undertaken and how funds were spent. The report will be submitted to the SAH office no later than three months following the completion of work related to the fellowship. Awardees are required to upload images to SAHARA (a minimum of 50 for junior scholars and a minimum of 150 for senior scholars).  

Application Details
You will need two recommendations to apply for this fellowship, a description of the research project on Iberian or Ibero-American architecture to be funded (500 words maximum), a current curriculum vitae (5 pages max), and a statement of purpose.

SAH is accepting applications for the 2020 Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship. The application deadline is September 30, 2019.

Visit sah.org/research-fellowships to apply.

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Featured Exhibition: Thoughts on Portraiture, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, 3 August–18 November 2019

A free one-room show which draws on Birmingham’s collection of modern and contemporary art to explore how artists have used a wide range of styles and imagery to interpret complex human emotion and experiences. The display is centred around the sculpted polychrome group Man and His Sheep (1989) by the Brazilian-born artist Ana Maria Pacheco, which has not been on show for over five years. The striking installation consists of eight lifelike carved wooden figures arranged in a procession. Each imposing figure is carved from a single piece of limewood then painted and waxed to give a startling lifelike appearance, enhanced by their onyx eyes and acrylic teeth, which add a somewhat sinister expression. Pacheco’s oil painting In Illo Tempore I (1994) is also on display. The display also includes two Picasso etchings from the Vollard Suite. Winged Bull Watched by Four Children (1934) shows a monstrous mythological beast, whilst Portrait of Vollard (1937) uses lighter and darker shades to depict different characteristics of Ambroise Vollard, the art dealer who commissioned the Suite of prints. For conservation reasons neither of these works on paper are likely to be on display again soon. Other artists whose portraits are featured in the exhibition include a self-portrait by the Birmingham-born David Bomberg and Frank Auerbach’s etching of his friend the art historian Michael Podro.
Click here for more information.

Pre- and Post-Doctoral Fellowships at the Meadows Museum, Dallas, Texas

Center for Spain in America (CSA) Curatorial Fellowship

Pre-doctoral fellowships are supported by the Center for Spain in America (CSA). The Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica (CEEH) and the Center for Spain in America (CSA) encourage studies on Spanish history, art and literature by establishing doctoral and postdoctoral scholarships at European and American universities, as well as at research centers whose holdings are particularly relevant to the knowledge of Spanish culture. They likewise establish assistantships for curatorial work at museums with significant holdings of Spanish painting.

Requirements:

  • Pre-doctoral students who have completed their course work
  • At least one year of curatorial experience in an art museum; demonstrated knowledge in the field of Spanish art; proficient in Spanish (reading, writing, and speaking).
  • Is appointed by and reports to the director and curatorial staff of the Meadows Museum.
  • Serves a full-time appointment of one year, beginning in September 2020.
  • Performs curatorial research and is responsible for projects as assigned.
  • Travel stipend for research as well as trips to Spain and other destinations as directed by the museum director to perform research and project-based assignments.

Applicants must submit:

  • A full résumé
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • A statement (not to exceed 1500 words) specifying:
    • 1) the applicant’s research goals;
    • 2) how these goals relate to or will benefit the Meadows Museum; and
    • 3) how resources at the Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University and travel related research might be used to accomplish those goals.
  • Applications and letters of recommendation must be received by November 22, 2019. Electronic submissions will not be accepted.

Mail to:

Anne Kindseth
Interim Director of Education
Meadows Museum
P.O. Box 750357
Dallas, Texas 75275-0357

For more information, please contact: akindseth@smu.edu

Mellon Curatorial Fellowship

Post-doctoral fellowships are supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which seeks to strengthen, promote, and defend the centrality of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse, fair, and democratic societies. To this end, its core programs support exemplary and inspiring institutions of higher education and culture.

Requirements:

  • Post-doctoral students who have earned their Ph.D. within the last five years
  • At least one year of curatorial experience in an art museum; demonstrated knowledge in the field of Spanish art; proficient in Spanish (reading, writing, and speaking).
  • Is appointed by and reports to the director and curatorial staff of the Meadows Museum.
  • Serves a full-time appointment of two years, beginning in September 2020.
  • Performs curatorial research and is responsible for projects as assigned.
  • Travel stipend for research as well as trips to Spain and other destinations as directed by the museum director to perform research and project-based assignments.
  • Author a scholarly article for publication and present at least two public lectures, as well as actively participate in the research and organization of special exhibitions or projects.
  • Culminate fellowship by organizing a scholarly, international, two-day colloquium focusing on new research in Spanish art history.

Applicants must submit:

  • A full résumé
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • A statement (not to exceed 1500 words) specifying:
    • 1) the applicant’s research goals;
    • 2) how these goals relate to or will benefit the Meadows Museum; and
    • 3) how resources at the Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University and travel related research might be used to accomplish those goals.
  • Applications and letters of recommendation must be received by November 22, 2019. Electronic submissions will not be accepted.

Click here for more information

Featured Exhibition: ‘Frente a Frente. Dos visiones fotográficas de la Guerra Civil. Constantino Suárez y Florentino López “Floro”‘, Museo Nacional de Antropología, Madrid, until 29 September 2019

At the start of the civil war, Constantino Suárez was a 37-year old professional photographer. 36-year-old Florentino López, known as Floro, owned a shop selling groceries, typewriters, and phtographic material. The two never met, yet between July 1936 and October 1937 both portrayed the conflict from the perspective of their different cities—Gijón y Oviedo—and sides—Suárez was active on the republican front, while López lived in a besieged city always controlled by the Nationalist rebels. Entitled ‘Frente a Frente’, a play of words on the ambiguity between ‘el frente’, the front, and ‘la frente’, the forhead, this exhibition at the Museo Nacional de Antropología presents photographs in the collection of the Museum of the Asturian People (Gijón), focusing on the similarity of subject rather than on differences in politics and outcome.

Eighty years have passed since the end of Spain’s most recent Civil War (1936–1939), but its traumatic legacy continues to cast a long shadow over the lives of generations of Spaniards. The dictatorship of Francisco Franco kept the wounds of the conflict open and raw. In the wars that raged across Europe from the 1930s onwards, the armies on the battlefield fought alongside the civilian population, which unfortunately took centre stage as the greatest victim of the violent conflicts. This exhibition shows different aspects of life during wartime in Asturias, among both civilians and combatants, between July 1936 and October 1937, when the fall of Gijón marked the definitive defeat of the Republican Northern Front. The images captured by these two photographers are similar in ways that transcend their attachment to the two opposing sides in the war. Both depicted the same society caught up in conflict. What they found was something in common: the same destruction, the same pain, the same suffering, but also the same wish to have life go on despite it all.

Click here for an article on the exhibition, published on 23 July in El País.

Click here for the exhibition website and here for a booklet.

Featured Exhibition: ‘Art and Empire: The Golden Age of Spain’, The San Diego Museum of Art, CA, until 2 September 2019

The neo-plateresque façade of the museum, begun in 1924 and designed by William Templeton Johnson and Robert W. Snyder, with sculptures by Chris Muelle

This new exhibition features a diverse selection of more than 100 outstanding works produced by leading artists from Spain and its global territories.

Spain’s Golden Age may be defined as the extraordinary moment when the visual arts, architecture, literature, and music all reached unprecedented heights.

Art & Empire: The Golden Age of Spain is the first exhibition in the United States to expand the notion of “Golden Age” to include the Hispanic world beyond the shores of the Iberian Peninsula. Such far-flung Spanish-controlled centers as Antwerp, Naples, Mexico, Lima, and the Philippines are represented by paintings, sculpture and decorative arts of astounding quality and variety from the pivotal years of about 1660 to 1750.

Artists featured in the exhibition include Diego Velázquez, Peter Paul Rubens, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Francisco de Zurbarán, Jusepe de Ribera, El Greco, Juan de Valdés Leal, Juan Sánchez Cotán, and many more. This exhibition also marks the first time in the Museum’s history that all five of the Spanish masters represented on the Museum’s building façade —Velázquez, Murillo, Zurbarán, Ribera and El Greco— will be shown together at the Museum.

Also on display is a contemporary response to Art and Empire: The Golden Age of Spain, featuring a group of 12 encaustic-on-canvas “portraits” of Christ’s disciples by contemporary Spanish artist José-María Cano.

Click here for more information

Featured Ehixibition: ‘Urban Impulses. Latin American Photography from 1959 to 2017’, The Photographer’s Gallery, London, until 6 October 2019

Fernando Bedoya, Pinochet, 1987

Exhibition of more than 200 photographs by twentieth-century Latin American artists, selected from the extensive holdings of the London and Morocco-based collectors Leticia and Stanislas Poniatowski. The exhibition was first shown at the Rencontres d’Arles festival 2017. Among the photographs are monochrome works by the contemporary Mexican photographer Carlos Somonte, who is a lifelong friend and colleague of the film director Alfonso Cuarón, and covered the shoot of Cuarón’s black and white Oscar-winning film Roma.

Please click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: ‘Weavers of the Clouds. Textiles from Peru’, The Fashion and Textile Museum, London, until 8 Sep 2019

Weavers of the Clouds. Textiles from Peru, The Fashion and Textile Museum, 21 June – 8 Sep 2019, brings the captivating art and textiles of Peru to the UK, showcasing some of the world’s oldest and most colourful designs. The exhibition features rarely seen objects from private collections and national museums, including full costumes, tapestries, paintings, photographs, illustrations and accessories. It examines the vibrant applied crafts, heritage and traditions of Peru, celebrating the culture and customs of the artisan and their influence on design, fashion and beyond. Each geographical region is associated with a different technique or application; the exhibition will feature weaving from the Central Highlands, felting created in the North, floral embroidery produced in Ayacucho in the South West, knitwear originating in the Highlands and machine embroidery from the Colca Valley. Exhibition highlights include a 16th-century Quipu – knotted fibres used by the Incas as a form of communication – and a four cornered hat, dating from 600 AD. A rare pre-Hispanic tunic created in orange, yellow and blue macaw feathers is displayed alongside a sequined waistcoat emblazoned with birds and flowers and a Shipibo costume from the Amazon Rainforest, embroidered to reflect the astrological map. Tapestries and weaving from a private collection include a ceremonial tunic created using a Scaffold weave; one of the most unusual weaving techniques in the world, previously existing only in the Andean region of South America. Despite dating back to 800 AD, the influence of these techniques can be seen across hundreds of years; in particular in the works of Bauhaus designers Gunta Stölzl and Anni Albers. 

The costumes and textiles on display are complemented by a selection of varied and engaging photographs by Marta Tucci, Max Milligan and Sebastian Castaneda Vita. Also on display are postcards by influential photographer Martin Chambi. Chambi was one of the earliest known indigenous Latin American photographers, whose black and white postcards, featuring images of the indigenous people of Cuzco and their costumes, helped to disseminate knowledge of Peru in the 20th Century. Postcards were an important part of Chambi’s practice; a selection of examples, dating from the 1930s, are being presented in re-creation of his iconic studio.

The Fashion and Textile Museum is a contemporary fashion museum in Bermondsey, London. Founded by British designer Zandra Rhodes in 2003, the museum is part of the Newham College of Further Education, and is open Tuesday-Sunday.