Tomorrow: Artistic Trade between Spain and its Viceroyalties from 1500 to 1800, King’s College, Cambridge, 22 June 2018

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This is the first conference in the United Kingdom devoted to artistic trade between Spain and its viceroyalties. Referring to Cambridge’s Spanish and colonial art collections and with the indispensable support of the Nigel Glendinning studentship for Spanish studies, this conference brings together scholars specialized in the art from the Spanish Viceroyalties. The speakers will trace the artworks from their production, their movement with the help of agents and their collection and display at their destination. Such approach avoids setting an epicentre and periphery but establishes an equalitarian platform on the movement of art within the Spanish Empire.

8:30- 9:15 – Registration.

Introductory remarks:

9:15- 9:30 – Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

Keynote speaker:

9:30- 10:00 – Luisa Elena Alcalá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Passageways of Art in the Atlantic world: Artists, Patrons and Agents.

  1. Workshops and Artists Producing Art for the Spanish Viceroyalties and Transitory Spaces.

Chaired by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

10:00- 10:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum), Shipwrecked Ivories: The Confluence of East and West.

10:30- 11:00 – Piers Baker Bates (The Open University), Traveling between the Viceroyalties: Artistic Translation in the Sixteenth-century Hispanic World.

11:00- 11:30 – Escardiel González Estevez (Universidad de Sevilla), Alonso Vázquez between Seville, Mexico and Manila (1603-1608): The Paradigm of a “Global Artist”.

11:30- 12:00- Questions.

12:00-13:30- Lunch break.

  1. The Role of Agents Commercializing Artworks between Spain and its Viceroyalties

Chaired by José Ramón Marcaida López (University of Saint Andrews)

13:30-14:00 – Sandra Van Ginhoven (Getty Research Institute, Research Associate), Spanish Transatlantic Agents and the Flemish Guilliam Forchondt in the Overseas Paintings Trade.

14:00- 14:30 – Corinna Gramatke (Technical University of Munich Chair of Conservation-Restoration), “The Portable Europe”: European Artworks for the Jesuit Province of Paraguay (1608-1767).

14:30-15:00 – Eduardo Lamas Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Madrilenian Painters and America: Artistic Production for Overseas Trade Networks and their possible Agents.

15:00- 16:00- Questions followed by a coffee break.

  1. Collecting and Display in Private, Civil and Religious Spaces in the Spanish Viceroyalties.

Chaired by Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)

16:00-16:30 – Kathryn Santner (Leverhulme Trust Fellow, ILAS, London), Conventual Art Collections and Artistic Exchange in the Colonial Viceroyalties.

16:30-17:00 – Isabel Oleas Mogollón (University of Delaware), The Divine and the Self: Uses and Meanings of Mirrors in Quito’s Jesuit Church.

17:00-17:30 – Veronika Winkler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München), Witnessing the Saint’s Life: Patrons and Hagiographical Painting Cycles of Viceregal Peru.

17:30- 18:00- Final questions and closing remarks.

For further information please contact Akemi Herráez Vossbrink at alh64@cam.ac.uk.

To book your place, please click here

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ARTES AGM and Prize-Giving Ceremony Report, Oxford, 14 June 2018

home2On 14 June 2018 ARTES held its AGM and prize-giving ceremony in Oxford. It was a day packed with special visits to rarely-seen collections of Spanish art in the city. The day started at Campion Hall, a Jesuit private hall which hosts a fascinating private collection of religious art from Europe, Latin America, and from Christian missions elsewhere in the world.

The visit was followed by the group’s annual general meeting and prize-giving ceremony, held at the Taylorian, Oxford University’s centre for the study of Modern European languages and literatures. Artes presented the following prizes:

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Artes’ honorary president, Sir John Elliott (Regius Professor Emeritus, University of Oxford) with some of the prize winners

The Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal
Awarded to Javier Vicente Arenas (MA Student, Warburg Institute, London), for his essay titled Constructing a ‘Transmediterranean’ Identity: Rodrigo de Borgia’s Italian Angels in Valencia Cathedral (1472-81)

Prizes were also presented to two runners-up: Jamie Haskell (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay titled The Hispano-Moresque Haggadah and Helena Haughli (MA Student, Courtauld Institute of Art, London), for her essay The Botella de Astorga Reliquary and the Transfer, Functions, and Meanings of a Fatimid Rock Crystal in Remote Christian Spain. 

ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholarships

Travel scholarships were awarded to:

Susy Oram, who will travel to Mexico to study Mudéjar art and architecture in the region during the viceregal period.

Danielle Smith, CEEH/David Wilkie Scholar for the Study of Spanish Art at the University of Edinburgh, who will travel to Madrid to carry out research for her PhD dissertation, titled ‘Colecciones de Trajes de España: exploring sartorial representation in Spanish printed books, 1777-1825′

 

Elizabeth Chant, a PhD candidate at the School of European Languages, Cultures, and Society, UCL, who will travel to Seville and Madrid to research ‘Illuminating the Map: Spanish Enlightenment Cartography of the Costa Patagónica

 

Stefanie Lenk, a curator and PhD candidate at the University of Oxford, who is studying the re-use of Roman altars in paleochristian and Visigothic churches in Spain.
 
This scholarship was awarded to Sylvia Alvares-Correa, who is working on a PhD titled ‘From Flanders to Portugal: the transmission of northern art, artists, and techniques to Portugal through the collection of Rainha Dona Leonor’s (1458-1525)’ at the university of Oxford.

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The day continued with a visit to Magdalen College, founded by William Waynflete in 1458. The College holds wide-ranging art collections, including a Spanish altarpiece representing  Christ Carrying the Cross in the College Chapel. Previously attributed to Valdés Leal, the work, which remains unstudied, was more likely produced by another Sevillian painter in seventeenth century.

 

Featured Exhibitions: ‘Zuloaga. Character and Emotion’, Centro Cultural Bancaja, Valencia (until 26 August 2018) and ‘Sorolla and Spirituality’ (until 2 September 2018)

ZuloagaZuloaga. Character and Emotion (until 26 August 2018)

This exhibition features some 66 paintings by the Basque artist, several of which are displayed in public for the first time. Ranging in date from 1888, when Zuloaga was 18, to 1945, the works trace the artist’s development from his training in Paris to the mature work inspired by Spanish artists such as Velázquez, Ribera, Zurbarán, Goya and El Greco. The curators, Sofía Barrón y Carlos Alonso, focus on Zuloaga as both a landscapist and a portraitist. They showcase his representations of turn-of-the-century aristocracy, bourgeoisie and intellectuals, as well as his intimate portraits of family members. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue and is organised in collaboration with the Museo Zuloaga in Pedraza (Segovia) and its president, the artist’s granddaughter, María Rosa Suárez Zuloaga.

SorollaSorolla and Spirituality (until 2 September 2018)

This exhibition features the work Yo soy el pan de la vida, exhibited to the public for the first time since its recent restoration, the result of a collaboration with the owners of the work, the Lladró family. Curated by Felipe Garín, the exhibition explores the religious themes which the Valencian artist explored briefly in the earlier part of his career. It comprises six works produced between 1883 y 1899, including ¡Triste herencia!, Monja en oración, Santa ClotildeMesa petitoria, and La Virgen María, all on loan from major public collections.

Opens today: Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up, V&A Museum, London

640Open until 4 November 2018, this exhibition presents an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico. Click here to book tickets and see related events.

 

Opens today: ‘Woman. Art & Power. Three Habsburg Women’, Schloss Ambras, Innsbruck

fc3a4cher-kk-4751-1-248x4002xRunning until 7th October 2018, this large-scale special exhibition at Ambras Castle, Innsbruck focuses on three remarkable Renaissance women, rulers and collectors of the House of Habsburg engaged in the arts: Margaret of Austria (1480-1530), Mary of Hungary (1505-1558), and Catherine of Austria (1507-1578). This will be the first comparative analysis of courtly female patronage will be undertaken.

This high-calibre exhibition presents some one hundred works from important European collections, including objects from Ambras Castle, Innsbruck and outstanding pieces from the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna.

The major special exhibition is curated by Dagmar Eichberger and Annemarie Jordan Gschwend and will be accompanied by a catalogue in German/English.

Featured Exhibition: Descubriendo a Luis Masson, Museo Lázaro Galdiano, Madrid, until 26 August

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As part of the 20thanniversary edition of the mass photography display of contemporary and historic works, PHotoESPAÑA (6 June-26 August 2018, venues across Madrid, Barcelona and in Valencia), the Museo Lázaro Galdiano in Madrid will open an exhibition Descubriendo a Luis Masson commemorating the work of the French 19th-century photographer Luis Masson (born 1825), who produced a complete topographical photographic study of Spain and was also noted for his photographic reproductions of the works of Murillo. Masson established himself in Seville in 1858 with his wife, Lorenza Simonin, with whom he worked over the next eight years producing a wide range of architectural photographs, some stereoscopic, of Seville and other Andalucian cities and monuments, working in particular for the Duque de Montpensier. In 1866 he moved to Madrid, recording from there the cities of Toledo, Ávila, Valladolid, Salamanca and Burgos, before returning to Seville at the end of the 1870s, where he was last recorded in 1881.The photographs are selected from the private Colección Fernández Rivero de Fotografía Antigua, which owns about 35,000 original photographs ranging from the 1840s through to the early decades of the 20thcentury. It focuses its collections on Spanish images and in particular photographs created in Andalucia, with a special section on Málaga and its province.  The exhibition was previously shown (January-March 2018) at the Centro Andaluz de la Fotografía, Almería. An accompanying monograph by Juan Antonio Fernández Rivero and María Teresa García Ballesteros, Descubriendo a Luis Masson, fotógrafo en la España del XIX which inventories 511 of Masson’s photographs was published by  Ediciones del Genal, Málaga in 2017.

A New Acquisition on Display at the Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

dsc_0008Now on display at the Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid the museum’s newly acquired group of 19 individual polychrome sculptures by the Seville-born Luisa Roldán (1652-1706), forming the unusual subject of the Cavalcade of the Kings. These small-scale cedar-wood painted and gilded figures were acquired in December 2017 after being export-stopped and are the first examples of La Roldana’s work to enter the Valladolid museum. Amongst the mixed-race cavalcade, which is presumed to have formed the cortege for a much larger, but now dismantled, group, there is a fourth king, the King of Tharsis, the mythical Hispanic region cited in the Bible. The group is believed to have been carved before the sculptress moved to the Madrid court in 1689. A video clip showing some of the figures can be viewed here.